Confirmed victory

Could you imagine suffering torture five different times, only to be told that no protection from your torturers was allowed because you missed a deadline to apply?  And what if you missed the deadline because you were still recovering from the last attack?

Blanca Medina doesn't have to imagine what that would be like.  She sought safety in the United States after suffering five rapes.  Because of medical complications relating to those rapes, Blanca missed a hearing to apply for protection and was ordered deported.  An Immigration and Customs Enforcement team tracked Blanca down and detained her, separating her from her four-year-old daughter Alejandra.

Blanca told ICE that she and Alejandra faced severe harm if deported.  She asked for permission to at least explain how she and her daughter could be persecuted.  ICE used a strange procedural rule to assert that it simply did not have to listen.  Under ICE rules, it is free to ignore even conclusive proof that a person would suffer slow death by torture if deported.  This "willful blindness" policy could be ended through simple procedural changes by the Department of Homeland Security.

Until the procedure is fixed, Blanca (and thousands of moms like her) face deportation with no hope of finding protection from persecution or torture.  Join us in asking the U.S. government to end this policy of willful blindness to torture and persecution, and allow reasonable fear interviews for all who face deportation.

Thank you,

Alejandra's Team

Letter to
ICE San Francisco FIeld Office Director Timothy Aitken
Director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement John Morton
Senator Dianne Feinstein
and 1 other
Senator Barbara Boxer
I am writing to ask you to please stop the deportation of Alejandra's mom Blanca Medina (A# 099-533-227), and allow her an interview to determine whether she might face persecution or torture if returned to El Salvador.

Blanca suffered five rapes before seeking protection in the United States. Due to complications from those rapes, Blanca missed her immigration hearing and was ordered deported. She was later apprehended by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Blanca asked for a hearing or interview to explain the fears of persecution she had for herself and her U.S. citizen daughter, should they be forced back to El Salvador. But due to an odd procedural rule, ICE asserted that it would not listen or allow her a "reasonable fear interview" to establish that she would be persecuted.

Under current ICE rules, ICE is free to ignore even conclusive proof that a person would suffer slow death by torture if deported. This "willful blindness" policy could be ended through simple procedural changes by the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice. No statutory amendments are needed.

Until the procedure is fixed, Blanca (and thousands of moms like her) face deportation with no hope of finding protection from persecution or torture. Please end this policy of willful blindness to torture and persecution, and allow reasonable fear interviews for all who face deportation.

Blanca and Alejandra thank you kindly for your consideration.

Respectfully,