Please Release Sally the Cow to a Sanctuary

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     I am starting this petition on behalf of Sally, a rare Scottish Highland cow, who lives at the Swedish Homestead Farm in Sweden.  I am writing to express my concern that Sally will be slaughtered by her owner, Simeon Fuchs, because she has not been able to produce a calf. I learned of this situation last week when viewing Youtube videos produced by Swedish Homestead. The owner has produced several videos over the course of 2 - 3 years that chronicle his efforts to socialize and mate Sally, who is fearful and reacts to new cows and events by running away. Sally appears to be traumatized, and would likely fare much better in a Sanctuary environment where she wouldn’t need to “produce” calves or milk to survive.

     I’m a Social Worker in California who has worked with disabled, seniors, and impoverished families, people who are often viewed as not warranting equal treatment with the rest of society. I plan to further my education in the area of Veterinary Social Work and am very interested in the relationship between human and animal violence and cruelty. Most of us dote on our dogs, cats, and other pets (as do I), yet do not give a thought to the idea that the less fortunate creatures society uses for food are also sentient, intelligent, and caring - and who are shown by those who care for and study them to have complex social networks, commitments with one another, and unique roles in maintaining ecological balance. Imagine if your life was nothing more than serving as a source of food for those with more power (humans) - or being a dairy cow on a production line all your life, with your babies are taken from you to be killed for veal, while the milk that your body naturally produces for those babies goes to human children. I’m aware that Sally has not lived the horrors of factory farming, though she is seen as nothing more than a source of food and income production. Humane farming and homesteading may sound good, but per Peaceful Prairie and other respected Sanctuaries, the reality is that such places are “death camps for the animals who are bought, sold, kept, bred, used, and violently killed there” (peacefulprairie.org).  The Humane Society of the United States discusses Biblical views on the treatment of animals (which are quite similar across the major world religions) in their booklet, The Bible’s Teachings on Protecting Animals and Nature:                                                           

        Into Your Hand Are They Delivered               “The Bible contains numerous strictures against wanton or cruel killing of wildlife and domestic animals. Ecclesiastes (3:19-21) asserts that humans are vain to believe that their destinies differ from those of animals: “For the fate of the sons of men and the fate of beasts is the same; as one dies, so dies the other. They all have the same breath, and man has no advantage over the beasts; for all is vanity. All go to one place; all are from dust, and all turn to dust again. Who knows whether the spirit of man goes upward and the spirit of the beast goes down to the earth?”             
     In numerous places in the Bible, God acts toward humans and animals in an equitable way. When God saved Noah and his family from destruction, God treated the animals in a similar manner: “And God remembered Noah and every living thing, and all the cattle that were with him in the ark” (Genesis 8:1).  Further, in Isaiah 66:2-3, God compared the killing of an animal with the murder of a human: “He who slaughters an ox is like him who kills a man ...”
     Interestingly, the New Testament never depicts Jesus eating meat in his lifetime, not even at the Last Supper, although on two occasions after his death and resurrection the Bible describes his eating fish.
     Many Christians see deep significance in the story of Jesus beginning his life among the animals (Luke 2:7). Denied shelter and lodging by the humans of Bethlehem in Judea, Mary and Joseph were forced to use a manger
for Jesus’ birthplace. There, Jesus was born, presumably in the company of such creatures as donkeys, oxen, cows, and sheep.“
     Simeon Fuchs states that he has given Sally several chances over the years to (as he terms it) “get with the program,” and while her lack of adjustment to the Homestead has not served the goals there, it now appears that this unfortunate cow is being punished for not conforming to expectations.  I asked Swedish Homestead if they have considered a Rescue for Sally; Simeon did respond the same day, though essentially repeated what he’s said in the videos about Sally being given many chances, not being able to produce a calf, and that she will be “processed” on April 11. I was able to connect with cow protection and animal welfare organizations in the United States and a possible Sanctuary placement for Sally in Sweden; to date, Simeon has responded only that Sally has had a good life, that this is what happens on working farms, and asked that his stewardship of the farm be respected. I agree with the latter statement, though am distressed by this decision and would very much like to see this cow have a chance in an environment that supports her to live a peaceful life.
     Please ask Swedish Homestead to cancel “processing” of Sally and to instead release
her to a Sanctuary, where she can receive the care and understanding that she deserves.



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