Topic

students

646 petitions

Update posted 6 hours ago

Petition to Punahou School Librarians

HEAR EVERYONE'S VOICE ABT SILENT STUDY TIME IN COOKE LEARNING COMMONS @ PUNAHOU SCHOOL

Starting Monday 9/25/17, effective until someone speaks out about this, the librarians in the Cooke Learning Commons at Punahou School have implemented silent study time daily from 10:30am-12:30pm across the entire library. Students cannot even whisper, which hinders group project work or help from peers on homework. The library already has a silent section for those who want it, I don't see how silence across the entire library is necessary. This change is "based on [peer] input from the Silent Study Space Survey". As someone who frequents the library at least once a school day, this came as a shock to me. Never once was it brought to my attention this survey was going on. I didn't get a form sent to my email (which is usually how surveys are conducted here at Punahou), and I didn't see anything in the library the weeks before about a survey. This raises the question as to who are my peers who took this survey? I've asked quite a few people, and no one has taken or known someone who has taken this survey. I then asked a librarian this question to which she responded that this survey was randomly conducted. This means that many people did not have the chance participate in this survey, and the sample of those surveyed was not a large enough number to truly reflect how students feel about this silent study. I’m so frustrated that my voice and many other voices were not heard, and it seems that we are irrelevant. Thank you for taking the time to read this petition. If many people are interested in signing this, I will present this to the deans or librarians so that we can encourage a new survey to be made and sent to the entire Academy to participate in, because everyone's voice deserves to be heard, not just a select few.

Punahou Student
156 supporters
This petition won 11 hours ago

Petition to U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives

Offer Computer Science in our public schools

America should be a leader in computer science education, yet today most schools don't even offer this foundational subject. Please join the CEOs, governors, and education leaders below and ask Congress to support computer science in every K-12 school – for our children, and for their future. Every student in America should have this opportunity. Dear Members of Congress and fellow Americans, As business leaders, elected officials, educators, and members of the public, we join forces to deliver a bipartisan message about opportunity and the American Dream.  Technology is transforming society at an unprecedented rate. Whether it’s smartphones or social networks, self-driving cars or personalized medicine, nothing embodies the American Dream so much as the opportunity to change or even reinvent the world with technology. And participating in this world requires access to computer science in our schools. We ask you to provide funding for every student in every school to have an opportunity to learn computer science. Support for this idea is sweeping our nation. Ninety percent of parents want their children to have access to computer science education at school, and teachers agree. They know that technology opens doors. A hundred thousand teachers have taken matters into their own hands and already begun teaching computer science. Over 100 school districts are rolling out courses, from New York to Chicago to Los Angeles, from Miami to Las Vegas. Twenty states have passed policies and are now looking to support professional training for new computer science teachers. Private donors have collectively committed tens of millions of dollars to solving this problem, including $48 million of new commitments announced today by many of the undersigned. Despite this groundswell, three-quarters of U.S. schools do not offer meaningful computer science courses. At a time when every industry in every state is impacted by advances in computer technology, our schools should give all students the opportunity to understand how this technology works, to learn how to be creators, coders, and makers — not just consumers. Instead, what is increasingly a basic skill is only available to the lucky few, leaving most students behind, particularly students of color and girls. How is this acceptable? America leads the world in technology. We invented the personal computer, the Internet, e-commerce, social networking, and the smartphone. This is our chance to position the next generation to participate in the new American Dream. Not only does computer science provide every student foundational knowledge, it also leads to the highest-paying, fastest-growing jobs in the U.S. economy. There are currently over 500,000 open computing jobs, in every sector, from manufacturing to banking, from agriculture to healthcare, but only 50,000 computer science graduates a year. Whether a student aspires to be a software engineer, or if she just wants a well-rounded education in today’s changing world, access to computer science in school is an economic imperative for our nation to remain competitive. And with the growing threat of cyber warfare, this is even a critical matter of national security. Despite this growing need, targeted federal funding to carry out these efforts in classrooms is virtually non-existent. This bipartisan issue can be addressed without growing the federal budget. We urge you to amplify and accelerate the local efforts in classrooms, unlock opportunity in every state, and give an answer to all the parents and teachers who believe that every student, in every school, should have a chance to learn computer science. Sincerely, Business LeadersArne Sorenson, CEO, Marriott Barry Diller, Chairman, IAC and Expedia Bill and Melinda Gates Bobby Kotick, CEO, Activision Blizzard Brad Smith, President, MicrosoftBrian Chesky, CEO, AirbnbBrian Cornell, Chairman and CEO, TargetDoug McMillon, CEO, WalmartDaniel Schulman, CEO, Paypal. Chairman, SymantecDara Khosrowshahi, CEO, ExpediaDevin Wenig, CEO, eBayDrew Houston, CEO, DropboxDoug Parker, Chairman and CEO, American AirlinesEdward Breen, Chairman and CEO, DuPontEric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Alphabet, Inc.Ginni Rometty, Chairman and CEO, IBMGrant Verstandig, CEO, Rally HealthHerb Allen, President, Allen & CompanyJack Dorsey, CEO, Twitter and SquareJames Murdoch, CEO, 21st Century FoxJames P. Gorman, Chairman and CEO, Morgan StanleyJeff Bezos, Chairman and CEO, AmazonJeremy Stoppelman, CEO, YelpJessica Alba, CEO, The Honest CompanyJoe Lonsdale, Partner, 8VC. Founder, PalantirJohn Battelle, Chairman and CEO, NewCoJohn Donahoe, Chairman, PaypalJohn J. Legere – President & CEO, T-Mobile US, Inc.Julie Sweet, Chief Executive, Accenture North AmericaLarry EllisonLarry Fink, Chairman and CEO, BlackRockLowell McAdam, Chairman and CEO, VerizonMarc Benioff, Chairman and CEO, SalesforceMark Cuban, Owner, Dallas Mavericks, Landmark TheatresMark Zuckerberg, Chairman and CEO, FacebookOscar Munoz, CEO, United AirlinesRami Rahim, CEO, Juniper NetworksRandall Stephenson, Chairman and CEO, AT&TReid Hoffman, Chairman, LinkedInRich Barton, Chairman, ZillowRichard Anderson, CEO, Delta AirlinesRobert A. Iger, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney CompanySam Altman, President, Y CombinatorSamuel Allen, Chairman and CEO, John DeereSatya Nadella, CEO, MicrosoftSheryl Sandberg, COO, FacebookTerry J. Lundgren, Chairman and CEO, Macy's, IncTim Cook, CEO, AppleVishal Sikka, CEO, Infosys GovernorsAsa Hutchinson, Governor, Arkansas (R)Brian Sandoval, Governor, Nevada (R)C.L. "Butch" Otter, Governor, Idaho (R)Charlie Baker, Governor, Massachusetts (R)Dannell P. Malloy, Governor, Connecticut (D)David Y. Ige, Governor, Hawaii (D)Doug Ducey, Governor, Arizona (R)Earl Ray Tomblin, Governor, West Virginia (D)Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor, California (D)Gina M. Raimondo, Governor, Rhode Island (D)Jack Dalrymple, Governor, North Dakota (R)Jack Markell, Governor, Delaware (D)Jay Inslee, Governor, Washington (D)John Hickenlooper, Governor, Colorado (D)Kate Brown, Governor, Oregon (D)Maggie Hassan, Governor, New Hampshire (D)Mark Dayton, Governor, Minnesota (D)Mary Fallin, Governor, Oklahoma (R)Matt Bevin, Governor, Kentucky (R)Matt Mead, Governor, Wyoming (R)Mike Pence, Governor, Indiana (R)Peter Shumlin, Governor, Vermont (D)Phil Bryant, Governor, Mississippi (R)Rick Snyder, Governor, Michigan (R)Steve Bullock, Governor, Montana (D)Susana Martinez, Governor, New Mexico (R)Terry Branstad, Governor, Iowa (R)Terry McAuliffe, Governor, Virginia (D) K-12 LeadersAntwan Wilson, Superintendent, OaklandBob Runcie, Superintendent, Broward County Public SchoolsCarmen Fariña, Chancellor, NYC Department of EducationForrest Claypool, CEO, Chicago Public SchoolsKenneth Huewitt, Interim Superintendent, Houston ISDKimberly Hill, Superintendent, Charles County Public SchoolsMichelle King, Superintendent, Los Angeles UnifiedPat Skorkowsky, Superintendent, Clark County School DistrictRichard Carranza, Superintendent, San Francisco UnifiedRichard Woods, State Superintendent, GeorgiaSusan Enfield, Superintendent, Highline Public SchoolsTom Torlakson, State Superintendent, California EducationNonprofit LeadersBobby Schnabel, CEO, Association for Computing MachineryCornell Brooks, President and CEO, NAACPDaniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents AssociationDavid Coleman, CEO, College BoardElisa Villanueva Beard, CEO, Teach For AmericaGail Connelly, ED, National Association of Elementary School PrincipalsHadi Partovi, CEO, Code.orgJudy Vredenburgh, President and CEO, Girls Inc.Lee Hood, MD, PhD, President, Institute for Systems Biology. Co-founder, AmgenLinda D. Hallman, CEO, American Association of University WomenLucy Sanders, CEO, National Center for Women and ITMark Nelson, Executive Director, CS Teachers AssociationMatthew Randazzo, CEO, National Math & Science InitiativePeggy Brookins, CEO, National Board for Professional Teaching StandardsTelle Whitney, CEO, Anita Borg Institute for Women and TechnologyThomas J. Gentzel, Executive Director, National School Boards AssociationVince Bertram, CEO, Project Lead The Way     Please join us. After signing, please spread the word. 

CS Education Coalition, in partnership with Code.org
140,686 supporters
Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to Jerome Webster, John Kasich, Kathleen S. Tighe, Rob Portman, Sherrod Brown, Steven Arndt, Marcy Kaptur

Stop Terra State Community College's unethical behaviors!

Terra State Community College has unethically practiced lying to their students to collect FAFSA & out of pocket student money; while I was trying to enroll to further my education there, I was a person this happened to. This is something everyone needs to be aware of, so they won't do this to future students! After signing up for classes at TSCC, I was forced to withdrawal after finding out from the financial aid department that I was not going to be eligible for aid. The woman working the financial aid center proceeded to tell me I was still in period to drop classes and I would not be penalized for the rest of the semester’s tuition. So essentially she explained that the drop period was the same thing as the refund period, misleading and outright lying to me. She even went as far to pull up their calendar to point out I had a few days left to “drop my classes without being penalized financially, with the exception of not receiving my original first months payment to the school”. Seeing as this was her job, to give me the best advice for my situation, I did what she advised and dropped from my classes because I knew I would not have enough money to pay out of pocket. Returning the next semester, with my FAFSA already approved, I was told I could not register for classes because my school account was on a hold. I was then instructed to file an appeal to the school. I did so, twice. Come to find out, ironically enough, my first appeal was never filed. Somehow the school “lost it”. Literally months went by without getting any return response from Terra Community College. No response from either appeal I filed, and of course nothing back from any of the phone calls I made up to the institution asking for answers. Trying to get anything back from the school I then contacted Jerome Webster. After explaining the situation, I guess Doctor Webster had decided that it wasn't worth his time and immediately passed it off to Cory Stine: Vice President of Institutional Advancement. I was contacted by Mr. Stine one time in total, when I was unavailable at work. He left me a message with his contact information and I was never able to get into contact with him. Every time I called his secretary would say that Mr. Stine was unavailable or that he was going to be out of the office for extended periods of time. I left countless messages trying to receive a return phone call, but it never came. The last time I had called Mr. Stine's office was the day I was told he would be back from a two week absence and when I called that day I was informed he would be unavailable for another week. Finally, I decided this was unacceptable and I wanted to speak with someone that day! I did receive a phone call, from Terra's financial aid department. Once again I explained the situation and the woman on the other end of the phone laughed. She went on to say that “it was impossible that had happened and that I should have known that my financial aid wasn't going to go through, I should have thought about not being able to afford classes that before enrolling at their institution, and this was now your (my) problem”. It’s not only frustrating to not only be belittled by someone whose literal job is to advise students financially, but to also be called a liar. That's absolutely unacceptable. A few more months went by. Obviously I was unable to continue my education at Terra, so I selected another institution to follow through with my studies. When transferring to my current institution, Ohio Business College required information from Terra to complete my new financial aid. Again, hesitant to even talk to anyone at Terra, I called up to the school. Speaking to someone, who I believe was part of the records department, I was told that I could not have access to any of my school information; violating my FERPA rights. For a second time, I emailed Terra's president Doctor Webster. This time he pawned me off on Heath Martin Dean of Students and Enrollment. While he did provide me with the correct documentation and a phone conference to discuss the events of what had happened, he failed to resolve ‘my problem’ that was caused by Terra's faculty. Speaking with Mr. Martin, he essentially summed up for me that it's acceptable for their employees to lie and swindle students, having no reasoning as to why it was ok that their financial aid department either 1. Lied to me or 2. Did not have the sufficient knowledge to accurately guide students in making important financial decisions. Therefore, this leaves TSCC at fault because regardless of how you look at it their faculty was not correctly doing their job. He then continued on to tell me he had signed documentation from an orientation in which I never attended. Wanting a copy of this information, and knowing I’m in a tight financial situation being a single unemployed mother, he maliciously told me that I would have to pay for any of the paperwork I had filed with the school. I was set up by this school to be swindled out of my money. When a student goes to a financial aid department at a school, they should be able to confidently trust what they are being told. This was not the case at Terra State Community College. To try and settle this once and for all I filed with the Department of Education. They dismissed my case, and I learned quite a few shocking things. 1. I was eligible for aid that semester. I was lead to believe that I would not have any funds to be dispersed by TSCC's financial aid the day I withdrew from my classes.  2. Either the TSCC financial aid worker was not educated for their job, or they intentionally mislead me to believe that the drop period was what the school considers to be a refund period. When I unenrolled for classes they described the drop period as "a period where the student would not be held accountable for the remaining tuition. Although, would not receive the first month's payment towards classes back". Seeing as the academic calendar used states NOTHING about a refund period on the single sheet of paper they cherry picked from their handbook, in addition to the 29 other students (now 30 students in total- including myself) & 2 former financial aid employees that have now come forward to say very similar instances have occurred, I believe it's safe to say TSCC is intentionally practicing fraud. I beg you to hear this story. Help me stop what this school is doing; it's wrong. A school should help try to better it's students, not treat them like disposable pieces of garbage. TSCC needs to be held accountable & responsible for their actions. They need to acknowledge all of these students they have wronged and not only apologize but make things right by keeping their word. Respect, honesty, and integrity are core values I take very seriously. For TSCC to be an institution that claims to have values of "relationships, learning, integrity, and innovation", they should really re-evaluate calling a group of people trying to better their education "liars" when they are indeed actually the ones at fault. Thank you so much for your time! https://failedleadershiprevealed.com/

Kristen Todd
199 supporters