Petition Closed
1,023
Supporters

These reports, which rated 12,700 NYC teachers based solely on the 2010 test scores of their students, filtered through a complicated value-added formula, are seen by most experts as highly unreliable, based on false or incomplete data and include huge margins of error.
Even the panel of "technical experts" handpicked by DOE said they could not endorse the use of these for accountability, promotion or tenure" purposes, pointing out that "test scores capture only one dimension of teacher effectiveness,  they are not intended to serve as a summary measure of teacher performance" and that "there are likely to be additional factors not yet considered that influence student achievement."
There is no other profession in the public or private sector in which this kind of unreliable and potentially damaging information is made public, and the main effect would be to further undermine teacher morale -- already at an all-time low in this city.

Letter to
Education editor of the NY Times Jodi Rudoren
Managing editor of the Wall St. Journal Almar Latour
Editor in chief, NY Post Col Allen
and 4 others
Asst. News Editor of the Daily News Carrie Melago
Editor in chief, Daily News Colin Myler
Public editor of NY Times Arthur S. Brisbane
Executive editor of the Wall St. Journal Alan Murray
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As a parent or concerned citizen, I urge you to refrain from publishing the NYC teacher data reports or posting them online.

These reports, which rate 12,700 NYC teachers based solely on the 2010 test scores of their students, filtered through a complicated value-added formula, are seen by most experts as highly unreliable, based on false or incomplete data and with huge margins of error.

Even the panel of "technical experts" handpicked by DOE said they could not endorse the method's use "for accountability, promotion or tenure" purposes. They pointed out that "test scores capture only one dimension of teacher effectiveness, and they are not intended to serve as a summary measure of teacher performance" and that "there are likely to be additional factors not yet considered that influence student achievement."

There is no other profession in the public or private sector in which this kind of unreliable and potentially damaging information is made public in the press. The main effect of publishing these reports would be to further undermine teacher morale -- already at an all-time low in this city.

Sincerely yours,