Make Freo Natural Bush-land Areas Cat Free! Save Fremantle's wildlife via Cat Act!

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Please help us save our wildlife!

With the State Government calling for feedback on the Cat Act, we as residents or visitors to Fremantle would like to see tighter control of cats in our neighborhoods and parks due to the impact they pose on our native wildlife and biodiversity. Ideally we would like to see cats confined to their homes 24 hours per day across the City of Fremantle.

Currently cats have free range of our entire city, they can access all natural bush-land areas with no consequence for their owners (where dog owners would be fined). We as residents or visitors to Fremantle would like to see tighter control of cats in our neighborhoods and parks due to the impact they pose on our native wildlife and biodiversity. Ideally we would like to see cats restricted from our natural bush-land areas; Booyeembara Park, Samson Park, Clontarf Hill, Cantonment Hill and Hollis Park. 

Why?

Because cost of our feline friends roaming free is too great to them as well as our native wildlife.

Did you know that…?

1.       Cats kill more than 1 million birds in Australia every day. That is 377 million birds a year.

2.       Cats kill without lifting a paw via spread of toxoplasmosis, your healthy appearing cat might be spreading this highly infectious disease. Toxoplasmosis is spread in the urine and faeces of cats. All mammals, including humans, are susceptible and it is lethal to our native marsupials.

3.       South Fremantle lays at the beginning of wildlife corridor that goes all the way to Bibra Lake. It is a refuge and home to many species of Honeyeaters, majestic Black Cockatoo, friendly Bobtail lizards, shy Bandicoots, and stunning wildflowers. The corridor is nestled within the urban environment alongside homes and existing roads and cats pose an enormous threat to the wildlife living in it.

4.       Nearly 40% of bobtail lizards admitted to wildlife rehabilitation centres in Perth have signs of the Nidovirus also known as ‘bobtail flu’. Fremantle is lucky to house a population of those garden friendly lizards however their numbers are on heavy decline. Lizards infected with nidovirus are very weak and lethargic making them an easy pray for cats.

5.       FIV & FeLV viruses causing Feline AIDS and Feline Leukeamia are estimated to infect between 14-29% of the Australian cat population, with the highest rate of infections occurring in Western Australia. Cats spread this disease via saliva exchange whilst fighting with each other. Cats are territorial and they do fight, a lot. You can keep your beloved pet injury and disease free by keeping it indoors.

Please help us save our wildlife and improve welfare of cats!

Sign if you agree!