Petition Closed
Petitioning At-Large Member, City Council, Washington, D.C. Vincent Orange and 11 others

Chairman, City Council, Washington, D.C.: Allow DC Residents to Vote on Banning Speed Cameras


Washington D.C.'s City Council takes the unofficial city slogan -- "Taxation Without Representation" -- seriously, so much so that it's proposed officially adding the slogan to the city's flag. Unfortunately, this concern for empowering residents to impact the way our money is collected and spent by government does not extend to traffic cameras.

D.C. resident Tom Elliott recently attempted to file paperwork for a city-wide initiative that would allow residents to vote on the continued use of traffic cameras. The Board of Elections & Ethics informed him that such a vote is prohibited, in that its outcome could result in reduced revenue for the city. After being told that the only way to remove these cameras is, a) amend the city charter to allow for such a referendum, or b) ask the City Council to take this step itself, he asked every City councilmember to initiate either of these two actions. In making this request, he noted how either of these undertakings would help ameliorate the Council's concern over D.C.' "taxation without representation." Of the 13 councilmembers contacted, only Councilmember Mary Cheh responded and she politely dismissed the idea. Three other offices sent assurances that their councilmembers would review the matter; none ever responded further.

The undersigned simply ask for our voices to be heard. Whether traffic cameras are effective at raising revenue, reducing traffic accidents, or mitigating dangerous driving are all irrelevant. Government in America is meant to be of the people, for the people, by the people. If we don't want local police to use traffic cameras, that is reason enough to discontinue their use.

In the meantime, we, the undersigned, simply seek the opportunity for our opinions to be heard.

Letter to
At-Large Member, City Council, Washington, D.C. Vincent Orange
Chairman, City Council, Washington, D.C. Kwame Brown
Chairman Pro Tempore, City Council, Washington, D.C. Mary Cheh
and 9 others
City Council, Washington, D.C. David Catania
At-Large Member, City Council, Washington, D.C. Phil Mendelson
At-Large Member, City Council, Washington, D.C. Michael Brown
Ward Member, City Council, Washington, DC Jim Graham
Ward Member, City Council, Washington, DC Jack Evans
Ward Member, City Council, Washington, DC Muriel Bowser
Ward Member, City Council, Washington, DC Tommy Wells
Ward Member, City Council, Washington, DC Yvette Alexander
Ward Member, City Council, Washington, DC Marion Barry
I just signed the following petition addressed to: Washington, DC City Council.

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Allow DC Residents to Vote on Banning Speed Cameras

Washington D.C.'s City Council takes the unofficial city slogan -- "Taxation Without Representation" -- seriously, so much so that it's proposed officially adding the slogan to the city's flag. Unfortunately, this concern for empowering residents to impact the way our money is collected and spent by government does not extend to traffic cameras.

I recently attempted to file paperwork for a city-wide initiative that would allow residents to vote on the continued use of traffic cameras. To my surprise, the Board of Elections & Ethics informed me that such a vote is prohibited, in that its outcome could result in reduced revenue for the city. After being told that the only way to remove these cameras is, a) amend the city charter to allow for such a referendum, or b) ask the City Council to take this step itself, I asked every City councilmember to initiate either of these two actions. In making this request, I noted how either of these undertakings would help ameliorate the Council's concern over D.C.' "taxation without representation." Of the 13 councilmembers contacted, only Councilmember Mary Cheh responded and she politely dismissed the idea. Three other offices sent assurances that their councilmembers would review the matter; none ever responded further.

The undersigned simply ask for our voices to be heard. Whether traffic cameras are effective at raising revenue, reducing traffic accidents, or mitigating dangerous driving are all irrelevant. Government in America is meant to be of the people, for the people, by the people. If we don't want local police to use traffic cameras, that is reason enough to discontinue their use.

In the meantime, we, the undersigned, simply seek the opportunity for our opinions to be heard.
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Sincerely,