Petition Closed

Can you help us end a deadly veterinary dog lab in Oklahoma? Veterinary schools should teach compassion and respect for the animals their students are learning to treat. Although a growing majority of veterinary schools have adopted humane teaching methods, some schools, including Oklahoma State University at Stillwater, still buy dogs who originated in shelters and subject them to repeated surgical procedures and death.

Oklahoma State University at Stillwater (OSU) currently purchases dogs from class B random source animal dealers, who obtain those dogs from shelters and other sources and then sell them to laboratories and schools to be used in deadly testing and training procedures. Once the dogs arrive at OSU, veterinary students practice on them in numerous ways, including by cutting into their skin to study wounds and wound repair, and by cutting into their bodies to practice surgeries. After the students finish, the dogs are killed and disposed of.

Better, more humane teaching methods are the new standard in veterinary education. Instead of subjecting dogs from shelters to cruel, unnecessary and  lethal veterinary student procedures, progressive vet schools now have humane donor programs and send students to work in animal shelters and veterinary practices, providing medical care and surgeries that these animals need. Among the three veterinary schools in Oklahoma, only OSU still conducts terminal dog labs to train students. Murray State College, for example, sends students to the Ardmore Animal Shelter, where they assist the staff with much-needed tasks such as spaying and neutering animals.

What You Can Do:

Send an e-mail or call OSU’s veterinary school dean and politely ask him to replace terminal dog labs with more humane training methods. Being polite is the most effective way to help these animals.

Michael D. Lorenz, D.V.M.
Dean, OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences
205 McElroy Hall
Stillwater, OK 74078-2005
Phone: 405-744-6651
Fax: 405-744-6633
E-mail: michael.lorenz@okstate.edu

Thank you so much for taking action!

Letter to
Dean, OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences  Michael D. Lorenz, D.V.M.
Please consider more humane teaching methods in your vet school.
Veterinary schools should teach compassion and respect for the animals their students are learning to treat. A growing majority of veterinary schools have adopted humane teaching methods. Oklahoma State University at Stillwater, still buy dogs who originated in shelters and subject them to repeated surgical procedures and death.
Purchasing dogs from "Class B" random source animal dealers, who obtain those dogs from shelters and other sources and then sell them to laboratories and schools to be used in deadly testing and training procedures is not the best way to achieve your goal and does not teach the compassion and respect the students will need.
Once the dogs arrive at OSU, veterinary students practice on them in numerous ways, including by cutting into their skin to study wounds and wound repair, and by cutting into their bodies to practice surgeries. After the students finish, the dogs are killed and disposed of. Is this the humane way to teach?

Better, more humane teaching methods are the new standard in veterinary education. Instead of subjecting dogs from shelters to cruel, unnecessary and lethal veterinary student procedures, progressive vet schools now have humane donor programs and send students to work in animal shelters and veterinary practices, providing medical care and surgeries that these animals need. Among the three veterinary schools in Oklahoma, only OSU still conducts terminal dog labs to train students. Murray State College, for example, sends students to the Ardmore Animal Shelter, where they assist the staff with much-needed tasks such as spaying and neutering animals.
There are many shelters that need veterinarians where your students could go to learn and practice on live animals.
Please consider changing your teaching methods to a more humane, progressive procedure.
Thank you,