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Indian Olympics Association does not want to boycott Dow Chemical sponsored London Olympics 2012. Union Carbide (Dow Chemical subsidary) was declared a fugitive from justice by Indian courts in 1992, since they were responsible for killing 15000 plus people Bhopal Gas Tragedy (December 2–3, 1984).

Dow Chemical acquired Union Carbide as a wholly owned subsidiary in 2001.The area around the factory is densely populated and continues to be heavily contaminated by chemicals and toxins produced by the factory which Dow, despite their evident responsibility, have thus far refused to clean up.

The situation in Bhopal is a humanitarian and environmental catastrophe that continues to affect tens of thousands of people today. For further information see www.bhopal.org

By refusing to produce its fugitive subsidiary to face trial, Dow Chemical too has committed the crime of sheltering a fugitive. Both Dow and Union Carbide have failed to come forward to clean up their toxic mess in Bhopal. These wastes have poisoned the drinking water of more than 25,000 people. Children born in these communities are so deformed that they will never enjoy sports or know the joys of childhood.In another case - Vietnam, the dioxin-tainted Agent Orange supplied by Dow and other US companies has crippled more than 500,000 people. Like in the case of its victims in Bhopal, Dow has failed to do anything to compensate or rehabilitate its Vietnamese victims, or clean up their environment.

IOA is going is going to put ‘the boycott’ to debate (15th December’11).

We need to convince them that India should not participate in London Olympics 2012 unless Dow Chemical is removed as a sponsor.

 

 

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Letter to
Indian Government
Sir,

We, the undersigned, are alarmed at the casual manner in which an IOA spokesperson ruled out the possibility of any boycott of the London Olympics 2012, which is fast gaining the unfortunate nickname of Dowlympics.

Whether India should or should not boycott the Olympics is a decision that the Association must make after taking into consideration public sentiments on this sensitive matter, and after considering whether or not LOCOG will dissociate itself with the disreputable sponsor.

It is unfortunate that the Indian Olympic Association failed to raise the matter of Dow Chemical's sponsorship in repeated meetings of the International Olympics Committee. But it is never too late to do the right thing. Numerous people, including Indian and international Olympians, parliamentarians from India, the UK and other places, and eminent people and organisations from around the world have expressed their outrage at the inappropriate partnership between Dow and Olympics. They have called upon the organisers to dissociate themselves from the tainted corporation.

Dow Chemical and its subsidiary's crimes of commission and omission are not minor. Union Carbide was declared a fugitive from justice by Indian courts in 1992. By refusing to produce its fugitive subsidiary to face trial, Dow Chemical too has committed the crime of sheltering a fugitive. Both Dow and Union Carbide have failed to come forward to clean up their toxic mess in Bhopal. These wastes have poisoned the drinking water of more than 25,000 people. Children born in these communities are so deformed that they will never enjoy sports or know the joys of childhood.

In Vietnam, the dioxin-tainted Agent Orange supplied by Dow and other US companies has crippled more than 500,000 people. Like in the case of its victims in Bhopal, Dow has failed to do anything to compensate or rehabilitate its Vietnamese victims, or clean up their environment.

It ll be a shame, if Indian athletes were to march and compete under Dow Chemical's logo, even as the company thumbs its nose at Indian courts.

Rather than rule out India's options, the Indian Olympic Association must make it clear to the London Organising Committee that India will boycott the 2012 Olympics unless Dow is removed from the list of sponsors for this and future Olympic games.

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Sincerely,