Remove Racist Mural at Grandin Train Station

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This mural at Grandin Train Station in Edmonton, Alberta, is racist and depicts images of the residential school system. These types of images are a painful reminder to our indigenous community, that the government allowed children to be stolen from their parents, assimilated, and physically and sexually abused, even murdered by the priests and nuns who ran these places. How is it even possible that images such as these are still allowed to be displayed at all? It’s outrageous! It needs to be removed immediately. A reminder of such huge and disgusting stain on our history, should not be allowed to be so proudly displayed. It’s a slap in the face to anyone who was impacted by the events depicted in this mural. 

Additional information 

On the city of Edmonton website, there is a bit explained about the mural. I’d like to share a quote from that website:

“The original mural, painted by Nadeau in 1989 was commissioned in order to celebrate the historical contributions of Alberta’s Francophone community and particularly Bishop Vital Grandin. However, many felt that the imagery of the original evoked the troubling history of the residential schools.”

Firstly, this painting was commissioned to celebrate/glorify the contribution of the Francophone community here in Alberta, and specifically the priest in the mural, Vital Grandin. The whole station is named after him. A person, with his nun, depicted looking proud of themselves for stealing a baby from their family. The whole station should get a shiny new name. I understand that some work and discussion had been done in trying to change the narrative of the actual story depicted there, such as adding additional murals beside this one. 

 

One of the people who have commented on this petition said that “if anything, this mural belongs in a museum depicting the genocide of aboriginal communities.” Which is an amazing idea. Put it somewhere where it can be used to educate people who are maybe unaware of the past and even present injustices that indigenous people have faced. Instead, commission more indigenous artists to paint their truth about their own history the way that they want it to come across, through their own eyes.