Petition Closed

2,721
Supporters

Horses are not Entertainers. They are used in competitive sports including, but not limited to, dressage, endurance riding, eventing, reining, show jumping, tent pegging, vaulting, polo, horse racing, driving, and rodeo.

Equestrian Eventing: The Olympics’ Most Dangerous Sport:
The cross country course design has become too challenging,” says Dene Stanstall, the horse consultant for U.K. non-profit Animal Aid. “They risk breaking the horses’ necks or backs. "Stanstall says a more direct focus on horse safety is needed. 'There is a moral question here. Is it sport to put horses lives in danger?

Organized welfare groups
criticised some horse sports with claims of animal cruelty.

 

Jump horse racing (also known as national hunt racing) is a popular sport in Europe, in which horses jump over obstacles on a man-made course. This sport is often very harmful to the horse's health as they are subjected to painful whipping, injuries as a result of rigorous training methods, and death in favor of animal or human consumption of the horses' meat.

Any sport in which innocent creatures are sacrificed in the name of human entertainment should be banned altogether. Unless those involved with jump racing can attest that horses are no longer being harmed in any way, this cruel and sick form of amusement should be completely illegal.

Breeding
For years, horses have been bred to run fast. As a result, thoroughbreds have oversized frames and undersized legs. They are so fragile that injuries are commonplace. Furthermore, inbreeding causes genetic defects among racehorses.

Drugs 
Horses are often made dependent on the drugs that their veterinarians and trainers provide. While the drugs may relieve symptoms such as bleeding and pain, they do not treat the underlying problems. Instead, they are used to keep horses who are too injured to race on the track. Legal drugs are also used to mask the presence of illegal drugs injected into the horse. 

Frequently Administered Drugs

  • Lasix  
  • Bute 
  • Steroids 

Injuries
Horses are frequently made to race at the age of two. Since their bones have not fully developed at that point, injuries are common. In addition, many are raced so often that their joints and bones deteriorate. Steeple chasing is designed to make horses fall; this sometimes results in death or serious injury for which the animal is euthanized. 

Common Injuries

  • Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage, i.e. blood in the horse’s lungs and windpipe 
  • Lameness 
  • Knee fractures 
  • Ligament sprains 
  • Joint sprains 
  • Shin soreness 
  • Hairline fractures 

Transportation to Slaughter
Horses are placed in double-decker trucks which are too low for them to even stand up straight. They are not given food or water, or even allowed to stop and rest. “Owners” do not want to spend money on painkillers so those animals with a broken leg or other injury must suffer the entire trip without any anesthetic. Since horses must be alive when they arrive at the slaughterhouse in order to be used for human consumption, even animals in excruciating pain will not be euthanized. 

Regulations
Horseracing is effectively excluded from all anti-cruelty laws. Individual states are supposed to be regulating the industry through their own racing commissions. Since the racing commission is a state agency, state prosecutors are disinclined toward pursuing cruelty cases against it. Moreover, because each state receives revenue from its tracks, states are unlikely to hold industry insiders to very strict standards. 

After Racing, horses are often

  • Killed for human consumption overseas 
  • Made into dog food 
  • Used to produce glue 
  • Murdered by their “owners” who then file fraudulent insurance claims. 

You Can Help

  • Do not patronize racetracks 
  • Distribute anti-horseracing information outside of racetracks 
  • Lobby against the construction of new racetracks 
  • Educate others about the cruelty involved in horseracing

 

We urge the International Olympic Commitee to ban all Horse competitions from the Olympic Games.
We urge the Governments to  ban all horse racing and deadly horse jumping.

please sign and share!

Letter to
ASSOCIATION OF NATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEES ASSOCIATION OF NATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEES
Deutscher Olympischer Sportbund Deutscher Olympischer Sportbund
german Government Angela Merkel
and 9 others
european Union european Union
Asian Racing Federation Asian Racing Federation
European Federation of Thoroughbred Breeders' Associations European Federation of Thoroughbred Breeders' Associations
Jockey club Argentino Jockey club Argentino
Das Direktorium für Vollblutzucht und Rennen e. V. Das Direktorium für Vollblutzucht und Rennen e. V.
British Horseracing Authority British Horseracing Authority
Canadian Sport Horse Association Canadian Sport Horse Association
Federation Share Fédération Équestre Internationale Federation Share Fédération Équestre Internationale
Bundesverband für Pferdesport und Pferdezucht Bundesverband für Pferdesport und Pferdezucht
Horses are not Entertainers. They are used in competitive sports including, but not limited to, dressage, endurance riding, eventing, reining, show jumping, tent pegging, vaulting, polo, horse racing, driving, and rodeo.


Equestrian Eventing: The Olympics’ Most Dangerous Sport:
The cross country course design has become too challenging,” says Dene Stanstall, the horse consultant for U.K. non-profit Animal Aid. “They risk breaking the horses’ necks or backs. "Stanstall says a more direct focus on horse safety is needed. 'There is a moral question here. Is it sport to put horses lives in danger?

Organized welfare groups
criticised some horse sports with claims of animal cruelty.


Horses begin training or are already racing when their skeletal systems are still growing and are unprepared to handle the pressures of running on a hard track at high speeds.5 Improved medical treatment and technological advancements have done little to remedy the plight of the racehorse. Between 700 and 800 racehorses are injured and die every year, with a national average of about two breakdowns for every 1,000 starts. Strained tendons or hairline fractures can be tough for veterinarians to diagnose, and the damage may go from minor to irreversible at the next race or workout. Horses do not handle surgery well, as they tend to be disoriented when coming out of anesthesia, and they may fight casts or slings, possibly causing further injury. Many are euthanized in order to save the owners further veterinary fees and other expenses for horses who will never race again.
I urge you to ban all Horse racing and deadly Horse jumping..

Sincerely,