Topic

Technology

294 petitions

Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to Federal Communications Commission, U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives

Save Net Neutrality

The ability to organize grassroots movements, whether locally or across the globe, is made possible by an open Internet. Since its creation, the Internet has become the world’s megaphone for free speech, protected by the principles of Net Neutrality, which require internet service providers (ISPs) to give everyone equal access to everything you use the internet for -- email, watching videos, listening to music, or signing petitions on Change.org.  Without Net Neutrality, ISPs can choose what you see online, favoring some sources or blocking others. For example, if someone launched a petition on Change.org against a company like Verizon, Net Neutrality prevents Verizon from blocking or slowing their customers’ access to our site.   In December of 2017, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted 3-2 to repeal net neutrality rules -- giving big cable companies room to charge extra fees, block and censor users. By removing ISPs from Title II of the Communications Act, a rule that means ISPs are subjected to tougher regulations that prevent them blocking sites, creating paid “fast” lanes, and throttling internet speeds. This decision will have global implications for the way the world shares and receives information from journalists, newsrooms, and NGO’s. However, following the FCC’s vote, Senator Ed Markey (D-Mass.) announced a Congressional Review Act resolution that if passed, would stop net neutrality repeal. That resolution now has the support of 50 senate members, which means just one more vote is needed for it to pass the Senate. Net Neutrality also prevents ISPs from creating paid “fast lanes” that would give faster delivery of content to companies who can afford to pay more. An organization or platform like Change.org that couldn’t afford those fees, couldn’t communicate with their supporters.  In the United States, there is strong bipartisan support for Net Neutrality. A recent poll conducted by Mozilla found that Republicans, Democrats and Independents overwhelmingly support these rules.  At Change.org, we believe that people everywhere should have the tools they need to make their voices heard. We’re a social good company powered by technology that empowers anyone anywhere to take action on the issues they care about. A closed off Internet means fewer ways for millions of people to make the change they want to see. Without an internet equally accessible to everyone regardless of income or geography, we can’t continue that mission. Add your name to let Congress and the FCC know that you support an open internet.

Change.org
2,404,522 supporters
Update posted 3 days ago

Petition to Jack Dorsey, Anthony Noto, Adam Messinger, Vijaya Gadde, Leslie Berland

Suspend or Cancel Trump's Twitter Account

To the Chief Officers at Twitter: We the undersigned believe that presidential candidate, president-elect, and now president* Donald J. Trump has abused his Twitter account in such a way as warrants cancellation or suspension. We are grateful that you have already banned neo-Nazi Richard Spencer, Trump advisor Roger Stone, and others for violating Twitter rules, and ask that D.J. Trump not be allowed to continue violating those same rules with impunity. We also understand that tweeting is not a First Amendment right, as discussed in Salon, as explained clearly by CNN, and even addressed in a Twitter forum. Tweeting is speech conducted on a privately-run online platform governed by community standards and terms-of-service agreements. Even the ACLU said in August 2017 that it will no longer defend hate speech, particularly that of neo-Nazi, white supremacists. All of us recognize that Trump has in effect weaponized Twitter in an unfair and dangerous manner. Twitter policy states: All users must adhere to the policies set forth in the Twitter Rules. Failure to do so may result in the temporary locking and/or permanent suspension of account(s). Trump has demonstrably violated the following rules: Unlawful use: You may not use our service for any unlawful purposes or in furtherance of illegal activities. His vindictive Dec. 6 Tweet aimed at Boeing led directly to significant drop in stock price. His Dec. 12 Tweet aimed at Lockheed Martin, precipitating a 4% drop in stock value. Abusive Behavior: Violent threats (direct or indirect): You may not make threats of violence or promote violence, including threatening or promoting terrorism. The cyberbullying of steelworker union chief Chuck Jones, directly leading to death threats, was reported Dec. 8 in the NY Times. Harassment: You may not incite or engage in the targeted abuse or harassment of others. Trump's attack on a female college student is another example wherein the power of Twitter combined with Trump's status has directly resulted in personal destruction. Hateful conduct: You may not promote violence against or directly attack or threaten other people on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, religious affiliation, age, disability, or disease. Trump's Nov. 30 Tweet threatening refugees is notable here as was his infamous rant against the American judge of Mexican descent. More recently we have the threatening of sports figures (whom he called "sons of bitches") exercising their freedom of speech, and the shameful attacks on the Mayor of San Juan while she deals with a catastrophe in Puerto Rico. These are just a few examples of violations that form a clear pattern, clear enough so that his Twitter abuse of nearly 300 people was graphically summarized in the New York Times. For these and other reasons the case has already been made by journalists for banning Trump from Twitter. Not included in the above is Trump's use of Twitter to avoid the press, whose duty it is to critically report to the public. Another category not found in Twitter rules is the reckless endangerment of entire populations. Trump's Dec. 22, 2016 tweet regarding nuclear weapons shows how the abuse of Twitter may accelerate global annihilation. His current tweets regarding North Korea undermine his own diplomats while moving us closer to nuclear conflict. And who's going to follow your rules if you change them to accommodate a single user who cannot follow them? Shameful.  Since Trump has taken office, his use of Twitter to spread misinformation has accelerated to such a degree that it cannot be chronicled here. He lies to sheriffs, to the military, to the press, to his supporters, and repeats it all on Twitter. He has interfered in the prosecution of a terrorist by Tweeting his advocacy of the death penalty. He routinely attacks the judiciary, senators, companies who don't like his brand, and anybody that criticizes him, often using misinformation. Ultimately it is up to the officers of Twitter whether Trump is allowed to continue abusing people, institutions, corporations, and the planet with your powerful technology. To be blunt, Twitter is becoming with each day more complicit in everything Trump does and will do. People are increasingly demanding an explanation for Twitter's failure to enforce its rules, and the justification offered so far--that his tweets are newsworthy--is nothing more than greed. Ask yourselves, do you want to be remembered as the corporation that helped start World War III? We hope you make the right decision, and soon.  Thank you for your attention. To be delivered to: JACK DORSEY Chief Executive Officer @jack ANTHONY NOTO Chief Operating Officer & Chief Financial Officer @anthonynoto ADAM MESSINGER Chief Technology Officer @adam_messinger VIJAYA GADDE General Counsel @vijaya LESLIE BERLAND Chief Marketing Officer @leslieberland

Chris Monroe
14,471 supporters
Update posted 3 days ago

Petition to Apple, Phil Schiller, Dan Riccio, Craig Federighi, Eddy Cue, Jony Ive, Tim Cook

Apple: Recall MacBook Pro w/ Defective Keyboard, Replace with DIFFERENT Working Keyboard

Apple, it's time: recall every MacBook Pro released since Late 2016, and replace the keyboards on all of them with new, redesigned keyboards that just work. Because, these keyboards don't work. Every one of Apple's current-gen MacBook Pro models, 13" and 15", is sold with a keyboard that can become defective at any moment due to a design failure. The problems are widespread, consistent, and infuriating. Casey Johnston:“My one-year-old MacBook Pro's keyboard keys stopped working if a single piece of dust slipped under there, and more importantly, neither Apple nor its Geniuses would acknowledge that this was actually a problem…. Since I wrote about my experience, many have asked me what happened with the new top half of the computer that the Apple Geniuses installed, with its pristine keyboard and maybe-different key switches. The answer is that after a couple of months, I started to get temporarily dead keys for seemingly no reason. Again.”Jason Snell:“Apple’s relative silence on this issue for existing customers is deafening. If these problems are remotely as common as they seem to be, this is an altogether defective product that should be recalled.”John Gruber:“This keyboard has to be one of the biggest design screwups in Apple history. Everyone who buys a MacBook depends upon the keyboard and this keyboard is undependable.” Jonathan Mann:“I’m pressing the spacebar and nothing is happening!” Marco Arment:“Butterfly keyswitches are a design failure…. they are fatally unreliable.” Mike Wuerthele:“The failure rate of the keyboard in the first year on the 2016 MacBook Pro is a ticking time bomb for users.” I'm writing this petition on a Late 2016 13" MBP keyboard with a defective L key and a defective Shift Key. Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't. Oh boy, do I just ove proofreading my text to find missing Ls. Not. And, I meant 'love.' L key didn’t work there. Yes, I took this machine to a Genius Bar. They replaced the L key. The replacement L key failed. Then the Shift key failed. If you, Apple, want to continue to pretend this isn’t a problem, your head is buried deep in the silicon. “Design is how it works.” These don’t. Everyone who bought this computer bought a Lemon, or at the least, a potential Lemon when one speck of dust gets under the keys. There should be a Lemon Law for laptops. Appe, (yup - the L key failed again), I am tempted to write a bunch of stuff about how I’ve been using Apple computers since 1981, how I’ve purchased tens of thousands of dollars of your gear, how I’ve recommended you to all of my friends and colleagues. But, I really shouldn’t have to say all of that because this issue should matter to you whether I’m a long-term Apple customer, or this MacBook Pro was my first-ever purchase. This should matter to you because you should care about Apple products working. Given the denial and obfuscation with which your customer service team has handled this issue, I have lost a lot of faith. Recalling all of these MBPs would be costly. Billions? It would be a recall of perhaps unprecedented size, implications, and complexity.And, it’s the right thing to do. If you can incinerate tens of billions on a stock repurchase program that creates nothing of real value, surely you can deploy some of your cash hoard for replacement laptop keyboards that work.To be clear: we don’t want another of the same keyboard, which is going to fail again, as Casey Johnston’s replacement did. We want a redesigned keyboard, that works reliably. Stand behind your signature. P.S. - And no, we don’t want a can of compressed air. The fact that you have a support page about that is not only perplexing — we never had to use compressed air on past MacBook Pro keyboards — it's a sign of Big Problems in Cupertino. P.P.S. - For the Jim Dalrympes of the world who like this keyboard and have been lucky enough not to experience key failures, we are not proposing a forcible recall. If those folks, with full awareness of this problem, want to play Russian Roulette and hope their keyboards don't fail later, let them. We are requesting a recall program to provide redesigned, replacement keyboards for those of us who want our keyboards to work reliably, and for consumers who may not even be aware of the 'ticking time bomb' they own. Sorry I misspelled your, surname, Jim. The L key failed. Again.

Matthew Taylor
27,753 supporters