Petition Closed

This internationally recognized petition is addressed to John Scalon and all members of CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) listed below:

Afghanistan

Albania

Algeria

Angola

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Armenia

Australia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Belarus

Belgium

Belize

Benin

Bhutan

Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Botswana

Brazil

Brunei Darussalam

Bulgaria

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cambodia

Cameroon

Canada

Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad

Chile

China

Colombia

Comoros

Congo

Costa Rica

Côte d'Ivoire

Croatia

Cuba

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Denmark

Djibouti

Dominica

Dominican Republic

Ecuador

Egypt

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Estonia

Ethiopia

Fiji

Finland

France

Gabon

Gambia

Georgia

Germany

Ghana

Greece

Grenada

Guatemala

Guinea

Guinea-Bissau

Guyana

Honduras

Hungary

Iceland

India

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Jamaica

Japan

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kuwait

Kyrgyzstan

Lao People's Democratic Republic

Latvia

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Maldives

Mali

Maldives

Malta

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mexico

Monaco

Mongolia

Montenegro

Morocco

Mozambique

Myanmar

Namibia

Nepal

Netherlands

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

Nigeria

Norway

Oman

Pakistan

Palau

Panama

Papua New Guinea

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Qatar

Republic of Korea

Republic of Moldova

Romania

Russian Federation

Rwanda

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Samoa

San Marino

Sao Tome and Principe

Saudi Arabia

Senegal

Serbia

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Slovakia

Slovenia

Solomon Islands

Somalia

South Africa

Spain

Sri Lanka

Sudan

Suriname

Swaziland

Sweden

Switzerland

Syrian Arab Republic

Thailand

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Togo

Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia

Turkey

Uganda

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

United Republic of Tanzania

United States of America

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanuatu

Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)

Viet Nam

Yemen

Zambia

Zimbabwe

 

**While certain species of cetaceans are registered in Appendix I, we feel that it is important that ALL cetaceans be registered in either Appendix I or, at the very least, Appendix II.

 

Below are the cetacean species currently falling under Appendix I (note: these are the only ceteceans under protection - all other species, at present, have no protection what-so-ever):

CETACEA Dolphins, porpoises, whales

CETACEA spp. (Except the species included in Appendix I. A zero annual export quota has been established for live specimens from the Black Sea population of Tursiops truncatus removed from the wild and traded for primarily commercial purposes)

 Balaenidae Bowhead whale, right whales

Balaena mysticetus

Eubalaena spp.

Balaenopteridae Humpback whale, rorquals

Balaenoptera acutorostrata (Except the population of West Greenland, which is included in Appendix II)

Balaenoptera bonaerensis

Balaenoptera borealis

Balaenoptera edeni

Balaenoptera musculus

Balaenoptera omurai

Balaenoptera physalus

Megaptera novaeangliae

Delphinidae Dolphins

Orcaella brevirostris

Orcaella heinsohni

Sotalia spp.

Sousa spp.

Eschrichtiidae Grey whale

Eschrichtius robustus

Iniidae River dolphins

Lipotes vexillifer

Neobalaenidae Pygmy right whale

Caperea marginata

Phocoenidae Porpoises

Neophocaena phocaenoides

Phocoena sinus

Physeteridae Sperm whales

Physeter macrocephalus

Platanistidae River dolphins

Platanista spp.

Ziphiidae Beaked whales, bottle-nosed whales

Berardius spp.

Hyperoodon spp.

 

**We believe there is due cause for our request to be noted and addressed urgently, according to the following:

 

Annex 2 a

Criteria for the inclusion of species in Appendix II in accordance with Article II, paragraph 2 (a), of the Convention

The following criteria must be read in conjunction with the definitions, explanations and guidelines listed in Annex 5, including the footnote with respect to application of the definition of ‘decline’ for commercially exploited aquatic species.

A species should be included in Appendix II when, on the basis of available trade data and information on the status and trends of the wild population(s), at least one of the following criteria is met:

A.   It is known, or can be inferred or projected, that the regulation of trade in the species is necessary to avoid it becoming eligible for inclusion in Appendix I in the near future; or

B.   It is known, or can be inferred or projected, that regulation of trade in the species is required to ensure that the harvest of specimens from the wild is not reducing the wild population to a level at which its survival might be threatened by continued harvesting or other influences.

Annex 2 b

Criteria for the inclusion of species in Appendix II in accordance with Article II, paragraph 2 (b), of the Convention

Species may be included in Appendix II in accordance with Article II, paragraph 2 (b), if either one of the following criteria is met:

A.  The specimens of the species in the form in which they are traded resemble specimens of a species included in Appendix II under the provisions of Article II, paragraph 2 (a), or in Appendix I, so that enforcement officers who encounter specimens of CITES-listed species are unlikely to be able to distinguish between them; or

B.  There are compelling reasons other than those given in criterion A above to ensure that effective control of trade in currently listed species is achieved.

 

**Countries practicing dolphin hunting and slaughter for profit (reasons other than scientific) have continued to take from the oceans for decades now. It is often, as well, (as mentioned in point A of Annex 2 b) that it is unlikely that those performing the practice of hunting and slaughtering are able to distinguish between species. While this may ‘seem’ to have little effect on their numbers, it is clear that should this continue much further, Annex 2 a .A will need to be addressed with urgency.

Aside from this we ask you to understand that cetaceans are a specialized species and some countries have indeed already granted them non-human rights.

While this may be interpreted by some as an emotional response/request, it is not. Dolphins/cetaceans have been classified as the second most intelligent species on our planet, under humans.

It is not only vital that we address this issue with urgency to ensure their numbers do not dwindle; it is also our responsibility to ensure that we share this planet with all creatures, especially those of equal intelligence. It is our duty to ensure their protection from those who seek to exploit them for profit.

With due respect and sincerity we ask that John Scalon and each member under CITES reconsider their opinions regarding the classifications and registration of all cetaceans. All ceteceans require protection. Whether cetecean meat is traded live or deceased, trade still occurs. We look to you for answers.

 

 

 

Letter to
Cites Secretariat, John Scalon - (All individual contacts to be added shortly) CITES
Register ALL cetaceans in either Appendix I or Appendix II.