Keep the Gifted Allotment in Place in House Bill 3

Keep the Gifted Allotment in Place in House Bill 3

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Sabrina James started this petition to State Representative Dan Huberty

State Representative Dan Huberty and members of the House Public Education Committee,

Texas Education Code Section 42.156 provides for a G/T weight (allotment) for school districts. TEC Section 42.156 states, “For each identified student a school district serves in a program for gifted and talented students that the district certifies to the commissioner as complying with Subchapter D, Chapter 29, a district is entitled to an annual allotment equal to the district’s adjusted basic allotment as determined under Section 42.102 or Section 42.103, as applicable, multiplied by .12 for each school year or a greater amount provided by appropriation.” Facts about Section 42.156 (G/T Allotment): • The G/T weight is 0.12 • The G/T allotment is worth $165 million • more than 5% of a district’s students in average daily attendance are eligible for funding under this section.--TEC 42.156(c) 

House Bill 3 (HB3) is a bill in the Texas House of Representatives relating to public school finance and public education. HB3 was introduced by Rep. Huberty, chair of the House Public Education Committee on March 5, 2019. Sections in HB3 that pertain to G/T education: 


• “Each school district shall annually certify to the commissioner that the district has established a program for gifted and talented students under this subchapter.” (HB3 Section 29.124). This section further lays out penalties for districts that do not certify programs for G/T students. 
• HB3 Article 3, Section 3.001 outlines a list of items to repeal, which includes the G/T allotment (TEC Section 42.156), among other allotment.  

A repeal of the G/T allotment will de-emphasize the importance of gifted education in Texas affecting more than 400,000 students. Districts will have no requirement on specific funds allotted to gifted education. Other states have made similar funding changes in the past for gifted education programs, with unexpected consequences. For example, in 2009, the state of Ohio chose to move their G/T funds to its general education funds. As a result, complaints of inequities in G/T services increased to such extent over the next 9 years that in 2018, the Ohio General Assembly mandated the Ohio Education Agency to conduct a research study on the costs of G/T programming within the state.  Allowing all funding to go through general funding will not assure that gifted education WILL gets its proper funding!! Although HB3 has required districts to provide a gifted program, it has not defined parameters of what is required, nor has it defined how it will be certified. Without required parameters, districts can implement a skeleton program that will not meet the specific needs and requirements for this group of students. All students in Texas deserve a challenging and appropriate education. Please maintain this funding to keep these vital programs in place.
 
 
 
 

 

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