Congress: Declassify U.S. Role in Saudi War in Yemen

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A key reason the unauthorized U.S. role in the catastrophic Saudi war in Yemen has been allowed to continue is that U.S. media have under-reported it. A key reason U.S. media have underreported it is that the Pentagon has concealed key information from Congress, the media, and the public.

Congress has tools to press for the release of unjustly classified information. The House intelligence committee recently invoked Rule X, using its power to vote to declassify documents, the first time this key intelligence agency oversight reform provision has ever been directly used in either chamber since the intelligence agency oversight committees were created in the seventies following the revelations of intelligence agency abuses by the Church committee.

Another way was illustrated in 2013 by Senator Wyden when he questioned then director of national intelligence James Clapper about the NSA's unconstitutional warrantless spying on Americans. When Wyden posed his question to Clapper, Wyden already knew the answer because Wyden is on the Senate intelligence committee. When Clapper lied under oath, Wyden knew it immediately and everyone else who had the same information as Wyden – like Edward Snowden – also knew it immediately. Wyden's question had the effect of pushing the unjustly classified information towards public disclosure. The answer may have been classified, but the question was not.

Encourage Senators and Representatives to force out information about unauthorized U.S. participation in the catastrophic Saudi war in Yemen by signing our petition.

Here are some questions Senators and Representatives should ask in open session:

Question: What is the list of "associated forces" to Al Qaeda that the President claims he has the constitutional authority to bomb under the Al Qaeda AUMF? Which groups on the list are active in Yemen? Which groups on the list has the United States bombed in Yemen? Which groups on the list have been bombed by Saudi Arabia or the UAE in Yemen?

Question: Has any agency of the U.S. government ever armed, financed, or trained any group on the list of "associated forces" to Al Qaeda? Have they done so in Yemen? What was the Constitutional basis for this action? Has Saudi Arabia or the UAE ever armed, financed, or trained any group on the list of "associated forces" to Al Qaeda? Have they done so in Yemen? Has any agency of the United States facilitated this activity by Saudi Arabia or the UAE in any way? What was the Constitutional basis for this action?

Question: Is the United States refueling Saudi-UAE warplanes during their bombing runs against targets in Yemen which are not on the list of "associated forces" to Al Qaeda? Has it done so in the past? When did it begin doing so? Under what legal authority? What is the "specific statutory authorization" passed by Congress, as defined in the War Powers Resolution, that formed the Constitutional justification for this participation in hostilities? How many gallons of fuel has the U.S. provided to the Saudis and to the UAE for the bombing of non- AQ AUMF targets in Yemen? Which targets were bombed by Saudi-UAE warplanes that were so refueled? Were any schools, hospitals, sewage treatment plants, or residential apartment buildings bombed by warplanes that had been refueled by the U.S.? On what dates?

Question: Has any member of any agency of the United States been assigned to "command, coordinate, participate in the movement of, or accompany the regular or irregular military forces of any foreign country or government when such military forces are engaged, or there exists an imminent threat that such forces will become engaged, in hostilities" with respect to any group in Yemen that is not on the list of "associated forces" to Al Qaeda? Since that is defined as participation in hostilities in the War Powers Resolution, what was the Constitutional basis of that action? 

Question: Is any agency of the United States providing targeting information to Saudi Arabia or the UAE for the targeting of groups in Yemen which are not on the list of "associated forces" to Al Qaeda? Has it done so in the past? When did it begin doing so? Under what legal authority? What is the "specific statutory authorization" passed by Congress, as defined in the War Powers Resolution, that forms the Constitutional basis for this participation in hostilities?

Encourage your Senators and Representative to ask these questions of Administration officials in open session by signing our petition.



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