Topic

urban planning

48 petitions

Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to Birmingham City Council and the West Midlands Mayor

To create a public park in the centre of Birmingham

Birmingham does not have a large park in its city centre - a glaring omission for the UK's second city. However, we currently have a unique opportunity to address this and it’s now or never! With the wholesale markets in Digbeth set to move, a large space of 14 hectares (about the size of 20 football pitches) will be created. This site, called Birmingham Smithfield, which is less than 5 minutes’ walk from New Street station and the Bullring, is an ideal location for a green park that could truly transform our city’s landscape. Unfortunately, according to its Visioning Document released in 2015, the council had other ideas and wanted to build on it, with very little public space and certainly no park as part of their plans. In March 2016, the council then released the Smithfield Masterplan and a new consultation, which this time included a proposal for a new park on one part of the site, as a direct result of this petition that was started in 2015 by CityPark4Brum. However the space allocated for this park is simply too small, being smaller than the Cathedral Green and is wedged in between other buildings. Therefore the CityPark4Brum campaign is continuing and is now into its third year. This petition presents an alternative vision for the site in accommodating cultural buildings, markets and transport links within one large area of open and green space, with new homes connected to it. Large parks like the one we are proposing provide the lungs and fresh air for a city and are good for both the private and public purse. In particular they improve our physical and mental health, promote social cohesion, reduce pollution and provide a site for open-air events.  Did you know that the council’s own Parks and Open Spaces Strategy (Section 5.4) highlights a lack of existing public open space in the city centre? In wards that cover the Digbeth area, the current open space provision is much lower than the council's target of 2 hectares per 1000 residents. Now 2000 additional homes are being proposed in the Masterplan with clearly an insufficient amount of new open space to go with it. Eastside Park and the Cathedral Green are the only green areas in or very near to the city centre for local residents and visitors. Other global cities are known and celebrated for having large parks at their centres, for example London, Berlin, New York and Washington. In fact, Central Park in New York is the city's main visitor attraction and generates $1Billion annually to the local economy. There is no doubt that global cities benefit from having large parks at their centres. The wholesale markets site is the last area of large open space left in Birmingham’s city centre that could be transformed in this way. So now it’s our turn and our last chance to have a large city centre park. Situated right next to the Bullring, it would be the missing piece of the jigsaw, a green hub that connects different parts of the city, making a legacy for generations to come. So please join the campaign to turn a brownfield site into a green one by signing this petition and following CityPark4Brum updates on Twitter, FaceBook and Instagram. The original petition was submitted to Birmingham City Council as part of their Smithfield consultations in 2015 and 2016. The new objective for 2018 is to send the updated petition to both the council and to Andy Street, the new West Midlands Mayor. So the CityPark4Brum campaign is still very much alive with new petition supporters and comments welcome.

James Tucker
6,617 supporters
Update posted 2 months ago

Petition to Glasgow City Council, Historic Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon MSP

Restore Govan Graving Docks in Glasgow to create a shipbuilding heritage park #SaveGovanDocks

We the undersigned request Glasgow City Council, along with other relevant stakeholders, support the renovation of the Govan Graving Docks at Clydebrae Street in Glasgow to create a shipbuilding heritage park on the site. As much as possible of the existing dock structure should be retained, including the renovation of the pump house building as a café and visitor centre. The site is Category-A listed and identified in the Register for Scotland as being at risk. It is a significant part of the city’s industrial heritage however since closing down it has fallen into disrepair through years of neglect. It consists of three large drydocks that were capable of accommodating the largest ships in the world when they were built. The dock walls are of solid granite and despite showing much cosmetic wear they are likely to be structurally intact. Most other docks in Glasgow have been filled in to make way for modern developments and this is one of the few remaining docks on the Clyde, apart from those still in operation, that have not been completely filled and built over. As such any modern developments that would destroy the character of the site should be ruled out. A shipbuilding heritage park would be a major tourist attraction for Glasgow and fit well with other redevelopments in the surrounding area such as Pacific Quay and the Riverside Museum. Further information on the site is available at http://www.buildingsatrisk.org.uk/details/909298 The site is one of the most important features of Glasgow's industrial heritage and represents a major opportunity to educate future generations about the city's past in a way that is more meaningful than looking at old photographs in a museum. Glasgow was once at the forefront of global shipping and there is still potential for Govan Graving Docks to be used partly as a working dry dock again. This could allow restoration of historic ships to de done as a key feature of the development. A shipbuilding heritage park it has been estimated could create up to 250+ meaningful long term jobs and learning opportunities for young people in heritage, skills preservation, leisure, tourism and urban ecology. This would be a major boost to a city that is seeing a proliferation of low-grade retail. If developers are allowed to build luxury flats on these docks then this opportunity will be lost forever.

Iain McGillivray
12,111 supporters