Topic

social justice

144 petitions

Update posted 7 hours ago

Petition to Kelli Linville, April Barker, Gene Knutson, Daniel Hammill, Whatcom County Council, Bellingham City Council, Michael Lilliquist, Pinky Vargas, Terry Bornemann, Roxanne Murphy

Bellingham Publicly Owned Fiber Optic Network

Publicly Owned Fiber Optic Internet As other cities embrace high-speed fiber broadband, Bellingham is getting left far behind. Our city has underutilized public fiber resources and several local Internet Service Providers eager to deploy high speed broadband, like they have in Mount Vernon, yet this is held back by rules and regulations that have not kept pace with technology. Fiber would: Create an opportunity for a public access component to make ultra high speed internet broadly accessible in public spaces, provide higher quality low-income connections to those in need, and guarantee a level of internet access to all. Give Bellingham a strong standing among Washington cities, and create valuable infrastructure that we could continue to build on in the long-term. Create jobs: Fiber would draw companies to the city, provide jobs for construction and maintenance, create new internet service providers and other innovative businesses that are made possible by ultra-fast broadband. Reduce Our Impact on the Environment: Fiber would reduce the need for travel to take place for meetings. It is also very durable and usually requires less maintenance than old infrastructure wiring, like copper wiring.   Increase property values: Wiring for fiber-optics has been shown to increase property value approximately 1% Provide a network our government could leverage to deliver data from current and future ‘smart grid’ sensors including those used for parking management, resource monitoring, air quality, muni and other needs. Over the long term smarter management could save the city money and increase our tax base without increasing taxes by reducing unemployment and creating good jobs.

Jon Humphrey
633 supporters
Update posted 21 hours ago

Petition to North carolina

Declare Independence from Meat

There are nearly 9 million pigs in North Carolina… and 10 million humans. There are a dozen counties in in the state where pigs actually outnumber humans, but most of these animals live their short lives in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). They are rarely if ever seen by the general public.  However, to our neighbors in eastern North Carolina, the reality of factory farming is anything but hidden — the smell, the flies, the foul brown water all seep through the land they call home. This isn't just an animal rights issue, it's a human rights issue, too. It’s social injustice, plain and simple. One could argue that North Carolina is a microcosm of the ills of factory farming; what's bad for the animals is bad for public health and for the environment.  Our neighbors (humans and other animals) deserve freedom from harm. Reducing demand for meat is a small but truly significant and compassionate action we can take to ensure that justice rules.  The good news is that community activists are beginning to motivate their neighbors to take action. Will you join them?  It’s time to meet the neighbors; to see the big picture and act in concert with core values related to compassion, environmental stewardship, and social justice.  Sign this pledge to show that you are among those choosing more compassionate choices and eating plants instead of animals. Do it for yourself, do it for the animals, and do it for our North Carolina neighbors who deserve better!

Farm Sanctuary
1,451 supporters
Update posted 5 days ago

Petition to Deborah Kafoury, Sharon Meieran, Loretta Smith, Jessica Vega Pederson, Lori Stegman

In solitary confinement for over a year, a family Shepherd is denied his last days at home

                                      STOP THE CRUELTY:   A Senior German Shepherd, in failing health, held in solitary   confinement for over 530 days by Multnomah County Animal   Control, Troutdale Oregon, has been prohibited from spending   his last days at home.  The pictures of Chucky with his family are from happier times.   Chucky, an old German Shepherd, has been held in solitary confinement since his impoundment on February 28, 2016 by Multnomah County Animal Services, Oregon. For over 530 days he has been denied critical socialization and exercise, allowed only rare restricted family visits by appointment for a maximum 15 minutes. Animal Control sees visitations as disruptive and justifies limited visitations, often allowed only through the kennel door, as “upsetting” to the animal. On July 5, 2017 of his long confinement, a medical report noted troubling significant health concerns: a suspicious mass that could be neoplasia, infection or another serious problem. In response MCAS has withheld diagnostic medical procedures critically needed to determine what is wrong.  Despite the gravity of his condition, Animal Control won’t release him to go home to his family as his mental and physical health decline. How did Chucky arrive at this crossroads?    Chucky and his companion Shepherd named Katrina were picked up after escaping a county approved kennel required after previous at-large episodes. Despite its approval by the county,  the kennel proved to be inadequate.  Both dogs escaped.  Chucky was charged with killing a small poodle while at large.  Although Chucky is a very personal and loving  dog with Katrina, his companion Shepherd, his family and others, he can be dog aggressive.   Multnomah County’s rejection of humane solutions is inexcusable, part of an attitude of forced compulsion, a requirement for “submission and “obedience” at all costs. Without sacrificing public safety and at no expense to taxpayers, funding for a secure kennel would have sufficed allowing Chucky to go home to his family instead of suffer. Instead the county’s refusal has now cost taxpayers nearly $8,000.  Animal Control’s intransigent position is symptomatic of government sponsored animal cruelty. And while the cost continues to escalate daily, a secure kennel remains as a practical and humane solution. Chucky comes from an impoverished Hispanic family. Although they are poor, they did their best to respect Multnomah County Animal Control’s ordinances. They should not be punished for their poverty In allowing the family to regain custody of the dog they love, MCAS would affirm its “Equity and Empowerment Lens” mandated by the county itself. But it still refuses. Once MCAS rejected all humane options, Chucky’s conviction was appealed by the family with the help of a pro bono attorney. The case remains pending before the Oregon Court of Appeals.  The appeal is viewed as an affront to the county’s authority.  The County’s attorney, MCAS advisor David Blankfeld, and MCAS director Jackie Rose have labeled the appeal frivolous and unnecessary and continue to pressure the family to give up. The appeals are all that have kept Chucky alive. But without the appeal, Chucky would certainly have been killed.  The County has taken a stand neither providing Chucky necessary diagnostic procedures nor allowing him to return to his family for needed medical treatment. Multnomah County Animal Control’s predatory behavior towards vulnerable persons is long standing. MCAS targets the most vulnerable and underserved populations in Multnomah County.   Few can afford to defend themselves and their animals against a system intended to thwart due process, justice and fair play. The poor, minorities, and in particular the homeless are fair game in a system that is rigged against them.. While Chucky’s appeal remains pending he is being held under conditions that no prison system would tolerate for even the most hardened criminals.  The County’s own notes make those conditions clear, the same observations repeated over and over and over again make his deterioration clear: “Chucky’s kennel was filthy this morning, He is spreading feces and urine all over his inside and outside areas. This includes walls, bedding, and chain link…”  Multnomah County is sending a clear message---  do not exercise your rights. Disagree and punishment will be swift. If one does appeal, animals  will be kept confined month after month  with no relief for their misery and loneliness as the County declines all effective alternatives. Chucky is not alone. Dogs like Chucky live out their lives isolated, alone, in miserable circumstances, housed in “security kennels”. The offenses are almost always correctable, almost always related to poverty. The animals suffer, become ill and injured from the effects of confinement. By refusing the diagnostic tests needed for treatment and not allowing Chucky to go home for treatment or, most likely, a few weeks of comfort, it plans to run the clock out on his life.   If we cannot prevail, Chucky will languish until his death. Ask the Multnomah County Commission to release Chucky back to his family home for the remaining days of his life. Protest the continuing abusive enforcement animal policies practiced in Multnomah County.   Without your voice, change will not happen. Nothing will change.  Gail O’Connell-Babcock, PhD   Citizens for Humane Animal Legislation/Watchdog Sherwood OR 97140 

Gail O'Connell
1,791 supporters
Update posted 6 days ago

Petition to Chris Sununu

URGENT! New Hampshire Needs a LGBTQ & Allies Resource Hub (One Stop Shop for Our Needs)

Out of the Box Hub Will you sign a petition in support of a new LGBTQ sanctuary? New Hampshire is very beautiful, but it is also one of the states that lacks a LGBTQ Resource Hub (or Center). Out of the BOX Hub http://outoftheboxhub.com/  Whether you’re looking for services and support, searching for LGBT-friendly businesses, are a professional seeking opportunities or training, or looking to take part in fun social activities with the LGBTQ community and its allies, the Hub will exist for ALL of us.  It will be a vast array of resources that complement our core service areas—Recovery, Wellness, Family and Youth—so that you can seek additional support and connection when and where you need it.  In addition to the above, The Hub (or Center) will provide vital programs and services to support our evolving LGBT community such as drug rehabilitation, counseling, HIV/Aids support services, a medical center, library, theater, support groups, event planning, and more.  In order to make our vision a reality, Out of the BOX Hub needs financial, emotional, and physical support.  If you identify as LGBTQ or are an ally, please SIGN THIS PETITION and show other NH residents that you believe the Hub can provide a safe place where people of the LGBTQ community can get together with allies and have their needs met with respect and decency.  Your generosity will help contribute to this cause.  WILL YOU SIGN?  Out of the BOX HubJazmynne Young, Executive Director188 N. Main Street Ste 1 #4Concord, NH 03301Office 347-687-4295Cell 562-826-2900https://www.facebook.com/groups/LGBTQNewHampshire/  "BECOME THE CHANGE, YOU WANT TO SEE"      

Out of the BOX Hub
101 supporters