Petition Closed

On Tuesday March 4th, 2014, Robin Thicke will be performing on BU’s campus at Agganis Arena. He is certain to accrue a lot of publicity for BU. However, Thicke’s current celebrity status is due only to his hit songs. On January 22, 2014, President Obama signed a memorandum demanding a solution to sexual assault on college campuses, to which a musical performer is not an assailant to, nor does such performer plan on committing or willfully promoting a sexual assault.

 

"Thicke’s hit song “Blurred Lines” celebrates having sex with women against their will. Lyrics such as, “I know you want it,” explicitly use non-consensual language. And while watching the extremely explicit video, the insinuations grow from subtle to explicit to obnoxious." as said by one person's interpretation of the song. However, lets go to the producer of the song, Pharrell, and see what he has to say...

"During an interview with NPR, "Blurred Lines" producer Pharrell defended the song, highlighting the lyric that man is not your maker, saying, "I don't know anything that could be more clear about our position in the song" and "...if you're looking at the lyrics, the power is right there in the woman's hand. That man — me^ "Pharrell Williams On Juxtaposition And Seeing Sounds"npr.org. December 31, 2013. Retrieved January 18, 2014. as a human being, me as a man, I'm not your maker, I can't tell you what to do.""-

 

However, another context highlights the irony of BU having Thicke perform: the feminist context of BU itself. In 1864 BU’s School of Medicine was the first in the country to award an M.D. to a black woman, Dr. Rebecca Crumpler. Other notable alumnae include Jan Felshin, an openly gay woman who advocated for girls participation in and access to sports, and Caryl Rivers, a current journalism professor who covered many pivotal moments of the second wave feminism era. In 1967, BU students rallied behind Bill Baird to challenge a Massachusetts law banning birth control. This act led Baird to win a 1972 case that legalized birth control across the entire country. Today, BU maintains a Sexual Assault Response and Prevention Center as a resource for assault survivors, and provides annual mandatory training to every student group.

Also I do not see where Robin Thicke attacks any of these standards or accomplishments of any of these women.

 

Clearly, Boston University has been a bedrock for feminism and ideologies of equality more generally.  We kindly suggest that BU continue Thicke’s performance.

 

-Excerpts from sources including: Boston University Humanists, Wikipedia, and personal though

 

To continue with this; Robin Thicke is a performer and a musician. By the OPINION some have, Blurred Lines may suggest sexual violence. However, to others it may be an expression of a woman's freedom to do as she pleases without the shackles of a man. Every musical piece leads to interpretation, but to say that Robin Thicke is advocating your OPINION, then Eminem suggests drug use, violence, murder, suicide, and sexual assault. Miley Cyrus suggests that you use your body as demolition equipment, Carrie Underwood suggests that any man doing you harm gives you the right to cause gross property damage, ETC. If you do not like a musician, you are not forced into listening to their music, going to their concerts, or paying for their merchandise. 

 

Also, by these same ideals, we should get rid of every movie and censor every show that has any kind of drug use (sorry Matrix, Wolf of Wall Street, and many more) violence (Law and Order, CSI) or tries to impress upon us ideals that some people feel aren't in line with their personal opinion of what we should listen to and view. So we can become a police state lead by people who believe their moral compass and opinion is the only sane and valid opinion available, or we can express our FIRST AMENDMENT rights to allow people to say what they legally are allowed to in the good ole U S of A. 

 

If Boston University thinks that enough people want to see a perfomer and host this performer, then they have the right to. If people didn't like him, then they wouldn't attend. People do not like the ideals impressed upon them by their interpretation of this song, but yet they try impress their ideals on everyone else as they see themselves on some higher moral ground. 

Letter to
BOSTON UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION
Allow Robin Thicke to Play