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Petitioning the humane society of the US The United States of America

Help save the animals

there are 200 cases in the state of washington every month.

Facts About Animal Abuse & Domestic Violence

In association with the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Why it Matters
•71% of pet-owning women entering women’s shelters reported that their batterer had injured, maimed, killed or threatened family pets for revenge or to psychologically control victims; 32% reported their children had hurt or killed animals.
•68% of battered women reported violence towards their animals. 87% of these incidents occurred in the presence of the women, and 75% in the presence of the children, to psychologically control and coerce them.
•13% of intentional animal abuse cases involve domestic violence.
•Between 25% and 40% of battered women are unable to escape abusive situations because they worry about what will happen to their pets or livestock should they leave.
•Pets may suffer unexplained injuries, health problems, permanent disabilities at the hands of abusers, or disappear from home.
•Abusers kill, harm, or threaten children’s pets to coerce them into sexual abuse or to force them to remain silent about abuse. Disturbed children kill or harm animals to emulate their parents’ conduct, to prevent the abuser from killing the pet, or to take out their aggressions on another victim.
•In one study, 70% of animal abusers also had records for other crimes. Domestic violence victims whose animals were abused saw the animal cruelty as one more violent episode in a long history of indiscriminate violence aimed at them and their vulnerability.
•Investigation of animal abuse is often the first point of social services intervention for a family in trouble.
•For many battered women, pets are sources of comfort providing strong emotional support: 98% of Americans consider pets to be companions or members of the family.
•Animal cruelty problems are people problems. When animals are abused, people are at risk.
Did You Know?
•More American households have pets than have children. We spend more money on pet food than on baby food. There are more dogs in the U.S. than people in most countries in Europe - and more cats than dogs.
•A child growing up in the U.S. is more likely to have a pet than a live-at-home father.
•Pets live most frequently in homes with children: 64.1% of homes with children under age 6, and 74.8% of homes with children over age 6, have pets. The woman is the primary caregiver in 72.8% of pet-owning households.
•Battered women have been known to live in their cars with their pets for as long as four months until an opening was available at a pet-friendly safe house.
State Animal Cruelty Laws
Anti-cruelty laws exist in all U.S. states and territories to prohibit unnecessary killing, mutilating, torturing, beating, neglecting and abandoning animals, or depriving them of proper food, water or shelter. Animal cruelty cases may be investigated by a local humane society, SPCA or animal control agency or, in areas where these organizations are not present, by police or sheriff’s departments. When an investigation uncovers enough evidence to warrant prosecution, charges may be filed by the local district or state’s attorney. Often, only the most serious cases generate sufficient sympathy and evidence to warrant prosecution, and gaining convictions may be very difficult.

If You Need Help
Contact your local humane society, SPCA, animal control agency, or veterinarian to see if they have temporary foster care facilities for pets belonging to battered women.

What You Can Do
•Have your pets vaccinated against rabies, and license your pets with your town or county: make sure these registrations are in your name to help prove your ownership.
•Consider and plan for the safety and welfare of your animals. Do not leave pets with your abuser. Be prepared to take your pets with you: many women’s shelters have established “safe haven” foster care programs for the animal victims of domestic violence.
•Alternatively, arrange temporary shelter for your pets with a veterinarian, family member, trusted friend, or local animal shelter.
What Advocates Can Do For Battered Women With Pets
•Add questions about the presence of pets and their welfare to shelter intake questionnaires and risk assessments.
•Work with animal shelters, veterinarians, and rescue groups to establish “safe haven” foster care programs for the animal victims of domestic violence; some women’s shelters are building kennels at their facilities.
•Include provisions for pets in safety planning strategies.
•Help your clients to prove ownership of their animals.
•Help victims to retrieve animals left behind.
•Include animals in abuse prevention orders.
•Help victims find pet-friendly transitional and permanent housing.
•When victims can no longer care for their pets, make referrals to animal adoption agencies.
•Establish community coalitions against family violence that include humane societies, SPCAs, animal control agencies, and veterinarians. Invite representatives from these agencies to train your staff on how animal abuse cases are investigated and prosecuted: offer to train their staffs and volunteers about domestic violence issues.

There are 200 cases in the state of washington every month.

Facts About Animal Abuse & Domestic Violence

In association with the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Why it Matters
•71% of pet-owning women entering women’s shelters reported that their batterer had injured, maimed, killed or threatened family pets for revenge or to psychologically control victims; 32% reported their children had hurt or killed animals.
•68% of battered women reported violence towards their animals. 87% of these incidents occurred in the presence of the women, and 75% in the presence of the children, to psychologically control and coerce them.
•13% of intentional animal abuse cases involve domestic violence.
•Between 25% and 40% of battered women are unable to escape abusive situations because they worry about what will happen to their pets or livestock should they leave.
•Pets may suffer unexplained injuries, health problems, permanent disabilities at the hands of abusers, or disappear from home.
•Abusers kill, harm, or threaten children’s pets to coerce them into sexual abuse or to force them to remain silent about abuse. Disturbed children kill or harm animals to emulate their parents’ conduct, to prevent the abuser from killing the pet, or to take out their aggressions on another victim.
•In one study, 70% of animal abusers also had records for other crimes. Domestic violence victims whose animals were abused saw the animal cruelty as one more violent episode in a long history of indiscriminate violence aimed at them and their vulnerability.
•Investigation of animal abuse is often the first point of social services intervention for a family in trouble.
•For many battered women, pets are sources of comfort providing strong emotional support: 98% of Americans consider pets to be companions or members of the family.
•Animal cruelty problems are people problems. When animals are abused, people are at risk.
Did You Know?
•More American households have pets than have children. We spend more money on pet food than on baby food. There are more dogs in the U.S. than people in most countries in Europe - and more cats than dogs.
•A child growing up in the U.S. is more likely to have a pet than a live-at-home father.
•Pets live most frequently in homes with children: 64.1% of homes with children under age 6, and 74.8% of homes with children over age 6, have pets. The woman is the primary caregiver in 72.8% of pet-owning households.
•Battered women have been known to live in their cars with their pets for as long as four months until an opening was available at a pet-friendly safe house.
State Animal Cruelty Laws
Anti-cruelty laws exist in all U.S. states and territories to prohibit unnecessary killing, mutilating, torturing, beating, neglecting and abandoning animals, or depriving them of proper food, water or shelter. Animal cruelty cases may be investigated by a local humane society, SPCA or animal control agency or, in areas where these organizations are not present, by police or sheriff’s departments. When an investigation uncovers enough evidence to warrant prosecution, charges may be filed by the local district or state’s attorney. Often, only the most serious cases generate sufficient sympathy and evidence to warrant prosecution, and gaining convictions may be very difficult.

If You Need Help
Contact your local humane society, SPCA, animal control agency, or veterinarian to see if they have temporary foster care facilities for pets belonging to battered women.

What You Can Do
•Have your pets vaccinated against rabies, and license your pets with your town or county: make sure these registrations are in your name to help prove your ownership.
•Consider and plan for the safety and welfare of your animals. Do not leave pets with your abuser. Be prepared to take your pets with you: many women’s shelters have established “safe haven” foster care programs for the animal victims of domestic violence.
•Alternatively, arrange temporary shelter for your pets with a veterinarian, family member, trusted friend, or local animal shelter.
What Advocates Can Do For Battered Women With Pets
•Add questions about the presence of pets and their welfare to shelter intake questionnaires and risk assessments.
•Work with animal shelters, veterinarians, and rescue groups to establish “safe haven” foster care programs for the animal victims of domestic violence; some women’s shelters are building kennels at their facilities.
•Include provisions for pets in safety planning strategies.
•Help your clients to prove ownership of their animals.
•Help victims to retrieve animals left behind.
•Include animals in abuse prevention orders.
•Help victims find pet-friendly transitional and permanent housing.
•When victims can no longer care for their pets, make referrals to animal adoption agencies.
•Establish community coalitions against family violence that include humane societies, SPCAs, animal control agencies, and veterinarians. Invite representatives from these agencies to train your staff on how animal abuse cases are investigated and prosecuted: offer to train their staffs and volunteers about domestic violence issues.

 

 

Here is 2 cases:

 

 

18 cats abandoned in apartment
Poughkeepsie, NY (US)

Incident Date: Tuesday, Jan 31, 2012
County: Dutchess

Disposition: Alleged
Case Images: 1 files available

Alleged:
» Heidi Gover
» Wayne Oles

On Tuesday, February 7 Heidi Gover and Wayne Oles of Poughkeepsie were charged with 18 counts each of Section 355 (Abandonment of Animals, Class A Misdemeanor) and 3 counts each of Section 353 (Animal Cruelty, Class A
Misdemeanor).

On January 31, 2012 Dutchess County SPCA Humane Law Enforcement Officers received a call regarding 18 cats left in a City of Poughkeepsie apartment. Deputy Gregory Winters from the Dutchess County Sheriff's Office and DCSPCA Humane Law Enforcement Officers entered the apartment and found the abandoned cats.

Two cats needed to have surgery to remove eyes damaged because of eye infections. Veterinarians at the Dutchess County SPCA medical clinic performed the operations. Both animals are recovering at the shelter. All of the cats were infested with fleas.

The Dutchess County SPCA is asking the public for donations to support the two eye surgeries, 18 sets of vaccinations, 18 spay/neuter operations as well as the care and feeding of the 18 abandoned cats.

"This is a tragedy that did not need to happen. Our low-cost medical clinic is there for people who can't afford vaccinations, spay/neuter and care for sick pets. There is a lot we can do to help owners struggling to keep their pets. Hoarders wait until the situation has spiraled out of control. Then it falls to us to rescue the animals and enforce laws against cruelty," stated Joyce
Garrity, Executive Director.

The Dutchess County SPCA, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, is the lead agency for animal rescue and adoption in Dutchess County. The DCSPCA is a no-kill shelter with a 141-year history of concern, caring and providing shelter for unwanted, abused, abandoned and neglected animals. The Dutchess County SPCA rescues, shelters, and secures permanent homes for adoptable companion animals; advocates for the highest standards



Read more: 18 cats abandoned in apartment - Poughkeepsie, NY | Pet-Abuse.Com Animal Cruelty Database http://www.pet-abuse.com/cases/19394/NY/US/#ixzz272JnYDBv

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 sea lions found shot to death
Puget Sound, WA (US)

Incident Date: Sunday, Jan 1, 2012
County: Pierce

Disposition: Open

Suspect(s) Unknown - We need your help!

Wildlife officials report at least 8 sea lions have been found shot to death in the Puget Sound region in recent weeks.

Both the Washington's Department of Fish and Wildlife and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are investigating the deaths. The bodies of seven sea lions were recently found on the Nisqually River, all apparently shot. On Monday, a sea lion was found dead on West Seattle's Lincoln Park beach.

Bullets were found in each of the bodies of the sea lions. A necropsy performed on the sea lion found in West Seattle also revealed the animal endured a shark bite, and had twisted intestines, according to the animal protection group Seal Sitters.

Investigators said they do not know who killed the sea lions. The penalty for poaching a sea lion could range from fees to possible jail time.

One of the sea lions found on the Nisqually River was a Stellar sea lion, federally protected under the Endangered Species Act. The one found in West Seattle was a California sea lion, which are a protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act.

Almost two years ago, five sea lions were found shot to death on West Seattle beaches. In that instance, the Humane Society offerred a $2,500 reward for information leading to an arrest.



Read more: 8 sea lions found shot to death - Puget Sound, WA | Pet-Abuse.Com Animal Cruelty Database http://www.pet-abuse.com/cases/19217/WA/US/#ixzz272KgHtRt

 

 

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    The United States of America


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