Confirmed victory
Petitioning Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, MP - Nunavut Health Canada
This petition was delivered to:
Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, MP - Nunavut
Health Canada

Do not open paid blood donor clinic

Allowing paid blood donor clinics in Toronto and elsewhere will increase the risk of another, tragic and unnecessary, tainted blood crisis when tens of thousands of Canadians got infected with AIDS and Hepatitis C through blood. One of those people was my late husband James Kreppner. Another was my buddy, the late John Plater. I'm tired of burying my loved ones.

Signing this petition will help send a message to our federal Health Minister that Canadians do not want another tainted blood crisis. The louder the message, the better. Please ask your family and friends to sign this as well. Please ask Facebook friends to repost it. 

There are many other ways to help. Please feel free to contact the following and just say you are against paid blood donations in Canada.

1) your Member of Parliament

http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parlinfo/Compilations/HouseOfCommons/MemberByPostalCode.aspx?Menu=HOC

2) your Member of Provincial Parliament. For Ontarians, it is:

http://fyed.elections.on.ca/fyed/en/form_page_en.jsp

3) the press (Globe, Toronto Star, etc.)

4) TV (CBC, etc.)

5) social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.).

We surpassed 300 signatures everyone! We going strong and collecting as many signatures as possible until June 9, 2013. Please keep telling everyone to sign thank you! 

Thank you very much for your help in ensuring the safest blood system for all of us. 

 


Letter to
Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, MP - Nunavut Health Canada
Do not open the paid blood donor clinics in Toronto or Hamilton. Please remember the lessons from the $17 million, 4-year public inquiry into tainted blood, namely, the Krever Inquiry.

Krever reviewed the largest single public health disaster in Canadian history, which infected thousands of Canadians from coast to coast, with AIDS and Hepatitis C, many of whom are now dead.

He concluded that the blood system should be governed by key principles including: "treating blood as a public resource; declining to pay donors who give blood; ...(and), making safety paramount."

There are reasons for his recommendation to rely, as much as possible, on unpaid blood donations. The most important being that thousands of Canadians died unnecessarily because, in the past, our public health sentinels, such as Health Canada, relied too heavily on paid blood donations.

This time, the concern is not about AIDS or Hepatitis. It's about the next blood-borne pathogen coming down the pipeline. By definition, we can't test for that unknown threat yet. It’s important to remember that AIDS and Hep C were hypothetical threats too, in the early days before we even had names for them. But we now know that they became very real in a bad way for the thousands of Canadians who were infected. Our current system of testing, though up there with the safest in the world, is not going to catch the next unknown blood-borne disease. And it’s just a matter of time before that new disease enters the blood system; the latency period (time before the disease manifests), for some diseases, can be decades long.

What we can do now is ensure the blood we collect, from its source, is as safe as possible. We have the option of increasing unpaid/altruistic donations which the World Health Organization, (WHO), recognizes as safer than paid donations. This is not about blaming anyone for lifestyle choices. It's about the science of safety.

We must continue to make the safety of our Canadian blood system our priority. Paid donor clinics are the wrong way to go; increasing the supply of less than the safest possible blood product is not optimal.

Let's not allow our Canadian blood system to move further away from altruism and toward increased privatization. Doing so would allow health care to deteriorate into “profit care” which goes against the very grain of what it means to be a Canadian.