Topic

animal welfare

695 petitions

Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to David Caretto, Jeff Mathieu, San Bernardino County Government Officials, Mayor Big Bear Lake, Randall Putz, Bob Jackowski, Bill Jahn, Nishalet Wilson, Kelly Papp, Greg Beck, Big Bear Chamber of Commerce, City of Big Bear Lake, Sarah M. Siep, Kathleen Smith, Robert Dalquest, Big Bear Lake Planning Commission, James Ramos, Dan Silverman, Robert Lovingood, Mike Ramos, Brian Cronin, Kelly Papp, Christopher Covington, Trudy Raymundo, CaSonya Thomas, Debi Pasco, Gary Mcbride, Supervisor Rutherford, Supervisor Ramos, Supervisor Lovingood, Supervisor Mitzelfelt, Susan Michl, Corwin Porter

We Declare Big Bear "No Kill" & Demand City & County Officials Update Policies Now!

Big Bear No Kill Declaration (provided by the www.NoKillAdvocacyCenter.org)This year, some three million animals will be killed in shelters. The vast majority can and should be placed into loving homes or should never enter shelters in the first place. But there is hope. No Kill sheltering models, based on innovative, non-lethal programs and services, have already saved the lives of tens of thousands of animals. But instead of embracing No Kill, many shelters—and their national agency allies—cling to their failed models of the past, models that result in the killing of millions of animals in U.S. shelters every year. No Kill is a revolution. And behind every revolution is a declaration—a statement of grievances, and a listing of rights and principles that underscore our great hope for the future. We assert that a No Kill nation is within our reach—that the killing can and should be brought to an end. Join us in endorsing The Declaration of the No Kill Movement in the United States. It is open to every individual, every group, and every agency that wants to bring about an end to the killing by implementing the programs and services that will establish a No Kill nation. Programs like allowing rescue groups to save animals on death row and offsite adoption events. These are not radical concepts, but in the current sheltering world, one can be ostracized for daring to proclaim the simple truths that population control killing is not an act of kindness and that free-living animals have a right to live. ​Join us in speaking for those who can’t. In the length of time it will take you to read the Declaration, nearly one hundred animals will be needlessly killed. I. Big Bear No Kill Preamble​One hundred and fifty years ago, societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals and other humane organizations were founded to establish standards for humane treatment of animals, to promote their rights, and to protect them from harm. This marked the formal beginning of the humane movement in the United States. The scope and influence of these early humane organizations were testament to the public’s concern for animals. It did not take long for them to set their sights on the abuse of homeless animals and cruel methods of killing by public pounds. It was common practice at the time for city and town dogcatchers to beat, drown, or shoot homeless animals. Many humane agencies responded by entering into animal control contracts with towns and cities to ensure that the killing was done more humanely. But in taking on municipal animal control duties, these agencies abandoned their lifesaving and life-enhancing platforms when those beliefs conflicted with their contractual responsibilities. In the current era, where laws require killing by even more “humane” methods, these contradictions have become starker. Increasingly, the practices of both humane societies and municipal animal control agencies are out of step with public sentiment. Today, most Americans hold the humane treatment of animals as a personal value, which is reflected in our laws, cultural practices, the proliferation of organizations founded for animal protection, increased per capita spending on animal care, and great advancements in veterinary medicine. But the agencies that the public expects to protect animals are instead killing some four million animals annually. Lifesaving alternatives to the mass killing of animals in shelters have existed for decades. These lifesaving methods are based on innovative, humane, nonlethal programs and services that have proven that the killing can be brought to an end. Too many of these agencies, however, remain mired in the kill philosophies of the past, unwilling to or hampered from exploring and adopting methods that save lives. This is a breach of their public trust, a gross deviation from their responsibility to protect animals, and a point of view that we, as caring people and a humane community, can no longer accept or tolerate. We assert that a No Kill nation is within our reach—that the killing can and must be brought to an end. It is up to each of us working individually and together to implement sheltering models that have already saved tens of thousands of animals in progressive communities. If we work together—with certainty of purpose, assured of our own success, with the commitment that “what must be done, will be done”—the attainment of our goals will not be far off. II. Big Bear No Kill ResolutionWhereas, the right to live is every animal’s most basic and fundamental right; Whereas, societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals and other humane organizations were founded to establish standards for humane treatment of animals, to promote their rights, and to protect them from harm; Whereas, traditional sheltering practices allow the mass killing of sheltered animals; Whereas, every year shelters in the United States are killing millions of animals who could be saved, and are also killing millions of free-living animals who do not belong in shelters; Whereas, life always takes precedence over expediency; Whereas, the No Kill movement in the United States has successfully implemented new and innovative programs that provide alternatives to mass killing; Whereas, lifesaving change will come about only if No Kill programs are embraced and further developed; Whereas, failure to implement No Kill programs constitutes a breach of the public’s trust in the sheltering community; Now, therefore, be it resolved that No Kill policies and procedures are the only legitimate foundation for animal sheltering; and, it is incumbent upon all shelters and animal groups to embrace the philosophy of No Kill, to immediately begin implementing programs and services that will end the mass killing of sheltered animals, and to reject the failed kill-oriented practices of the past. III. Big Bear Statement of RightsWe acknowledge the following:• Sheltered animals have a right to live;• Free-living animals have a right to their lives and their habitats;• Animals, rescuers, and the public have a right to expect animal protection organizations and animal shelters to do everything in their power to promote, protect, and advocate for the lives of animals;• Animal protection groups, rescue groups, and No Kill shelters have a right to take into their custody animals who would otherwise be killed by animal shelters;• Taxpayers and community members have a right to have their government spend tax monies on programs and services whose purpose is to save and enhance the lives of all animals;• Taxpayers and community members have a right to full and complete disclosure about how animal shelters operate. IV. Big Bear Guiding PrinciplesNo Kill is achieved only by guaranteeing the following:• Life to all healthy animals, and to all sick, injured or traumatized animals where medical or behavioral intervention would alter a poor or grave prognosis;• The right of sanctuary for aggressive dogs where behavior intervention cannot alter a poor or grave prognosis;• The right of free-living animals to live in their habitats; ​These conditions can be achieved only through adherence to the following:• Shelters and humane groups end the killing of savable animals;• Every animal in a shelter receives individual consideration, regardless of how many animals a shelter takes in, or whether such animals are healthy, underaged, elderly, sick, injured, traumatized, or not social with humans;• Shelters and humane organizations discontinue the use of language that misleads the public and glosses over the nature of their actions, such as “euthanasia,” “unadoptable,” “fractious,” “putting them to sleep,” and other euphemisms that downplay the gravity of ending life and make the task of killing easier;• Shelters are open to the public during hours that permit working people to reclaim or adopt animals during nonworking hours;• Public shelters work with humane animal adoption organizations to the fullest extent to promote the adoption of animals and to reduce the rate of killing;• Shelters provide care and treatment for all animals in shelters to the extent necessary, including prompt veterinary care, adequate nutrition, shelter, exercise, and socialization;• Shelters are held accountable for and make information publicly available about all the animals in their care. V. Big Bear No Kill StandardsThe implementation of these lifesaving procedures, policies, and programs must be the immediate goal of every shelter, and animal control and animal welfare agency:• Formal, active commitment by shelter directors, management, and staff to lifesaving programs and policies, and dedication to promptly ending mass killing of shelter animals;• Immediate implementation of the following programs by all publicly funded or subsidized animal shelters:•• A foster care network for underaged, traumatized, sick, injured, or other animals needing refuge before any sheltered animal is killed, unless the prognosis for rehabilitation of that individual animal is poor or grave;•• Comprehensive adoption programs that operate during weekend and evening hours and include offsite adoption venues;•• Medical and behavioral rehabilitation programs;•• Pet retention programs to solve medical, environmental, or behavioral problems and keep animals with their caring and responsible caregivers;•• Programs to release free-living animals back to their habitats;•• Rescue group right of access to shelter animals;•• Volunteer programs to socialize animals, promote adoptions, and help in the operations of the shelter;•• Documentation that all efforts to save an animal have been considered, including medical and behavioral rehabilitation, foster care, rescue groups, re-release, and adoption.• An end to the policy of accepting trapped free-living animals to be destroyed as unadoptable, and implementation of re-release programs;• Abolishment of trapping, lending traps to the public to capture animals, and support of trapping by shelters, governments, and pest control companies for the purposes of removing animals to be killed;• An end to “owner”-requested killing of animals unless the shelter has made an independent determination that the animal is irremediably suffering;• The repeal of unenforceable and counter-productive animal control ordinances such as cat licensing and leash laws, pet limit laws, bans on feeding stray animals, and bans on specific breeds. Please also sign the nationwide "No Kill Declaration" by clicking here. INFORMATIVE LINKSDoes Your Community's Shelter Measure Up?No Kill 101Economic Benefits of No Kill Animal ControlWe Can Do It! Adopt Your Way Out of KillingThe Myth of Pet OverpopulationA Guide for Legislators & Policy MakersDefining No KillHelping Community DogsThe No Kill Revoluntion Starts With YOU!Countering The OppositionThere Out To Be a Shelter Reform LawLegal Rights of Rescuers and VolunteersSuperhero For Animal SheltersThe Companion Animal Protection ActThe Animal Rescue ActThe Prevention of Cruelty To Animals ActThe Family Standard of Care and Protection ActPerserving Life: Protecting FamiliesWhat Shelters Owe Traumatized AnimalsNo Dog Left Behind: We Can Save Them AllCalculating An Animal Shelter's Live Release RateAnimal Matrix: Policies and ProceduresProtecting Community CatsBreak The Chains: Model Anti-Tethering Legislation Dear Mayor, City Manager and City Council, We now have a solution to animal shelter killing and it is not difficult, expensive, or beyond practical means to achieve. No Kill is a humane, sustainable, cost-effective model that allows open admission animal control shelters to save all healthy and treatable animals. Unlike the “adopt some and kill the rest” form of animal sheltering that dominates in the United States and is responsible for the needless killing of millions of animals every year, municipal No Kill shelters are saving as much as 99% of all animals entrusted to their care. By working with people, embracing lifesaving programs, and treating each life as precious, a shelter can transform itself. Here’s a free film that highlights several communities which have made the transition: https://vimeo.com/183035642 Here are free guides that demonstrate how they did it, including model policies and procedures for the operation of a municipal, No Kill animal shelter: https://goo.gl/V8rBc8 And here’s even more good news: the more animals a community shelter saves, the more money people in the community spend on those animals. A University of Denver study found that the total dollar value of additional spending and other economic impact realized by one city over a 6-year period as a result of passing a No Kill ordinance was over $150,000,000. Saving lives not only makes ethical sense; it makes dollars and cents: https://goo.gl/XA2yBL The No Kill Advocacy Center has helped numerous communities in their transition to No Kill and they can help ours, too. Please do not hesitate to contact them: https://www.nokilladvocacycenter.org

Ted Trent
9,417 supporters
Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to Dr. Alex Azar, Dr. Sonny Perdue, Ryan Zinke, Dr. Robert Wilkie, General James Mattis, Dr. Francis Collins, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Dr. David Skorton, Dr. Robert Redfield, Rep. Ken Calvert, Jackie Walorski

Retire dogs, cats & monkeys from government labs!

In 2014, I adopted my best friend Violet from the basement of a taxpayer-funded animal experimentation lab. Now, I’m working with Congress to get dogs like her, as well as cats and monkeys, released from government labs at the end of experiments.  When I met Violet, she lived alone in a cage in a laboratory basement.  She had never been outside, never seen stairs and most of her experiences with humans involved fear and pain. She loved other dogs but was understandably terrified of humans. Now, we’re inseparable, and she’s best friends with our cats and even helps us foster kittens! But, Violet is one of the lucky ones. Thousands of cats, monkeys and dogs like her are experimented on each year in government labs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Agriculture (USDA), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of the Interior (DOI), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Smithsonian Institution. Because its quicker and easier than relocating them to rescue groups, private homes or sanctuaries, experimenters usually kill these animals and dispose of them like trash, even if they’re healthy.  Now, the taxpayers who bought these animals want them released. Recently, our organization White Coat Waste Project has secured the release of monkeys from the FDA, and is working to get dogs out of VA labs and kittens released by the USDA.  Please join me in urging all government agencies to #GiveThemBack: retire and release animals at the end of taxpayer-funded experiments! --Julie Germany, Board Member, White Coat Waste Project

White Coat Waste Project
1,209,239 supporters
Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, Secretary Wilkie

Dogs need your help! Tell Congress to stop cruel taxpayer-funded experiments.

UPDATE (March 2018): Following your efforts, U.S. Congress enacted a law to de-fund the VA's dog experiments for 2018 and placed dramatic restrictions on the practice. Read more here. We're still working to end this waste and abuse for good! --- An investigation by White Coat Waste Project revealed that more than 1,100 beagles, hounds and mixed-breed dogs—even puppies—are subjected to secretive, wasteful and cruel experiments inside government laboratories each year. As a physician, researcher and dog-lover –and someone who once reluctantly experimented on dogs—I know there’s no way to defend the government’s use of dogs for invasive and unnecessary experiments.  It’s also a betrayal of a 10,000 year old bond between dogs and humans built upon mutual affection and loyalty. The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times and other major news outlets have been documenting how the Department of Veterans Affairs, Pentagon, National Institutes of Health, and other agencies spend taxpayers’ money to abuse dogs: Death by Sand Flies: Infected sand flies are strapped to beagles’ bare skin, causing painful ulcers. Forced Vomiting: Dogs are cut open, their nerves severed, and electrodes are implanted on their intestines. They're then forced to vomit repeatedly. Forced Heart Attacks: "Snares" are tightened around dogs’ coronary arteries to induce heart attacks before they're killed and dissected. American taxpayers are forced to pay millions of dollars for these studies with virtually no access to information about what’s being done or why and how much it costs. Is this how you want your money spent? Please sign our petition to end wasteful spending and increase transparency and accountability about taxpayer-funded experiments on dogs! Most agencies including the VA, DOD, FDA and CDC do not reveal details of how our taxpayer dollars are being used for experiments on dogs, but on one of the few projects for which spending data is available, NIH experimenters have used nearly $6 million of taxpayers' money since 2011 to give dogs heart attacks. Bipartisan Members of Congress also recognize the ethical, scientific and economic problems with these controversial experiments on dogs. They’re now working to help spare dogs from abuse and cut wasteful government spending. Please join us and encourage Members of Congress and the administration to end this wasteful government spending on flawed research.

White Coat Waste Project
736,568 supporters
Update posted 4 days ago

Petition to Gavin Newsom, Kevin Mullin, Chad Mayes, Nancy Skinner, Anthony Rendon, Ian C. Calderon, Kevin de León, Bill Monning

Outlaw Horse Racing In California

Upward of 2,000 horses die on American racetracks every year. In 2016, there were roughly 170 deaths on California tracks alone. (horseracingwrongs.com) All to serve people’s desire to place a $2 bet. Despite the typical opening day festivities with ladies in fancy garb and big hats, there is nothing glamorous about horse racing. Racetracks are battlefields where horses pay with their lives for our entertainment. How can we justify a spectacle in which an animal gets instantly euthanized for merely spraining an ankle or breaking a leg? Racehorses are tormented and tortured for the sole purpose of generating profits for their owners and race promoters. How is this, the so-called “Sport of Kings”, still legal? It wasn’t that long ago that another blood sport - greyhound racing - was legal in much of the United States. A more enlightened view has emerged that rightly recognizes it for what it truly is; cruel, inhumane and exploitative. Animal activists and advocates have fought long and hard to render it illegal in 40 states and counting. Similarly, horse racing should be outlawed. Regulations to improve treatment of horses and reduce their rate of death are ineffective, as they are neither followed nor enforced. Frankly, given the money at stake, there are huge incentives to cheat at the track, as well as recklessly breed horses for speed to the detriment of their general health. The only answer is complete abolishment of the horse racing industry. California can pave the way for other states by being the first to pass legislation making horse racing illegal. Please join me in calling upon California lawmakers to ban horse racing, as well as gambling on horse racing, in the State of California.

Horseracing Wrongs Inc.
97,610 supporters