Petition Closed

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Pet stores put profit before animal welfare by contributing to an industry of puppy mills, commercial breeders and backyard breeders. They encourage impulse buying, do not properly screen homes or educate buyers, and keep the young animals in a non-ideal environment.

Letter to
Mayor Bob Bratina
Editor Paul Berton
The Spec JPoling
and 16 others
The Spec Sherron
Judi Partridge
Robert Pasuta
Russ Powers
Lloyd Ferguson
Brenda Johnson
Maria Pearson
Brad Clark
Terry Whitehead
Scott Duvall
Tom Jackson
Chad Collins
Sam Merulla
Jason Farr
Brian McHattie
Bernie Morelli
Pet stores put profit before animal welfare by contributing to an industry of puppy mills, commercial breeders and backyard breeders. They encourage impulse buying, do not properly screen homes or educate buyers, and keep the young animals in a non-ideal environment.

Many Canadians are outraged that pet stores across the country continue to sell pets in stores; as you may know, Toronto city council passed a bylaw in 2011 that would ban the sale of puppies and kittens in pet stores. Councillor Glenn De Baeremaeker put forward the motion, saying that pet stores that sell animals are bad for pets and consumers.

“They’re kept in small cages, they’re not socialized, they have immense health problems,” he said. “Consumers are getting ripped off.”

The bylaw states that shops cannot sell dogs or cats unless the animals come from a municipal shelter, a Humane Society or registered rescue group. “It really slams the door closed on people who mass produce animals for profit,” said Mr. De Baeremaeker.

This is an opportunity for your Hamilton to be at the forefront of this movement by passing legislation to help protect these animals - and perhaps improve the reputation of the city, which is known for its killings at the Hamilton Animal Services.

We urge stores opt to bring rescued cats and dogs into the stores from local shelters to help re-home them instead of being a part of an industry that harms these animals. Thousands of animals are put down every year by the Hamilton Animal Services. Stopping the sale of pets in stores will both reduce the number of new, unspayed or unneutered animals entering the community, and help find homes for those animals already in shelters.

Pet stores can actually benefit from going puppy-free, and signing the Humane Society International pledge to becoming a puppy-friendly store. Not only will this create a more positive image for the stores, but the Humane Society also offers special perks and publicity for new stores that join their program.