Petition Closed

On April 12, CCFC filed a Federal Trade Commission complaint against Your Baby Can Read! for false and deceptive marketing.  The $200 video series encourages parents to put infants as young as three months in front of screens. Yet according to literacy experts who have examined Your Baby Can Read!, the program does not teach actual reading; at best, it’s memorization. Nor is there evidence that babies who watch the videos are better readers later on.

In addition to conning parents out of $200, Your Baby Can Read! may be putting babies at risk.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no screen time for children under age two.  Research links infant screen time to sleep disturbances and delayed language acquisition, as well as problems in later childhood such as poor school performance and childhood obesity. 

Please urge the FTC to stop Your Baby Can Read from deceiving parents by signing the petition below.  If you've purchased
YBCR, please be sure to indicate that in the comment box.

Letter to
Federal Trade Commission Chairman Leibowitz
I urge you to act on the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood’s April 12, 2011 complaint against Your Baby Can Read. These videos are deceptively marketed as educational for infants. Your Baby Can Read, advertised extensively on the web and television, exploits parents’ natural inclinations to provide children with every possible advantage.

According to literacy experts who have examined Your Baby Can Read!, the program does not teach actual reading; at best, it’s memorization. Even though babies and toddlers may recognize written words, their brains aren’t developed enough to actually learn to read. Nor is there evidence that babies who watch the videos are better readers later on.

In fact, there is no evidence babies learn anything—let alone how to read—by watching videos. And research links infant screen time to sleep disturbances and delayed language acquisition, as well as problems in later childhood such as poor school performance and childhood obesity. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no screen time for children under two.

Parents deserve honest information. I hope you will prevent Your Baby Can Read from undermining parents’ efforts to raise healthy children and ensure that those parents who have already been deceived will be duly compensated.

Sincerely,