Topic

voting rights

138 petitions

Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to Alameda County Board of Supervisors

Representation Matters

The boundaries of the five Alameda County Supervisorial Districts will be redrawn in 2021 and we respectfully ask the Board of Supervisors to establish an equitable redistricting plan with robust public outreach. We appreciate the Board’s dedication to inclusion and civic engagement. As such, the redistricting plan should include sufficient time and funding to engage communities in an inclusive manner. Meetings should be held at diverse times and days, before and after district maps are drawn. Communities should be empowered to provide input through various platforms and technological portals that allow real time engagement with draft maps. Leveraging the recent network developed to support the Complete Count as well as the Municipal Advisory Councils (MAC) can advance voting rights through civic engagement and ensure broad outreach throughout the county. In this way, the County district boundaries can be redrawn to ensure that representation is spread evenly.    Why does this matter? With the completion of the 2020 Census, the Board of Supervisors will reconsider the boundaries for the five Supervisorial districts. With a budget of $3.5 billion per year and 1.7 million constituents, Alameda County has considerable influence and impact. The county budgets $2,000 per resident, much of it on social services and critical infrastructure like public health and safety. The partitioning of election districts determines how our communities are represented on the board, how many votes a particular area has on issues, and which communities are divided or consolidated. The final maps approved in 2021 will be in place for the next 10 years. Until recently, there were few requirements that redistricting be fair and transparent. Historically, marginalized communities had little engagement. In fact, the 2011 county redistricting had significantly less public engagement, i.e. fewer meetings, and less transparency, than it did in 2001. Consistent with the letter* submitted earlier this year by the League of Women Voters, we see an opportunity for the upcoming round of redistricting in 2021, to engage more deeply with marginalized communities. A new law (AB 849, Bonta) mandates criteria for standardized and fair redistricting. It keeps neighborhoods and diverse communities intact, and prohibits partisan gerrymandering. The law requires local governments to engage communities in the redistricting process, to hold a minimum number of public hearings, and to reach out to non-English-speaking communities. The Complete Count for the 2020 Census has brought together a network of partners and digital platforms for meaningful community engagement that can be leveraged for this effort. We’d also urge the County to adopt the best practices guide** developed by Asian Americans Advancing Justice–Asian Law Caucus, to reach out to all communities, especially historically underrepresented populations. Now is the time for the county to fully embrace the spirit of AB 849 and to be a model of inclusion and transparency. *https://drive.google.com/file/d/1de0KQj7upeowMRqwP9-HASkOuwpA_CDG/view?usp=sharing **https://www.advancingjustice-alc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Guide-to-Districting-Best-Practices-AAAJ-ALC.pdf

Alameda County Coalition for Fair Redistricting
640 supporters
Started 4 days ago

Petition to BILL LEE, Brenda Gillmore, Heidi Campbell, Jeff Yarbro

End Voter Disenfranchisement in TN

According to Tennessee law, every Tennessee resident who has been convicted of a felony loses their right to vote for the rest of their life. There are 11 states in the country who permanently strip people convicted of a felony of their right to vote, but the rate of disenfranchisement in TN is the 2nd worst in the entire country, according to data from the 2020 Sentencing Project. Currently 9% of all eligible voters are unable to vote in Tennessee due to the felony disenfranchisement law and this law disproportionately affects African Americans and Latinx Americans. 21.5% of African American voters and 10.5% of Latinx American voters are without a voice and without a vote at the federal, state, and local level. That's 175,000 African Americans and 11,000 Latinx Americans in our state who are denied the right to vote in every election for the rest of their life and that number is growing by the day. As Tennessee residents, we cannot let this egregious law continue to silence the voices of so many in the state. Fortunately, Article 4, Section 2 of the Tennessee State Constitution states that "laws may be passed excluding from the right of suffrage persons who may be convicted of infamous crimes". "Infamous crimes" is a subjective term that's definition that currently means "conviction for any felony", but this definition can be changed with a new state law. Sign this petition to show your state lawmakers that you support changing Tennessee's law to allow people the right to vote after they complete their sentence.

Lauren Gish
166 supporters
Started 1 week ago

Petition to U.S. Senate

Take Initiative: Vote YES for S. 1, the For The People Act

In the modern age, we should work to develop a democracy that works to enable Americans to vote efficiently and have their voices be heard. Creating new barriers to voting works to repress the voices of the masses while also tarnishing the integrity of our democracy. To date, more than 360 bills to restrict voting access have been proposed in 47 states. These measures disproportionately harm and target voters of color, young voters, and voters with disabilities. It is essential that the Senate passes the For the People Act (S1).  The For the People Act will set voting standards for the public so every individual has equal access to the ballot box regardless of race, age, or location. The voter registration process would be streamlined and allow for less difficult voting situations, such as having voters be marked as inactive if their location changes. The bill will work to ensure more secure and accessible voting options with the expansion of absentee and early voting locations to reduce the traffic flow on Election Day. In addition to this, it would also restore the right to vote to people who have completed their felony sentences and declare that Washington, D.C., residents deserve full voting rights and representation by supporting D.C. statehood. This democracy reform bill will work to benefit the American people through putting the power back into the hands of the voters. want and deserve.  This legislation will make voting easier and more accessible with many groups benefiting greatly; for example, college students often struggle to have accessibility in regards to voting in their college communities, but the expansion of accessible options will work to help them participate in the political process. Bills have gotten passed in the House of Representatives and stalled in the Senate for years. We cannot let S1 follow suit and instead we must take initiative to advocate for our democracy.  The For the People Act will work toward: Modernizing our voter registration system  Restoring voting rights for formerly-incarcerated  Adding transparency to private money in politics Take action today by signing this petition and contacting your Senators! Tell them to support the For the People Act and bring power back to the people.  Use this toll-free number to get in touch with your Senator: 1-888-453-3211

Democracy Matters SBU
10 supporters