Get rid of Licence required to collect Sea shells and fossil sharks teeth on SC waterways!

Get rid of Licence required to collect Sea shells and fossil sharks teeth on SC waterways!

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John Taylor started this petition to South Carolina State Senate and

It doesn't matter where you're from, if you want to collect seashells and shark's teeth in South Carolina with out a LIcence, please sign this petition! Everyone around the world should be able to legally enjoy collecting seashells and fossil shark's teeth. In South Carolina, you actually need a license to collect SEASHELLS (Eco facts) and FOSSIL SHARK TEETH below average low tide, whether collecting on the beach, river banks, snorkeling, wading in the water, or diving. On the entire eastern seaboard, South Carolina is the only state that requires a license to collect seashells and fossil sharks teeth. This is a huge red flag when it comes to government overreach into our families' personal lives, and our community's recreational activities.

With this licence, you are required to report the location of every seashell and shark tooth you find every three months. You are required to submit this report every three months, whether you found something or not. You must also report these items no later than 10 days after the quarter. If you forget to submit a report, you are given a one-time 6 month probationary licence as a warning. If you forget again, you will be banned for life. This is what happened to the "Shark Tooth Fairy," Mike Harris. This punishment is more severe than a DUI! Approximately 15-20 tickets are given out to collectors annually. This severe law makes criminals of good people and children! According to Jim Knight, the previous natural history curator for the SC State Museum, whom I had lunch with on OCT 25 2018, Stated "Not one species has been scientifically described or published from the hobby reports in my 24 years of employment." Nor have any species from the hobby reports been published by Dave Cicimurri, the paleontologist at the state museum. Yet they still take punitive measures against people. This license is a way to charge people for a freedom that they should already have, and it has been a burden to the people of South Carolina since the 1970's.
The Mike Harris annual Shark Tooth Hunt (picture of 2 boys attending above) is an educational event held in Port Royal, and it is the largest fossil hunt in the world, with an attendance of over 2000 people. The event is partnered with the March of Dimes and creating awareness for Reaching Milestones (who works with children with autism). This law is overly burdensome and affects divers who want to dive for sharks teeth to supply the event. It also affects children and families at the event, requiring them to fill out reports and obtain a license to collect seashells and shark's teeth below average low tide on the day of. This mandatory reporting law should not take precedence over the more important things in life, such as military personnel returning home on vacation, people who can't dive because of intermittent physical problems, and people who are trying to make a memory with their families. Another issue with this law is requiring guests from, either another state, or country, to apply for a license 4 to 6 weeks ahead of time. Most of these guests are not even aware of such a requirement until they are already here on their vacation. We have been hunters and gatherers since the beginning of time.This law is completely unreasonable, and We the People want our birthright back!

Fun Facts:
One shark loses approximately 20,000 teeth in its lifetime, multiply that by millions of sharks, since the dawn of time, that's a whole lot of sharks teeth in the world!

It is a well known fact, that once a fossil is exposed to the elements it rapidly deteriorates. Therefore an uncollected fossil is a
destroyed fossil.

Sea shells far exceed the number of fossil shark teeth in the world. The seashells on the SC coast are from recent to approximately 40,000 years old. Anything over 10,000 years is considered to be a fossil.

An artifact in SC is something altered by man, and more than 50 years old. An ecofact, or biofact, is defined as the unmodified biological remains of something used by man, but unaltered by man, such as a seashell used for decoration, drinking water, or mixing dyes, etc. It is impossible for the average person, or even professionals, to determine the age or use of an unaltered seashell while collecting on the beach.

0 have signed. Let’s get to 5,000!
At 5,000 signatures, this petition is more likely to get picked up by local news!