Enforce puppy mill law

230K supporters


Petition update

Need your help - Make a Statement on Social Media

Kim Baxter
Lenoir, NC, United States

Jun 23, 2015 — We need your help to make our cause go viral

Thanks again for all your help to date.


To get the maximum impact, we need everyone to click on this link, http://thndr.it/1GxoCF9 We need your help to make our cause go viral

Thanks again for all your help to date.

We have started a Thunderclap to get our cause even more visibility. This service will put a message on your FB and/or Twitter feed on July 9th. The message is “Took 223K Petition Signatures 2 Albany but NY PuppyMill remains open. Tell NY State to shut it down NOW”

To get the maximum impact, we need everyone to click on this link, http://thndr.it/1GxoCF9 and then click on support using your Twitter, FB or Tumbler account (or all three). After you click on support, we also need you to share the Thunderclap link.

Update on Albany trip. We have been in communication with the Ags and Market Division. We got some answers to our original questions but did not feel they were complete. We have sent them additional evidence supporting our concerns and are waiting for their response.

Finally, I would like to share another letter one of the 101 parents wrote to Governor Cuomo. I hope it touches your heart like it did mine

F10 arrived here at 9:30pm, Tuesday, December 17, 2013. Jodi Lasky called around 6:30pm to say she had run into horrible traffic going through Phillie and had just gotten my foster. She figured it would be about 3 hours and would it be okay to drop her off. “Sure. Whenever you get here is fine.” She told me that the foster had already been spayed and she had a vaccination record to give me.
When the doorbell rang, Jodi was at the door and asked if we were ready for her. I don’t know if you can ever be ready for what the world is capable of doing but you take the good and the bad and just keep going. Hearing through Facebook that the other dog being transported was wounded, I had warmed a beach towel in the dryer and fixed an old Keeshond coat building recipe for Jodi to take with her. I gave her that bag and went with her to find my foster huddling in her crate. She was so tiny and scared. The puppy beside her was pawing her through the gaps but she turned away. Jodi tried to get her out of the crate but F10 kept catching her paws on her crate bracing herself. Finally, Jodi and I lifted the crate out of her vehicle and placed it on the concrete sidewalk so I could pull her out slowly, encouraging her to let go. We both kept telling her it was going to be okay and she was in a better place.

After letting her walk a bit around the front yard, I picked her up, told Jodi I had her and to have safe travels to the next foster, then walked in the house and had my mother hold her while I checked F10 over before I took her for a Dawn bath. She was a mess with huge mats of nastiness hanging from her ears, legs, and butt. She was stinky. She was terrified of what we were going to do and very sad.

I grew-up with Keeshonden. When I was born, my parents had five Keeshonden and were breeding, showing, and training. Two of them taught me how to walk. I didn’t hold hands to help keep my balance. I held the fur along the backs of two Keeshonden who would patiently walk small steps at a time, go through doorways one at a time so we could all make it through, and would lick my face until I laughed, let go of their fur, and sat down. I was a member of their pack and I learned a lot about their language and rules.
Rule Number 1: pack first. You protect and care for your pack. When one of the pack does not feel well or is sad, the pack offers comfort and protection. Snuggles and licks are top of the list.
Rule Number 2: the bitch is in charge. You may have a male with three females and think that the male is in charge. HA! One of those females is in charge and it is probably the one that looks the most relaxed and barks the least. She has no reason to bark because the others do it for her, and she is relaxed because they will do whatever is needed to make sure she is happy. If the bitch in charge is not happy, ain’t nobody in the pack happy.
Rule Number 3: don’t muss the fur. You want to tick-off or annoy a Kee, muss the fur one too many times and not be a person or Kee that they love.

F10 knew very few of these rules. F10 knew pack order and survival. Rather than coming towards us for comfort, she ran towards my other Keeshonden who were very confused about her. I could tell from the cock of their heads, positions of their ears, and concern in their eyes that they did not know what she was or why she was acting like she was. I am their Mama and they did not know why F10 was running from their Mama who fed them, cuddled with them, cleaned them, and made sure when they weren’t feeling well that they were taken to the vet and given what was needed. Why did she pee all over the floor when Mama just went to pet her and talked to her softly? They stayed far away from F10 I would guess because of how she smelled and also because of how she was acting. I talked to them to let them know that F10 was just scared and hurt but it would be okay because she was with us now.
My mother held F10 while I cut the worst of the matts out of her fur. There is no way she could be comfortable with feces and urine matted so closely to her legs, anus, and behind her ears. I could not even get the scissors under some places because it was all so close to her skin. I got the worst of what I could see for a first go over and took her upstairs to the bathroom to give her a gentle Dawn bath.
I talked to her the whole time about how we were going to take care of her. That she was in a safe place now. That we would love her no matter what and she deserved so much better. Inside, I was outraged. After all my years with Keeshonden to have one arrive at my home in such a condition from someone who calls themselves a Keeshonden breeder is a farce. F10 showed no signs of human socialization which all Keeshonden crave. I could feel her ribs under her heavy coat and there was no give to her stiff body as I carried her. She felt like she was waiting for me to hurt her or be cruel. Keeshonden curl into you for comfort, not try to pull away. They gather around your feet and become a part of your world not wait for your feet to kick them. Everything I experienced in that first hour with her told me what hell her life had been because everything that she should have been, she wasn’t except for the packaging. Her packaging was a Keeshond. And that’s what confused my other Keeshonden. She looked like one although half their size but she didn’t act or smell like any that they knew. After the Dawn bath, getting dried, and then another clipping with the scissors to remove more of the feces and urine matted fur, I saw the first glimpse in her eyes of a Keeshond. That small light in her eyes that Keeshond all possess and which every vet has always commented as the “hope” look. You can be the worst human being in the world and a Keeshond will still come to you with a look of “hope” that maybe this time you’ll do the right thing and be the wonderful person that they know you are deep inside. That look told me that somewhere underneath the fear and filth was the Keeshond she was always meant to be.

That first night, I slept on the couch and my mother slept in her chair so that we could be on the same floor as F10. She spent most of the night trying to climb the babygates either to get to my other Keeshonden or to get out of the bathroom where she was temporarily. My mother and I joked that she must have thought her name was, “No, off,” by the end of the night. It was an exhausting night but she could not be with my Keeshonden until I had her checked-out by my vet (and my Keeshonden were very ready to meet her by the morning). I let my other Keeshonden (Cece, Bas, and Lily) outside for their morning run and they immediately were back at the door wanting to be introduced to the new addition. But what to call her? There was no way she was being called F10 to them. Just thinking F10 was disgusting to me. I tried calling her Willow but the look from Bas said, “Does she look like a Willow to you?” He was right and I kept searching and thinking. Finally, I found Audra which is a nickname for the Saint Audrey and was known for strength of will. When I called “Audra,” she looked at me from exploring the couch and I knew that was to be her name. My mother held her while I let the others out of their room and introduced them to Audra because they had waited all night to meet her and I hoped it would relax Audra before our trip to the vet.

At Belair Veterinary Hospital in Bowie, MD, Dr. Theresa Roller examined Audra. She did a thorough examination understanding that I knew little about Audra’s background and the more information that she could give me, the more that I could help Audra. Dr. Roller and I talked about the impact of the luxating patellas on Audra’s movements and when I should become concerned. We talked about the vaccination schedule to bring her up-to-date because even though I had some information neither of us believed we could trust all of it and her system had just been inundated within the last 24 hours between the vaccines she was given and the spay procedure. We also talked about that fact that though Dr. Roller just upon visual examination would have thought Audra was okay once she put her hands on Audra, she could quickly tell things were not well. Keeshonden hide things with their cute expressions and fluffy coats. When trying to handle her, Audra’s nose would go straight to the ceiling indicating she was extremely stressed and apprehensive. From afar though, she just looked leery. When she put her hands on Audra, she could feel Audra’s ribs and the luxating patellas. Cute and fluffy meet starving and medically unsound all at one time.

After we left the vet, the next challenge was how to get her to eat. Audra had no idea how to eat or drink from a bowl. When food was placed in a bowl (chicken and rice), she nosed all of the food out of the bowl and then would eat it off of the floor. She also would not eat with the other Keeshonden and would let them take whatever food was there rather than nose in for her own portion. I open feed which means food and water is always available to them in their bowls. Unless I separated her to a “safe” place for the first 2 months and fed her a progress blend of the chicken and rice plus the food the others ate, she would completely ignore the other food. When she progressed to eating and drinking from the bowls, I placed them in the bowl holder. When her collar got caught on the bowl holder and caused all the bowls to flip over in her panic to get loose, the process had to start all over again for another month before she was willing to try to eat from the bowls in the bowl holder. It took 5 months before she realized she could eat whatever she wanted whenever she wanted and that the bowls would get refilled. She did not have to wait for the others in the pack to eat and then get whatever was leftover.
Since she had never worn a collar or leash, she had to wear one all day, every day when she came to me. Her leash was nylon so it could drag around behind her and I could switch it with another nylon leash while the other was being cleaned. If she had not had the collar and leash on her, there was no way to catch her either to take her outside or to bring her inside. About a month after she joined us, I took a chance and let her off her leash to go outside. We have an enclosed, fenced yard so it was a safe area to monitor her reaction and progress. I had to trap her with an extra piece of picket railing, a fence, and the side of a shed in order to catch her to come back in even though the rest of the pack had long gone inside. I learned two things that day: 1) she was not ready to be off leash even in the enclosed backyard and 2) use the others to convince her that she was safe. It was another month before we tried the trust approach again and even then I used one of the other pack and turned my back on her before she came behind me and allowed me to reattach her leash.

Audra could not start formal basic training until May 2014. The first time I took her to our training facility was a Tuesday night in February 2014. It was a brief outing with just her and me so that she could understand that we would go somewhere different from the house or a vet, she would see other dogs that were well treated and going through training, and then we would come home to her pack. She made it 5 minutes at the facility before we had to leave. She skittered about having no idea where was safe to walk as we came inside. She shook so hard that her ears were trembling the whole time we were inside the training area. And the look at seeing all of these different dogs spoke volumes to her lack of exposure to any other breeds. Patience and short, increasing interval visits reduced her reaction and eventually she came to nose the other dogs in greeting and allow people to pet her as long as the other dogs were there. It was not until June 2014 when Audra approached the first person at the facility on her own without needing another dog there as moral support. The whole process had to be extremely slow and with people who understood dog behavior so that she had only positive experiences when people touched her because a negative experience would set us back months of progress. The Tuesday night class became her support group and each step was met with “Way to go, Audra” and positive praises from those she had come to trust. In July 2014, Audra graduated from Basic Obedience with the highest score in her class. Way to go, Audra!

In October 2014, our training group hosted a Canine Good Citizen test. This test is really about the socialization aspects of dog training such as allowing strangers to pet or brush, walk through a crowd with noisy strollers and toys, and basic obedience such as come, sit, down, and stay. Walking through the crowd was not a problem and Audra allowed the examiner to pet and brush her. Sit and stay were no problem but I was praying for the down. I knew that coming from the crowded kennel with all of the neglect and abuse made her not trust “down”. “Down” is dangerous. “Down” does not let you get away fast enough from another dog that wants the food you have. “Down” makes you the bottom of the pile and you feel crushed under the weight of the other dogs. “Down” is not good; “down” is bad. So when the “down” moment came, I was praying that Audra would realize that she was safe and “down” was good. It took 3 times of repeating the command and a gentle pull on her front paws to get her started but she did “down”. She did “down”!! She did it during Basic Obedience but here with strangers and strange dogs, she did “down”!! The examiner realized what a huge thing this must have been from my expression and said, “That’s all she needed to do for that. She can do the come and stay from whatever position she is most comfortable.” Audra passed and she was so proud of herself that you could see it in her eyes. Almost 10 months of patience, consistency, slow progress, and determination had finally gotten her to the point where I could say that the scared Keeshond that had arrived that late night in December 2013 was finally starting to be the Keeshond she was always meant to be.

Audra still has her moments where the world overwhelms her. She suffers from crate anxiety so she travels in my truck using a harness and never has to worry about being locked up in something that causes her flashbacks. She will bay at my mother late at night when my mother is walking passed the dog room using her cane even though she can see my mother through the babygate (they used a dog catch pole to catch the dogs so the sound must remind her and causes her to panic). Sudden sounds whether loud or soft can cause her to slam against the back of my legs in fear until I place a hand on her and let her know it is okay that I will never let those things hurt her. When strangers come to visit and see her, they have to just enjoy the view. Unless she senses some special connections with the other Keeshonden in the pack, she will stay in her “safe” place where they can see and talk to her but as soon as they reach for her, she will move back rather than forward like the others do.
We decided to adopt Audra in February 2014. Audra had been through enough changes and challenges in her short life. She needed us and her adopted pack. The last thing that I do for Audra and my other Keeshonden both past and present is to advocate for the closing of the puppy mill that resulted in Audra. No dog should ever have to spend nights outside in weather below freezing without adequate shelter, food, and water. No Keeshonden should ever be cut-off from the human companionship that is bred into them to crave for over 200 years of breeding history. No breed that was once revered enough for their devotion and intelligence to be the symbol of a revolutionary party should be reduced to cowering behind a chair because a puppy mill breeder has been allowed to continue her neglectful and abusive practices despite there being laws that would allow her to be shut down.

My Keeshonden have no voice but I do: SHUT MARJORIE INGRAHAM’S KENNEL DOWN! Use the laws and the law enforcement provisions given to end the nightmare than Audra’s brethren are still living.

and then click on support using your Twitter, FB or Tumbler account (or all three). After you click on support, we also need you to share the Thunderclap link.

Update on Albany Visit - We have heard back from the Ags and Market division and have sent them additional evidence of the concerns we have with Marjorie's Kennel and her non compliance with New York laws.

Finally, I would like to share another letter one of the 101 parents wrote to Governor Cuomo. I hope it touches your heart like it did mine

F10 arrived here at 9:30pm, Tuesday, December 17, 2013. Jodi Lasky called around 6:30pm to say she had run into horrible traffic going through Phillie and had just gotten my foster. She figured it would be about 3 hours and would it be okay to drop her off. “Sure. Whenever you get here is fine.” She told me that the foster had already been spayed and she had a vaccination record to give me.

When the doorbell rang, Jodi was at the door and asked if we were ready for her. I don’t know if you can ever be ready for what the world is capable of doing but you take the good and the bad and just keep going. Hearing through Facebook that the other dog being transported was wounded, I had warmed a beach towel in the dryer and fixed an old Keeshond coat building recipe for Jodi to take with her. I gave her that bag and went with her to find my foster huddling in her crate. She was so tiny and scared. The puppy beside her was pawing her through the gaps but she turned away. Jodi tried to get her out of the crate but F10 kept catching her paws on her crate bracing herself. Finally, Jodi and I lifted the crate out of her vehicle and placed it on the concrete sidewalk so I could pull her out slowly, encouraging her to let go. We both kept telling her it was going to be okay and she was in a better place.

After letting her walk a bit around the front yard, I picked her up, told Jodi I had her and to have safe travels to the next foster, then walked in the house and had my mother hold her while I checked F10 over before I took her for a Dawn bath. She was a mess with huge mats of nastiness hanging from her ears, legs, and butt. She was stinky. She was terrified of what we were going to do and very sad.

I grew-up with Keeshonden. When I was born, my parents had five Keeshonden and were breeding, showing, and training. Two of them taught me how to walk. I didn’t hold hands to help keep my balance. I held the fur along the backs of two Keeshonden who would patiently walk small steps at a time, go through doorways one at a time so we could all make it through, and would lick my face until I laughed, let go of their fur, and sat down. I was a member of their pack and I learned a lot about their language and rules.
Rule Number 1: pack first. You protect and care for your pack. When one of the pack does not feel well or is sad, the pack offers comfort and protection. Snuggles and licks are top of the list.
Rule Number 2: the bitch is in charge. You may have a male with three females and think that the male is in charge. HA! One of those females is in charge and it is probably the one that looks the most relaxed and barks the least. She has no reason to bark because the others do it for her, and she is relaxed because they will do whatever is needed to make sure she is happy. If the bitch in charge is not happy, ain’t nobody in the pack happy.
Rule Number 3: don’t muss the fur. You want to tick-off or annoy a Kee, muss the fur one too many times and not be a person or Kee that they love.

F10 knew very few of these rules. F10 knew pack order and survival. Rather than coming towards us for comfort, she ran towards my other Keeshonden who were very confused about her. I could tell from the cock of their heads, positions of their ears, and concern in their eyes that they did not know what she was or why she was acting like she was. I am their Mama and they did not know why F10 was running from their Mama who fed them, cuddled with them, cleaned them, and made sure when they weren’t feeling well that they were taken to the vet and given what was needed. Why did she pee all over the floor when Mama just went to pet her and talked to her softly? They stayed far away from F10 I would guess because of how she smelled and also because of how she was acting. I talked to them to let them know that F10 was just scared and hurt but it would be okay because she was with us now.

My mother held F10 while I cut the worst of the matts out of her fur. There is no way she could be comfortable with feces and urine matted so closely to her legs, anus, and behind her ears. I could not even get the scissors under some places because it was all so close to her skin. I got the worst of what I could see for a first go over and took her upstairs to the bathroom to give her a gentle Dawn bath.

I talked to her the whole time about how we were going to take care of her. That she was in a safe place now. That we would love her no matter what and she deserved so much better. Inside, I was outraged. After all my years with Keeshonden to have one arrive at my home in such a condition from someone who calls themselves a Keeshonden breeder is a farce. F10 showed no signs of human socialization which all Keeshonden crave. I could feel her ribs under her heavy coat and there was no give to her stiff body as I carried her. She felt like she was waiting for me to hurt her or be cruel. Keeshonden curl into you for comfort, not try to pull away. They gather around your feet and become a part of your world not wait for your feet to kick them. Everything I experienced in that first hour with her told me what hell her life had been because everything that she should have been, she wasn’t except for the packaging. Her packaging was a Keeshond. And that’s what confused my other Keeshonden. She looked like one although half their size but she didn’t act or smell like any that they knew. After the Dawn bath, getting dried, and then another clipping with the scissors to remove more of the feces and urine matted fur, I saw the first glimpse in her eyes of a Keeshond. That small light in her eyes that Keeshond all possess and which every vet has always commented as the “hope” look. You can be the worst human being in the world and a Keeshond will still come to you with a look of “hope” that maybe this time you’ll do the right thing and be the wonderful person that they know you are deep inside. That look told me that somewhere underneath the fear and filth was the Keeshond she was always meant to be.

That first night, I slept on the couch and my mother slept in her chair so that we could be on the same floor as F10. She spent most of the night trying to climb the babygates either to get to my other Keeshonden or to get out of the bathroom where she was temporarily. My mother and I joked that she must have thought her name was, “No, off,” by the end of the night. It was an exhausting night but she could not be with my Keeshonden until I had her checked-out by my vet (and my Keeshonden were very ready to meet her by the morning). I let my other Keeshonden (Cece, Bas, and Lily) outside for their morning run and they immediately were back at the door wanting to be introduced to the new addition. But what to call her? There was no way she was being called F10 to them. Just thinking F10 was disgusting to me. I tried calling her Willow but the look from Bas said, “Does she look like a Willow to you?” He was right and I kept searching and thinking. Finally, I found Audra which is a nickname for the Saint Audrey and was known for strength of will. When I called “Audra,” she looked at me from exploring the couch and I knew that was to be her name. My mother held her while I let the others out of their room and introduced them to Audra because they had waited all night to meet her and I hoped it would relax Audra before our trip to the vet.

At Belair Veterinary Hospital in Bowie, MD, Dr. Theresa Roller examined Audra. She did a thorough examination understanding that I knew little about Audra’s background and the more information that she could give me, the more that I could help Audra. Dr. Roller and I talked about the impact of the luxating patellas on Audra’s movements and when I should become concerned. We talked about the vaccination schedule to bring her up-to-date because even though I had some information neither of us believed we could trust all of it and her system had just been inundated within the last 24 hours between the vaccines she was given and the spay procedure. We also talked about that fact that though Dr. Roller just upon visual examination would have thought Audra was okay once she put her hands on Audra, she could quickly tell things were not well. Keeshonden hide things with their cute expressions and fluffy coats. When trying to handle her, Audra’s nose would go straight to the ceiling indicating she was extremely stressed and apprehensive. From afar though, she just looked leery. When she put her hands on Audra, she could feel Audra’s ribs and the luxating patellas. Cute and fluffy meet starving and medically unsound all at one time.

After we left the vet, the next challenge was how to get her to eat. Audra had no idea how to eat or drink from a bowl. When food was placed in a bowl (chicken and rice), she nosed all of the food out of the bowl and then would eat it off of the floor. She also would not eat with the other Keeshonden and would let them take whatever food was there rather than nose in for her own portion. I open feed which means food and water is always available to them in their bowls. Unless I separated her to a “safe” place for the first 2 months and fed her a progress blend of the chicken and rice plus the food the others ate, she would completely ignore the other food. When she progressed to eating and drinking from the bowls, I placed them in the bowl holder. When her collar got caught on the bowl holder and caused all the bowls to flip over in her panic to get loose, the process had to start all over again for another month before she was willing to try to eat from the bowls in the bowl holder. It took 5 months before she realized she could eat whatever she wanted whenever she wanted and that the bowls would get refilled. She did not have to wait for the others in the pack to eat and then get whatever was leftover.
Since she had never worn a collar or leash, she had to wear one all day, every day when she came to me. Her leash was nylon so it could drag around behind her and I could switch it with another nylon leash while the other was being cleaned. If she had not had the collar and leash on her, there was no way to catch her either to take her outside or to bring her inside. About a month after she joined us, I took a chance and let her off her leash to go outside. We have an enclosed, fenced yard so it was a safe area to monitor her reaction and progress. I had to trap her with an extra piece of picket railing, a fence, and the side of a shed in order to catch her to come back in even though the rest of the pack had long gone inside. I learned two things that day: 1) she was not ready to be off leash even in the enclosed backyard and 2) use the others to convince her that she was safe. It was another month before we tried the trust approach again and even then I used one of the other pack and turned my back on her before she came behind me and allowed me to reattach her leash.

Audra could not start formal basic training until May 2014. The first time I took her to our training facility was a Tuesday night in February 2014. It was a brief outing with just her and me so that she could understand that we would go somewhere different from the house or a vet, she would see other dogs that were well treated and going through training, and then we would come home to her pack. She made it 5 minutes at the facility before we had to leave. She skittered about having no idea where was safe to walk as we came inside. She shook so hard that her ears were trembling the whole time we were inside the training area. And the look at seeing all of these different dogs spoke volumes to her lack of exposure to any other breeds. Patience and short, increasing interval visits reduced her reaction and eventually she came to nose the other dogs in greeting and allow people to pet her as long as the other dogs were there. It was not until June 2014 when Audra approached the first person at the facility on her own without needing another dog there as moral support. The whole process had to be extremely slow and with people who understood dog behavior so that she had only positive experiences when people touched her because a negative experience would set us back months of progress. The Tuesday night class became her support group and each step was met with “Way to go, Audra” and positive praises from those she had come to trust. In July 2014, Audra graduated from Basic Obedience with the highest score in her class. Way to go, Audra!

In October 2014, our training group hosted a Canine Good Citizen test. This test is really about the socialization aspects of dog training such as allowing strangers to pet or brush, walk through a crowd with noisy strollers and toys, and basic obedience such as come, sit, down, and stay. Walking through the crowd was not a problem and Audra allowed the examiner to pet and brush her. Sit and stay were no problem but I was praying for the down. I knew that coming from the crowded kennel with all of the neglect and abuse made her not trust “down”. “Down” is dangerous. “Down” does not let you get away fast enough from another dog that wants the food you have. “Down” makes you the bottom of the pile and you feel crushed under the weight of the other dogs. “Down” is not good; “down” is bad. So when the “down” moment came, I was praying that Audra would realize that she was safe and “down” was good. It took 3 times of repeating the command and a gentle pull on her front paws to get her started but she did “down”. She did “down”!! She did it during Basic Obedience but here with strangers and strange dogs, she did “down”!! The examiner realized what a huge thing this must have been from my expression and said, “That’s all she needed to do for that. She can do the come and stay from whatever position she is most comfortable.” Audra passed and she was so proud of herself that you could see it in her eyes. Almost 10 months of patience, consistency, slow progress, and determination had finally gotten her to the point where I could say that the scared Keeshond that had arrived that late night in December 2013 was finally starting to be the Keeshond she was always meant to be.

Audra still has her moments where the world overwhelms her. She suffers from crate anxiety so she travels in my truck using a harness and never has to worry about being locked up in something that causes her flashbacks. She will bay at my mother late at night when my mother is walking passed the dog room using her cane even though she can see my mother through the babygate (they used a dog catch pole to catch the dogs so the sound must remind her and causes her to panic). Sudden sounds whether loud or soft can cause her to slam against the back of my legs in fear until I place a hand on her and let her know it is okay that I will never let those things hurt her. When strangers come to visit and see her, they have to just enjoy the view. Unless she senses some special connections with the other Keeshonden in the pack, she will stay in her “safe” place where they can see and talk to her but as soon as they reach for her, she will move back rather than forward like the others do.
We decided to adopt Audra in February 2014. Audra had been through enough changes and challenges in her short life. She needed us and her adopted pack. The last thing that I do for Audra and my other Keeshonden both past and present is to advocate for the closing of the puppy mill that resulted in Audra. No dog should ever have to spend nights outside in weather below freezing without adequate shelter, food, and water. No Keeshonden should ever be cut-off from the human companionship that is bred into them to crave for over 200 years of breeding history. No breed that was once revered enough for their devotion and intelligence to be the symbol of a revolutionary party should be reduced to cowering behind a chair because a puppy mill breeder has been allowed to continue her neglectful and abusive practices despite there being laws that would allow her to be shut down.

My Keeshonden have no voice but I do: SHUT MARJORIE INGRAHAM’S KENNEL DOWN! Use the laws and the law enforcement provisions given to end the nightmare than Audra’s brethren are still living.


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