Topic

prison reform

132 petitions

Update posted 5 days ago

Petition to Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, UNITED STATES ATTORNEY GENERAL - JEFF SESSIONS, Donald Trump

NATIONAL ACTION AGAINST POLICE BRUTALITY! PROSECUTE POLICE WHO MURDER UNARMED INDIVIDUALS!

INVESTIGATIONS "CASE BY CASE" HAVE NOT AND SHALL NOT REMEDY THE PROBLEM! AS ONE IS BEING INVESTIGATED "HUNDREDS MORE" ARE MOUNTING UP! AND INDEED POLICE BRUTALITY AND MURDER HAS ESCALATED TO THE LEVEL OF NATIONAL PROPORTIONS... THOUSANDS UPON THOUSANDS ARE BEING "STOPPED & FRISKED" FOR NO REASON WHATSOEVER... THE LOSS OF LIFE THAT HAS OCCURRED AT THE HANDS OF POLICE HAS ESCALATED TO WHERE "UNARMED INDIVIDUALS" ARE BEING FIRED UPON AND KILLED... WEEKS AND MONTHS GO BY  WITH "NO EXPLANATION" FOR THESE SHOOTINGS BY THEIR DEPARTMENT! THE STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL WITHIN THESE STATES HAVE "REFUSED TO ACT" LEAVING ALL ACTION TO BE TAKEN BY THE COMMISSIONER'S OF THESE DEPARTMENTS.  THE COMMISSIONER'S HAVE "JUSTIFIED" THE ACTIONS OF THESE OFFICERS - AND IN MANY CASES "PROMOTED THEM" AFTER THE KILLING OF THESE VICTIMS. THE MECHANISMS THAT HAVE BEEN PUT IN PLACE HAVE "ALL FAILED" AND THE ESCALATION OF POLICE BRUTALITY IS "EVIDENCE" OF THAT FAILURE. WE HAVE WITNESSED THE CONFESSIONS OF POLICE THEMSELVES WHO HAVE TESTIFIED THAT THEY WERE MADE TO ISSUE SUMMONSES AND "MAKE ARRESTS WITHOUT CAUSE" AND THE SUBSEQUENT "HARASSMENT" WHICH FOLLOWED IMMEDIATELY AFTER THEIR REFUSAL... WE HAVE HEARD TESTIMONY IN COURT HOW THEY INDEED PLANTED NARCOTICS ON INNOCENT VICTIMS SIMPLY TO MEET THE QUOTA REQUIRED CONCERNING AN ARREST!! YET, THOSE INDIVIDUALS REMAIN INCARCERATED FOR THE CRIME ACCUSED!! http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/fabricated-drug-charges-innocent-people-meet-arrest-quotas-detective-testifies-article-1.963021   THE RECOURSE OF THE PEOPLE HAS BEEN THWARTED, SO THAT THERE REMAINS NO COURSE OF ACTION THAT CAN BE TAKEN! THEREFORE THIS EPIDEMIC, WHICH HAS REACHED "NATIONAL PROPORTIONS" IS BEING PRESENTED TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES FOR IMMEDIATE INVESTIGATION, ACTION AND REMEDY. AS THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES, THE OCCUPIER OF OFFICE IS THE "CHIEF LAW ENFORCER" HAVING JURISDICTION OVER BOTH STATE AND GOVERNMENT IN ISSUES CONCERNING LAW! AND WHEN VIOLATIONS OF LAW ARE RAMPANT, UN-CHECKED AND UNABATED, HE HAS A "SWORN DUTY" TO RESPOND THOSE VIOLATIONS. LAW ENFORCEMENT ACROSS THE UNITED STATES HAS "ABUSED THE AUTHORITY" VESTED IN THEM, AND HAVE VIOLATED ON A "CONTINUAL BASIS" THE LAW ITSELF!  BUT NO ACTION HAS BEEN TAKEN, EITHER BY THEIR DEPARTMENT, OR ATTORNEY GENERALS WITHIN THEIR STATE! THEREFORE, PETITION IS MADE BEFORE THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES TO NOT ONLY ACT ON BEHALF OF THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, BUT TO FULFILL THE OBLIGATIONS OF THE OFFICE - FOR WHICH HE OR SHE HAS "SWORN AN OATH" TO FULFILL UPON OCCUPANCY! LET IT BE UNDERSTOOD: THAT A "FAILURE OR REFUSAL TO ACT" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE OBLIGATIONS CONCERNING THOSE DUTIES, SIGNIFIES AN INABILITY TO HOLD THE OFFICE WHICH IS NOW BEING HELD.

Danette Chavis
85,117 supporters
Started 1 week ago

Petition to Amnesty International, Arkansas State Senate, Arkansas State House, Arkansas Governor

FREE KENNETH REAMS! He's been on death row for the past 26 years. He never killed anybody!

Kenneth Reams was sentenced to death in 1993 when he was 18 years old for a crime he did not commit. Since then he has been incarcerated on Arkansas’ death row, spending every day of the past 26 years in solitary confinement.Kenneth has pushed back the walls of his cell to become a painter, a poet, non-profit founder, and art event organizer – all while fighting for justice.WE NEED YOUR HELP TO FREE KENNETH REAMS! FREE MEN - a docu-film about his story, won several human rights awards around the world and Kenneth keeps inspiring thousand of people with his story of human resilience . Kenneth's case need more attention!  Kenneth Reams's case is a revelatory in any survey of US shameful legacy of severe and unfair punishment for African-American youth.  Kenneth is a native of Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Physical abuse, abject poverty, neglect, and lack of opportunity defined his childhood. In 1993, while still a teenager, he and a childhood friend—also a teenager—decided to commit a robbery so that his friend could have money to pay for his cap and gown for his high school graduation. They did not intend to cause any physical harm. However, during the robbery attempt, Kenneth's friend impulsively pulled the trigger. The bullet struck the victim, who died later that evening. The victim was a white man; Kenneth and his co-defendant are African-American. Even though Kenneth did not shoot or intend or attempt to harm the victim, both teens were charged with capital murder. Kenneth's friend admitted his guilt, pleaded guilty, and received a sentence of life without the possibility parole. Kenneth, who did not shoot the victim, did not want to plead guilty to a murder he did not commit and decided to contest the charges in court. Ultimately, Kenneth was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death before a nearly all-white jury. He became the youngest inmate on Arkansas' death row, despite not having pulled the trigger or taken a life. Kenneth never had a chance for a fair determination of his guilt. His defense was led by an overburdened, court-appointed, part-time public defender, who only began earnestly preparing for trial a month before its commencement. In addition to failing to challenge the discriminatory jury selection process that landed Kenneth a nearly all-white jury, his attorney failed to call the actual shooter, Kenneth’s co-defendant, as a witness, despite the fact that he had already pleaded guilty to the charges. He allowed the prosecuting attorney to claim that Kenneth was the shooter and called only Kenneth to testify as a witness in his defense during the phase of the trial determining guilt. However, years later, on appeal, Kenneth' co-defendant and other witnesses testified that Kenneth was not the shooter and that Kenneth’s attorney had never made an effort to reach out to them. Despite being sentenced to death as a teen, then housed in solitary confinement—spending twenty-three hours a day in a cell no bigger than a parking space—Kenneth found redemption from within. He found an outlet in art—using whatever materials he could find—and writing. His work began to be appear in art shows in both the States and abroad. Working with his wife, Isabelle, and outside supporters, in 2012, he founded Who Decides, Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to using art to get the public to think about capital punishment, solitary confinement, and mass incarceration. While a post-conviction judge overturned his death sentence—a decision affirmed by the Arkansas Supreme Court— he remains incarcerated for the capital murder he did not commit. He is working with organizations such as the NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund and other supporters to bring attention to his case. In the recent past, he has spoken remotely to audiences about his life and experience in the criminal justice system at a number of universities, including Princeton University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Miami School of Law, and the University of Arkansas. An award-winning documentary, titled FREE MEN, premiered recently and focuses on his case, his art and his story of human resilience; the documentary has been shown to audiences across the globe in places such as Beirut, Buenos Aires, Geneva, Islamabad, Tokyo, Italy and Vienna and many more, winning Human Rights Awards and inspiring thousand of people.  It is time for Kenneth to be freed. He faces adversity few will ever understand and possesses fortitude beyond compare. He wakes up each day in solitary confinement, fighting peacefully for his freedom. He is an advocate for redemption, equality, and the humane treatment of the incarcerated. He sees hope in the hopeless and the humanity in those society has cast away. We hope that Amnesty International will help us tell his story and finally get Kenneth the justice he deserves. CONTACT:George Kendall, Kenneth’s attorneygeorge.kendall@squirepb.com MORE INFO:www.freekennethreams.org WATCH FILM:http://bit.ly/Watch_FREEMEN

FREE KENNETH REAMS
249 supporters
Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to President Donald Trump, Kim Kardashian

Is 15 Years Enough?

Petition from my son who is in a federal prison. Hello, my name is Daniel Gallant 07627-028. I am a federal prisoner serving time for possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine and possession of a firearm. I received a 25 year sentence for my offense and have served over 15 years thus far.When I speak to people about my crimes and the amount of time I was sentenced for them, there is usually the assumption that I was violent or that I sold large amounts of drugs. Neither of these things are true. I was sentenced to a 25 year term due to mandatory minimum sentencing schemes that were passed into law in the 1980s and 1990s during which time politicians were trying to outdo one another to see whom, or which party could be the toughest on crime. By no means does this mitigate my role in this offense. I am guilty. I sold drugs and I possessed a gun. As a matter of fact, I’ve used drugs since the age of 14 and the poor decisions of my youth led to drug addiction and the criminal lifestyle that has resulted in my current incarceration. I was not a first time offender. To use drugs is to possess drugs and I have previous convictions for simple possession, including possession of marijuana (1gram) that resulted in me doing a year prison sentence in the Indiana Department of Corrections. The question I pose to you today is this, “What is an appropriate sentence for a non-violent, low-level drug offender?” Since I am a repeat drug offender due to addiction, I definitely deserved a harsher punishment than the slaps on the wrist I had received from previous infractions. Most people would agree, including myself, that I deserved to go to prison, but for how long? Is a 25 year sentence appropriate in my case or is 15 years enough to satisfy the goals of justice?Before you answer that question, I want to tell you a little bit about what I have done while I’ve been incarcerated. Keep in mind that I’ve been a drug addict since the age of 14 and that the prisons are infested with illegal drugs. Over the course of time I have received several disciplinary infractions for marijuana and have been written up for minor infractions such as sports betting and missed appointments. I have, however, made some noteworthy accomplishment as well. I have taken college courses in accounting. While employed in prison industries I worked in a business environment where I was able to apply my knowledge of accounting and learned computer applications such as Microsoft excel, word, power point and SAP. Utilizing self-study initiatives, I have learned quite a bit about investing and various financial instruments one might use to grow their money. I have learned that our country is teaming with small business opportunities and now know the basics of writing a business plan and the management skills necessary to pursue such an endeavor. I have earned my serve-save managerial certificate which is significant should I decide to pursue a career in the restaurant industry. The weight of that certificate alone carries with it a substantial increase in employability and income potential.Most importantly, I have developed a different life philosophy, one that is not dependant on chemicals for happiness, nor one that measures success by the money earned through ill gotten gains. I have recently submitted a commutation request to the President of the Untied States. I am asking him to grant me my freedom now as opposed to my current scheduled release date of 11/3/2026. Should he grant my request it will not erase my record but it will shorten my sentence. Since I will release back into society I am asking you how you feel about this? I pray that many will find it in their hearts to agree that my debit to society has been sufficiently paid and also be willing to sign this petition supporting the same.I would also like to share with you some of the details of my release plan. Upon my release I have housing, and a great career opportunity. I have a family member that is a regional director of an insurance company and he has extended to me a job offer. I will be cultivating leads to promote insurance policies and annuities . My starting income potential will be substantial making me an honest tax paying citizen. I will also continue with my drug treatment program. I am 2 years clean and intend to remain that way. This is the longest sobriety I’ve experienced in 33 years. I’m also looking into some community services that I can be active in as well. I will also be a part of the family team that is caring for my mother. She is battling stage 4 lung cancer. One of my greatest desires is to be there for her, and spend some quality time with her before her time on this earth comes to an end. This is an opportunity that I fear will not be available to me in 2026. Due to recent trends in criminal justice reform, if I were convicted of the same offense today I would receive a sentence lower than 25 years. Not only that, the laws have changed to such an extent that my criminal history is now either completely legal in some states, or a mere misdemeanor or could be resolved by paying a fine. I mentioned this because my criminal history was used to add 10 years to my sentence. Despite these changes in the laws they were not made retroactive which means that people already sentenced are stuck with the original sentences they received. Only the new cases are getting lower sentences. By law I have no grounds for relief through the courts which is why I am asking the President for Relief. It’s my only hope. Am I a threat to society? Am I a danger to your community? Do I have a propensity for violence? There is absolutely nothing in my criminal history or in my prison record to indicate that I am any danger to anyone. Using and/or selling drugs is a crime and criminal activity needs to be punished to promote respect for the law. This is something I am sure we can all agree upon, but again the question I am asking today is this, “Is 15 years in prison sufficient punishment for the crimes I’ve committed?” I am 47 years old now. Should I be forced to complete my entire sentence until 2026, along with 10 years probation, I would be 54 years old when I get out. My mother will likely have passed away by then and I would have lost 6 years of productive time in society. My prayer is that you will agree that 15 years is enough time served and will sign my petition affirming this belief thus increasing my opportunity that the President will sign my Commutation request. Thank you so muchDaniel James Gallant  

Marie Ross
242 supporters