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End the Faroe Islands Dolphin and Whale Killing Festival

This petition had 1,614 supporters


The Atlantic White Sided Dolphin is fairly small, it grows to 9ft (3 meters) in length and it can weigh 400 to 500 lb. Even though the Atlantic White Sided Dolphin has a Conservation Status of Low-Risk Least Concern it doesn’t mean we, as global citizens shouldn’t protect them.

Commercial Fishing has become a problem to the Atlantic White Sided Dolphin.  The fishing gear has become another predator to the dolphin. The fishing nets cause the dolphins to get entangled and die because they become by catch. And if the incidental catch was not enough as a threat to the dolphin it is also target for direct catch.

The Faeroe Islands host a festival where they kill Pilot Whales and the Atlantic White Sided Whale. This festival is considered to be a tradition but not every tradition should be passed on to the next generations. 430 Atlantic White Sided Dolphins were killed in 2013 in the festival. The method used to kill the Atlantic White Sided Dolphin is very painful and inhumane. If the leading these delicate hearing animals to the shore with loud motorboats is not painful enough, the people drag the defenseless dolphins to shore with a hook being inserted in their blow whole. Once at shore the dolphins have their necks sliced and are left to bleed to death.

The traditional Faeroe Islands Dolphin and Whale Killing festival needs to come to an end. We have lost enough animals because we wait until the very last moment to try and save a species. Let’s begin to do things differently and start early before it is to late for the Atlantic White Sided Whale. It is important to try and conserve the amazing species we have left in our planet for our future generations and so we won’t be responsible for the loss of another innocent species.  



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Maria Alvarez needs your help with “Faroese Government: End the Faeroe Islands Dolphin and Whale Killing Festival”. Join Maria and 1,613 supporters today.