Petition Closed
Petitioning Your Governor

Animal cruelty/ordinance surcharge for spay/neuter services

1,308
Supporters

Homeless companion animals is a nation wide problem. Florida spent $94 million dollars to operate animal control in 2008-one year alone. California spends annually about a half BILLION a year. Across the USA, about $2 billion YEARLY is spent on animal control.  Needless to say what to do with unwanted animals is costly, but why so many homeless throw away pets? ~Number One Reason: COST of spay/neutering is not affordable to most.~

The impact of homeless/unwanted pets is quite staggering and epidemic, affecting the State's economy, public safety and community health-homeless animals never get vet treatment and rabies/other communicable diseases are realities.

Homeless animals are also frequently victims of ANIMAL CRUELTY-thugs kick, torture, kill them because nobody looks out for them. For every animal cruelty case reported it costs law enforcement much man power and funds to investigate and to prosecute. SPAY NEUTERING SAVES MONEY by PREVENTING this! Countless trailer parks, abandoned allies, etc are over run with homeless cats, which also poses problems for schools, and other communities.

Solution:  Low cost and free spay and neutering programs are cut from budgets, which is rapidly fueling the pet overpopulation explosion:  Funds for spay/neuter programs can be provided by adding a surcharge of $20 from EACH animal cruelty/animal ordinance violation-per charge.

Breast, uterine, prostate cancers prevented with spay/neutering:

http://pets.webmd.com/cats/infection-tumors-breast-cancer-cats

"Breast cancer is rare among spayed females, especially those neutered before their first heat cycle. Early spaying reduces the risk factors sevenfold. Breast tumors occur frequently in unspayed cats. Eighty percent are malignant (adenocarcinoma). The rest are benign adenomas. Breast cancer is the third most common cancer in cats. Most affected cats are unspayed females over 6 years old." Dogs also suffer breast cancers; male cats and dogs also suffer reproductive cancers which neutering prevents drastically. With less homeless animals there will be less animal cruelty.

Thank you for your time and reading.

Sincerely,

 

Letter to
Your Governor
Re: Animal cruelty/ordinance surcharge for spay/neuter services

Homeless companion animals is a nation wide problem. Florida spent $94 million dollars to operate animal control in 2008-one year alone. California spends annually about a half BILLION a year. Across the USA, about $2 billion YEARLY is spent on animal control. Needless to say what to do with unwanted animals is costly, but why so many homeless throw away pets? ~Number One Reason: COST of spay/neutering is not affordable to most.~

The impact of homeless/unwanted pets is quite staggering and epidemic, affecting the State's economy, public safety and community health-homeless animals never get vet treatment and rabies/other communicable diseases are realities.

Homeless animals are also frequently victims of ANIMAL CRUELTY-thugs kick, torture, kill them because nobody looks out for them. For every animal cruelty case reported it costs law enforcement much man power and funds to investigate and to prosecute. SPAY NEUTERING SAVES MONEY by PREVENTING this! Countless trailer parks, abandoned allies, etc are over run with homeless cats, which also poses problems for schools, and other communities.

Solution: Low cost and free spay and neutering programs are cut from budgets, which is rapidly fueling the pet overpopulation explosion: Funds for spay/neuter programs can be provided by adding a surcharge of $20 from EACH animal cruelty/animal ordinance violation-per charge.

Breast, uterine, prostate cancers prevented with spay/neutering:

http://pets.webmd.com/cats/infection-tumors-breast-cancer-cats

"Breast cancer is rare among spayed females, especially those neutered before their first heat cycle. Early spaying reduces the risk factors sevenfold. Breast tumors occur frequently in unspayed cats. Eighty percent are malignant (adenocarcinoma). The rest are benign adenomas. Breast cancer is the third most common cancer in cats. Most affected cats are unspayed females over 6 years old." Dogs also suffer breast cancers; male cats and dogs also suffer reproductive cancers which neutering prevents drastically. With less homeless animals there will be less animal cruelty.

Thank you for your time and reading.

Sincerely,