Demand Georgetown reduce undergraduate tuition contribution and extend deferral deadline

Demand Georgetown reduce undergraduate tuition contribution and extend deferral deadline

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We demand that Georgetown extend the gap year/LOA deadline and reduce the tuition contribution of every undergraduate student accordingly to reflect severity of imposed restrictions on academic & extracurricular discourse in contrast to past semesters. For $28,000 a semester, we the students and customers expect to receive a world-class education supported by in-class debates, healthy discussions outside the classroom, field trips to engage with primary source material, and extra-curricular enrichment, among a number of other factors. According to the announced plan, the 2020-2021 school year will clearly exclude most of these pre-established conditions for a full financial exchange assumed in contract. A Zoom education taken either in your dorm room or your parents' basement is objectively not worth a $28,000 per semester commitment. Additionally on January 23rd, Georgetown communicated to undergraduate students that it would be raising the cost of tuition by 3.5% for the 2020-2021 year, and has not taken action to freeze this tuition increase post-COVID19. According to affordablecollegesonline.org, the average American undergraduate online semester tuition is $16,580 in contrast with the average on-campus tuition of $28,600. This article written in the Harvard Crimson on June 23rd explains the value proposition of a virtual education well, and the subsequent need for a reduction from the full price of tuition. Charging full price without articulating a leave of absence or gap year policy is, to put it frankly, highway robbery and sets students up for failure and/or financial distress in a depressed economy. Students should have the option to postpone enrollment for a semester or year if they decide that for whatever reason, they do not feel comfortable with this 2020-2021 plan decided on by the administration and likely co-developed with McKinsey & Co according to an anonymous source familiar with the matter. In an interview with the Washington Post on 7/6, when asked about an updated tuition policy for the year, President John DeGioia responded "We haven’t brought closure to that yet". One way a tuition reduction could be effectively implemented is by a plan similar to MIT, giving a substantial financial grant to all students. This circumvents financial aid requirements such as fixed expected family contributions, and allows all students to benefit from an effective tuition reduction. There is no moment better fit for Georgetown to tap its $200 million in liquid, unrestricted endowment investment assets in the middle of an unprecedented pandemic emergency. It must take the aforementioned actions to preserve the integrity of its institution and especially protect its most vulnerable undergraduates, or else the treasured motto of Cura Personalis is nothing more than a buzzword.