Topic

rape

76 petitions

Update posted 1 week ago

Petition to The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, Donelle Dadigan, Patty Brunton, Cindy Braun, Christine Derenthal

Remove Bill Cosby Star NOW from The Hollywood Walk of Fame

  Bill Cosby is a brilliant stand-up comedian, actor, musician, author and community activist. Now, he is also a convicted sex offender. SIGN MY PETITION TO REMOVE BILL COSBY'S STAR FROM THE HOLLYWOOD WALK OF  FAME.  After years of whispers and rumors, Cosby was found guilty of three counts of sexual assault in April 26, 2018.  The case involved Temple University employee Andrea Constand, who said Cosby drugged and molested her at his Philadelphia home in 2004.  At the trial, five other women told about similar encounters.  OUTSIDE COURT, MORE THAN  **60 OTHER WOMEN ** HAVE COME FORWARD with stories that are much the same, but include rape.  SOME of the victims were minors when they were assaulted.  MANY of their horrific encounters took place decades ago.   This is a bitter pill to swallow for the millions of fans--including myself--who adored Bill Cosby. First, there were his terrific comedy albums, and then he was Scotty, the uber-cool agent on "I, Spy."  Later, Cosby was high school coach Chet Kincaid and a happy-go-lucky spokesperson for Jell-O Pudding Pops.  For many, he was also the wise and funny Cliff Huxtable on "The Cosby Show," a loving family man and The All American Dad.  BUT, the real Bill Cosby hid behind every one of these characters.   In reality, Cosby was a cunning sexual predator and serial rapist, serving up alcohol and pills to unsuspecting women and then assaulting them.   NOW, it's TIME for The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce to DO THE RIGHT THING.  SIGN MY PETITION TO REMOVE BILL COSBY'S STAR FROM THE HOLLYWOOD WALK OF  FAME.  In the past, the Chamber has said it will not remove stars for "alleged misconduct."  However, the guilty verdict had not yet been announced when this statement was issued. Rescinding an honor from Cosby is also not without precedent.  In a one-two punch in early May, Bill Cosby’s name and statue were removed from the prestigious Television Academy Hall of Fame AND the American Advertising Federation Hall of Fame.    ALSO, **Over 20 colleges and universities across the United States have revoked honorary degrees from Cosby,** including Yale University, an action the college has never taken in its 300 year history.  Other schools are Temple University, Johns Hopkins University, Notre Dame and Boston College.  When the verdict was announced, Cosby shouted expletives in the courtroom.  Unlike others who have apologized and taken responsibility for their reprehensible behavior, Cosby continues to say he has done nothing wrong.  To keep the Bill Cosby star on The Hollywood Walk of Fame is to agree with Bill Cosby.  For the sake of millions of tourists who visit the Walk of Fame every year--especially families with young children--NOW is the time to remove Bill Cosby's star. Together, we can encourage The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce to do the right thing.  REMOVE BILL COSBY'S STAR.   THANK YOU.                    

Hilary Grant
249 supporters
Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to Netflix

Cancel 13 Reasons Why

13 Reasons Why has caused so much controversy within the past year, and for good reason. This show is violent, triggering and simply uncalled for. Its message gets lost in translation and only brings harm more than it brings awareness. Last March when the initial season of 13 Reasons Why was released, I was anxious to watch it. I enjoyed the book in middle school because I related to it. In middle school I dealt with suicidal thoughts and actions and was looking for an outlet to be a martyr. In the first season, the biggest thing that stood out were the two rape scenes and the graphic depiction of the suicide scene. The entire premise of the show was to release reasons for suicide of the late Hannah Baker. All these reasons did was make at-risk people question their stability. I know that I personally started questioning whether I should live or not. I know that I have seen other people share the same remarks. The depictions of violence in the show were too graphic and uncalled for. In the second season, one of the characters is raped with a broom by a fellow classmate. There are many more examples and all of these examples could be fleshed out and explained even more but those of you signing this petition have probably already heard of all of the violence that takes place within this problematic show. I was okay with having the first season because, despite its terrifyingly unsafe message, it would be over. It finished nicely. All the second season is for causing more problems and making more money. It has lost its narrative and its purpose. You can't even claim that this is still about suicide awareness because it isn't anymore. This petition exist to accomplish two things. The first one and the one that needs to happen the most, is to have 13 Reasons Why cancelled. Second and optional goal is to have 13 Reasons Why taken off of Netflix entirely. I hope that we can at least get 13 Reasons Why cancelled. Please sign this petition and send it to your friends and people that you know who would be interested in this. Thank you so much.

Arin M.
1,961 supporters
Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to Mark Emmert, L. Jay Lemons, NCAA

Dear NCAA: My Mom Is a Rape Survivor and You Can Help

My mother and I are asking the NCAA to ban violent athletes. Please read my letter and sign our petition. Let the NCAA know that sports are NOT more important than human lives! Dear NCAA, My name is Darius Adams. I’m the son of Brenda Tracy who is a public rape survivor. It was 2010 when my mom first told me that she was raped. I was 17. We were sitting in our car in our driveway. I remember it because it was a life-changing moment for me. She didn’t tell me because she wanted to. She told me because she had to. She was trying to save my life. I was out of control at the time. I was angry and broken and I didn’t care if I lived or not. I remember her crying and struggling to get the words out “I was raped.” She apologized to me over and over and asked me not to hate her. “Please don’t be ashamed of me. I’m sorry. I’m so sorry.” I still can’t understand why she was apologizing to me, but after that talk, I started to see her as a different person. I saw her as someone who had been hurt, and she was just doing the best she could as a single mother with two kids. It was then that I began to turn my life around — mostly for myself, but also for my mom. I wanted her to be proud of me. I wanted to make sure that what she went through and all the sacrifices she made for me and my brother were not in vain. It was 2014 when my mother went public with her story. I wasn’t prepared. She hadn’t told me the details in 2010, but now every ugly detail was on the internet in an article by John Canzano at the Oregonian. To this day, I haven’t read it all. I can’t. I just can’t. What I do know is that my mom was drugged and gang-raped by four football players in 1998. I know that Oregon State University gave two of them 25 hours community service and Coach Mike Riley gave them a one-game suspension. I know that the police threw away her rape kit and the DA lied to her about her case. I know that Oregon State cared more about football and money than my mom. I know that my mom wanted to kill herself, and I know that she almost did. And all because other people decided that football, money and reputation was more important than me and my brother having a mother. I was scared when the article first came out. I didn’t know how people would react to us. Would they attack my mom? Would they say terrible things about her? Would I have to defend her? And what would I say? But a great thing happened. People reached out to us and they supported us. They expressed their love and gratitude for my mom coming forward and being brave enough to tell her story. I was proud of her. It was the first time I saw her happy. It was like a huge weight had been lifted off of her. I’ve heard her say more than one time, “I walked out of my prison of shame and silence that day,” and she did. I could see it. Ever since then my mom has worked hard to help others. She’s passed five laws in Oregon. She’s won numerous awards. We just went to Washington, DC where she received the National Service Courage Award from the United States Attorney General. She also changed a Pac 12 rule so that athletes with serious misconduct issues can’t transfer into our conference. She’s my hero. And that’s why I’m writing to you. I’m a college athlete, and I watch ESPN religiously. There’s a serious problem in sports. We don’t take sexual violence seriously enough. Seventeen years ago Coach Mike Riley suspended the men that hurt my mom for one game and just yesterday I saw the story about Baylor. Nothing has changed. Schools are still more worried about money and football than people’s lives. I’m a grown man now. I would never hurt a woman that way and I know that most men wouldn’t. Why are we protecting this small group of men? Why are we allowing them to destroy people’s lives? All of these victims have families and they get hurt too. I’m still dealing with what happened to my mom. We need to do something right now, and I think it starts with the NCAA creating a policy that bans violent athletes. Enough is enough. It’s been 17 years and nothing has changed. How many more years do we have to wait for something to happen? As the NCAA you have authority over many schools. YOU can change this. These schools have proven that they are not going to do the right thing. I believe it is your responsibility to step in. And please don’t do it for me or my mom. Do it because it’s the right thing to do. Sincerely, Darius Adams

Darius Adams
190,784 supporters
Update posted 4 weeks ago

Petition to Government of Sudan, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

Justice For Noura | Don't execute Noura for self defense against the man who raped her!

#JusticeForNoura "On Monday morning, just as we set out for our daily walk, my mother told me the story of Noura Hussein :  At 16, Noura was forcibly married off by her father. She refused, and in protest left her family home on the outskirts of Khartoum to stay with her aunt in Sinnar, a city almost 250 kilometers away. Noura lived with her relative for three years before her father called to say that the wedding was cancelled, and that she should come home. Upon her arrival, Noura found that she had been tricked, that the wedding to which she had never agreed was still happening, and shortly after was given away to her unchosen husband. According to her testimony, Noura refused to consummate the marriage, resisting him for the first four days. On the fifth, she says her husband raped her, with the help of a number of his male relatives (cousins and some people said the husband's brothers as well), pinned her down while he was raping her right before their eyes.The following day, when her husband attempted to rape her again, she stabbed him in self defence and it killed him. When she told her family, her father delivered her to the police, and then disowned her. That was in 2017. On Sunday, April 29, 2018, Noura was found guilty in court of premeditated murder, the punishment for which is death by hanging. My mother received this article about Noura on WhatsApp, a platform that has grown to be a main “news” source for Sudanese across the world.  I say “news” because much of the information shared over WhatsApp should be taken with a grain of salt, as many of the topics shared take on an exaggerated quality. But the platform does prove useful, occasionally exposing us to issues that either don’t make it on international newsdesks (nobody wants to hear about anything from Sudan that isn’t war or terrorism), or provide a look into the corners of our lives that folks (read: government/society) prefer to stay hidden. My reaction to Noura’s story should have been that of many of my compatriots, of healthy – and sometimes unhealthy – skepticism, to loosely quote @Osochil on Instagram. Except that I wasn’t blessed with the bliss of ignorance (or denial). Except that I know that Noura’s story isn’t new, that it isn’t even uncommon. Except that I personally know women who had been married off against their will, who suffered in silence at the hands of their husbands, whose families had all but abandoned them and/or who tacitly or actively supported their husbands’ (and their families’) abuse. Because the truth that we hate to admit is that the only thing that makes Noura’s story extraordinary is that she killed him. Her circumstance is a daily occurrence that the openminded and “enlightened” of us might not approve of, but will put up with because “that’s just an unfortunate part of our culture”. We will put up with it because the enduring silence of the women who suffer this fate allows our feathers to remain unruffled, it keeps our delicate sensibilities unaffected, it allows us to stay complacent. Noura’s story is extraordinary because she killed her abuser, and that is what she is being faulted for in the court of law and public opinion (and from which all of the following throughout this article are real quotes). “She should have reasoned with him”, “she should have told her family”, “she should have gone to court, she should have found another way”. The last four days have been a flood of should-haves, each one more patronizing than the last, each one ignoring the facts of her case, of her circumstance, of her culture. How could she have reasoned with a man who wasn’t reasonable enough to accept her adamant rejection of him? How could she seek refuge in her family, the same people who put her in this position in the first place? The same people who, when she *did* seek refuge, abandoned her? What other way was there for her to find? How does a 19 year old with no family support gain the access and tools needed to navigate her way through the legal system to get autonomy from her husband? And how long does that take? And how many are successful? The last four days have exposed our ignorance, our callousness, our violent misogyny. “She’s guilty, it’s his right, she can’t refuse him”, “He’s not a man for getting his cousins to help….. he should have just drugged her”, “Tf you talking about, [she’s] his wife he can f*ck her daily if he wants, Allah said that.” One news article read, “Bride Kills Husband on Their Honeymoon […] She stabbed him repeatedly after he tried to take his religious right [حقه الشرعي] from her by force.” Our society does not recognize marital rape and uses hadith (narrations) and other religious texts to justify it. Our society holds women accountable for the heinous actions of men, and then tells them to grin and bear it. “She didn’t choose to marry him, but her father chose for her, what can she do?” “Yes, he raped her, but she shouldn’t have killed him.” “Yes, he raped her, but she killed him in an inappropriate way.” (yes, that is the word-for-word quote)  Our society does not recognize a woman’s right to her body, to choice, to life. Our society does not want to come to terms with the heinous acts that it practices and values it holds. Our society thinks its ignorance is “fringe”, and hides behind the pristine image of “culture and tradition” that it has painstakingly curated. It digs its head in the sand and shows its ass to the world. “Our men don’t involve other men in rape, and not family. It’s not our culture. There must be more to the story.” To preserve this image, it will tell us to put faith in a justice system that it bashes on a daily basis. Noura was painted by the prosecution as a woman who, unprovoked, “brutally” murdered her husband in cold blood. They denied the rape. They did not provide a counter-motive. Even without cause or motive, they never questioned her mental state or theorized on what drove her to commit such a crime – and the justice system did not ask them to. It was content to cast a quick and dirty guilty verdict. Our country protects the perpetrators and demonizes the victims. It sentences a teenager to death, and gives a convicted rapist a presidential pardon (look it up)." Source : ALUCAN. — That’s when I read this blogpost that I decided to start this petition. I had to do something and not let this happen like it did for Asifa, and Zainab, two little girls that have been recently raped and killed in Pakistan. I am, too, a teenager and i could have faced the same thing as Noura if I was born in Sudan. I’m really emotional and Noura’s story touched me.. I can’t let her be executed, i can’t. Please, help me save her! On the 10th of May (The Day of Decision) the family of the deceased husband decided if they wanted her alive or not, for literally using self defence, against a man who was neither religiously and neither legally her 'husband', she never agreed to that marriage, and he raped her with the help of his cousins and brothers, what a shame, that you have to bring your male relatives to pin down a woman who refused to get married to and you have the gut to rape her, and some people have the atrocity to defend the man. This shows how patriachy and misogyny keep on ruling upon women in a horrible manner, and how Culture is killing innocent people, Islam condems forced marriage aswell as rape, the man had no rights to do this, not one single right! I bet if the man was alive they'd still probably punish Noura. This just show how women are treated so inferiorly, discriminately and with pure misogyny, and inequality and patriarchy, this just show how women are supposed to be only men's sex objects, and women are expected to be quiet baby dolls who never raise their voices, and stand up against which is wrong. "Noura is a Hero and standing up to your oppressor is not a crime. Rape is." -- @ShahdBatal Justice should be served, God is the Most Just, and indeed Justice shall be established, for everyone, every single people who've been oppressed. Let's get this petition a lot of signatures so that these can be printed, please share this petition, Noura mental's state is really serious, she was forced to get married, she was raped, her family disowned her, and reported her to the police, and now here she is, waiting for her death sentence, subhanaAllah, i urge you all my brothers and sisters in humanity, please share this petition, let's raise our voice against oppression, against injustice, against any form of injustice,whether is misogyny, whether it's about discrimination, racism, and any form of injustice that violates Human rights. Noura may have less than a month to live as from now, please help share this petition, and let's raise our voice for Noura using the hashtag " #JusticeForNoura" to get more attention! We want justice for Noura, against this injustice, and for all the rest of women living this nightmare, and we want them free. Let's show how the voice of the public matters, let's all sign against the death penalty of Noura Hussein, and let's all sign for her Justice to be established! #JusticeForNoura #HumanRights #MaritalRape #Rape #Sudan #Justice  

Zaynub AFINNIH
1,389,920 supporters