Petition Closed
Petitioning Boston City Council
This petition will be delivered to:
Boston City Council

Legalize Chickens in Boston

The current permitting process for backyard chickens makes it nearly impossible to legally and responsibly have a backyard flock. The City's permitting process should more easily allow a small number of backyard hens for the following reasons:

-- Chickens produce a rich fertilizer by-product, high in nitrogen, eliminating the need for petrochemical fertilizers.

 -- Chickens eat insects, including ticks, reducing our backyard pest population, and allowing for reduced use of pesticides.

-- Backyard hens provide an educational opportunity to teach children where our food comes from and demonstrate responsible pet ownership.

 -- Fresh, naturally raised eggs have an improved nutrient profile compared to conventional eggs.

 -- Chickens eat table scraps, reducing municipal solid waste.

-- A properly cleaned and maintained chicken coop poses no sanitation risks.

By amending the permitting process to allow residents to keep a limited number of hens in residential zones, the City of Boston will encourage stewardship of the environment and food production on a household scale, in line with the City's goals for environmental sustainability and support of local food.


Letter to
Boston City Council
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Boston City Council.

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Legalize Chickens in Boston

The current permitting process for backyard chickens makes it nearly impossible to legally and responsibly have a backyard flock. The City's permitting process should more easily allow a small number of backyard hens for the following reasons:

-- Chickens produce a rich fertilizer by-product, high in nitrogen, eliminating the need for petrochemical fertilizers.
-- Chickens eat insects, including ticks, reducing our backyard pest population, and allowing for reduced use of pesticides.
-- Backyard hens provide an educational opportunity to teach children where our food comes from and demonstrate responsible pet ownership.
-- Fresh, naturally raised eggs have an improved nutrient profile compared to conventional eggs.
-- Chickens eat table scraps, reducing municipal solid waste.
-- A properly cleaned and maintained chicken coop poses no sanitation risks.

By amending the permitting process to allow residents to keep a limited number of hens in residential zones, the City of Boston will encourage stewardship of the environment and food production on a household scale, in line with the City's goals for environmental sustainability and support of local food.


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Sincerely,