To enforce a designated wildlife area speed limit in the UK to eliminate wildlife injuries

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As a local resident within a national park location in East Sussex, England, the number of wildlife injuries and fatalities that I witness due to road traffic collisions are astonishing.  The casualties and fatalities range from rabbits and birds to deer, badger, owls and more. 

The cause of the vast majority of wildlife traffic collisions is due to uncontrollable speed on the roads within highly populated wildlife areas which are often highlighted with caution road signage. 

All animals have the capacity to experience pain, fear, distress and trauma in the same way that a human can. With this in mind, why do we protect highly populated pedestrianised areas and not highly populated wildlife areas?

According to the statistics of safe speed.org.uk, if a pedestrian is hit by a moving vehicle at 40 mph they are 90% likely to be killed. If a pedestrian is hit by a moving vehicle at 30 mph they are 50% likely to be killed. If a pedestrian is hit by a moving vehicle at 20 mph they are 10% likely to be killed. If you take into consideration the difference in size, vulnerability, physique and durability of a wild British animal in comparison to a human, the consequences of being hit by a moving vehicle at 40mph are likely to be fatal every time.In addition to the trauma caused to the wildlife casualty, there is a financial cost to the assigned charity or council service who are to rescue, rehabilitate or remove the animal. 

With the above reasoning, I would like to petition for a UK wildlife speed limit of  30mph to be enforced within all highly populated wildlife areas. I would like this speed limit to be supported by speed cameras and for the offending drivers to be fined the relevant charges for speeding and all charges for the wildlife casualty medical bills.

I would like to suggest that caution and speed limit signage is present upon entrance and exit points to the zone which have to be marked prominently with signage mounted on both sides of the road with speed cameras situated within the designated wildlife areas.

As an optional punishment to a fine, I would like to suggest that the offending driver should be sent on a drivers awareness course and assigned to an obligatory voluntary day service with the local wildlife rescue team or council service who had to support the wildlife road traffic accident of which the individual caused.

http://www.safespeed.org.uk/killspeed.html



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