Topic

military

175 petitions

Update posted 13 hours ago

Petition to Aaron Obrochta (Navy), United States Military, Sgt. Abianni, Navy, LT Keide Kerrick Akinola, CAPT Stuart Craig, SFC Camilo Batista, Ronnie L. Simonsen, Air Force

United States Military: Lift the Ban on Transgender People in the Military

Transgender people are banned from joining the military. Sign this petition to help get the ball rolling: https://www.change.org/petitions/united-states-military-lift-the-ban-on-transgender-people-in-the-military We need as many people as possible to support this cause in order to show the government this is an important cause. "Don't ask don't tell" isn't over yet. The military still discriminates against transgender people. Don't ask don't tell only affected sexual orientation. Gender Dysphoria is now the classification in the DSW medical book so the military has no reason to discriminate based on the fact that a mental health diagnosis can prevent transgender people from serving in the military. Unfortunately, at this time they can prevent transgender people from serving in the United Stated military. Add transgender people the the repeal of don't ask, don't tell. Let equal rights and safety for all transgender people be possible! Don't ask, don't tell needs to be repealed for all, including transgender individuals. All transgender people deserve the same rights as every other United States citizen serving the country. Be that serving openly in the military, marrying the person they love or just walking down the street without risking being beaten or killed just because we live our lives differently than thinks is the "proper" way.Here are some articles about it: The New DADT: The Military's Ban on Transgender Service: http://outservemag.com/2012/01/the-new-dadt-the-militarys-ban-on-transgender-service/ and http://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive/2012/10/for-transgendered-soldiers-dont-ask-dont-tell-carries-on/264225/ About one in 11,000 male babies and one in 30,000 female babies are born with Dysphoria. There are approximately 700,000 Transgender adults in the U.S., and about 15,450 service members who identify as transgender — 8,800 active, 6,650 in the National Guard and reserves, and 134,350 veterans. About 20% of the roughly 700,000 Transgender people in the United States have been a part of the military at some point in time. Transgender folks have served in every conflict in our nation’s history. One in five Transgender adults have served in the Armed Forces. Nearly one in ten Transgender Veterans report having been discharged due to their gender identity. Transgender people make up 0.6% of the 21.8 million U.S. Veterans; roughly 1 in 200. As of December 2013, being Transgender in the U.S. military is considered a psychological disorder and is grounds for dishonorable discharge. In 2013, the Veterans Affairs Department treated 2,567 Veterans with the diagnosis of gender dysphora with transgender-specific care, according to Ndidi Mojay, a V.A. spokeswoman. In sharp contrast, while Transgender people are prohibited from serving openly in the United States, thirteen foreign countries allow open transgender military service, in some capacity. These countries are: Australia Brazil Belgium Canada Czech Republic Israel Netherlands New Zealand Spain Sweden Thailand United Kingdom Uruguay There are hundreds of reports and statistics from our allies in which transgender service has had no impact; very similar to our own experiences with the repeal of DADT. http://defglis.com.au/guides/GenderTransition.pdfwww.hrc.org/documents/HRC-Workplace-Gender-Transition-Guidelines.pdfwww.wpath.orgwww.wipeouttransphobia.com/myth-buster/My dad always dreamed of me joining the Coast Guard. As a kid, like passing by, he'd be like "That’s the Coast Guard. They pay for school and its fun." So, it stuck. Passing by the Coast Guard with my dad was just as important as going to a nature walk with him, because he was concerned about my future, and those times I’ll never forget. Please sign the petition to help his dream and mine for other transgender people come true. This is why we need to change this regulation. www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/for-transgender-service-members-concept-of-dont-ask-dont-tell-remains-a-reality/2014/04/26/c0597936-ccb6-11e3-93eb-6c0037dde2ad_story.html

Jason Bartlett
4,613 supporters
Update posted 1 day ago

Petition to USAA

Demand USAA honor expected paychecks for Coast Guard members during the shutdown

Coast Guard families are going without paychecks during the government shutdown. In the past, military banks would step in and honor expected paychecks - that isn’t happening this time. USAA is one of the largest military-serving banks. During past shutdowns, USAA would offer zero interest loans in place of expected paychecks for military members. Instead, USAA is telling Coast Guard families they should apply for low interest personal loans that require high credit scores. Many Coast Guard families are unable to get these loans, even with great credit in the 700-750 range. Meanwhile, Navy Federal is offering Coast Guard members interest free loans that coincide with expected paychecks. Coast Guard members shouldn’t be singled out. Tell USAA to stand up for all service members and honor shutdown paychecks. In past shutdowns, all branches of the military would be affected. But unlike other branches of the military, the Coast Guard falls under the umbrella of the Department of Homeland Security. The Department of Homeland Security is not being funded during the shutdown. Servicemembers shouldn’t have to choose between paying their bills and putting food on their tables. Tell USAA to honor expected Coast Guard paychecks during the shutdown. No one knows how long the shutdown will last. Coast Guard families may have to go without paychecks for months. Tell USAA to honor expected paychecks and help Coast Guard families during the shutdown.

Campaigns Lab
283 supporters
Update posted 4 days ago

Petition to Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Jeff Flake, John McCain, Donald Trump, Tulsi Gabbard, Raul M. Grijalva, Beto O'Rourke, Mike Coffman, Earl Blumenauer, Walter B. Jones, Lindsey Graham, Dave Joyce, Carlos Curbelo, Ryan Costello, John H. Rutherford, Ruben Gallego, Tom O'Halleran, Kyrsten Sinema, Andy Biggs, Paul A. Gosar

Fight For Those Who Fought For You

A Call to Reason As Veterans of the United States Armed Forces we call on the Veterans Health Administration (V.H.A.) to fully recognize cannabis as a viable treatment option, which is a far less toxic alternative to commonly prescribed pharmaceuticals. Leaders are increasingly aware of the devastation to former military members (and their families) caused by inappropriate prescription of opiates, SSRIs, Benzodiazepines, and other pharmaceuticals. In 2011 the V.H.A. established internal policy officially outlining their position on cannabis, allowing physicians in “legal” states to discuss its use with their patients, at their own discretion. Multiple attempts have been made to resolve the inability of veterans to incorporate cannabis into their official treatment plans. Each and every one of these attempts have been sabotaged. The V.H.A. needs to take action on this issue. Federal leadership in the Executive and Legislative branches of our government need to understand the enormity of this pharmaceutical impact and available remedy. The fact is, veterans are self-medicating with cannabis. Most turn to cannabis after pharmaceutical options, some of which include warnings of suicidal ideation, fail. This situation is untenable. Because the V.H.A. is a federal program, operating in all fifty states, veterans are federal patients and require equal medical treatment/access to cannabis, regardless of state laws. Accordingly, an expansion of existing V.H.A. policy which would meet our needs is in order. The status quo is medically unethical. We request and require: Unobstructed ability to engage in open and honest dialogue with our V.H.A. Primary Care Teams about our use of cannabis, where we can then develop proper treatment plans, documenting our experiences. The ability to participate in research programs conducted by V.H.A., which would further assist us in our understanding of medical cannabis, and how to best introduce it into our treatment regimen. The ability to receive recommendations for cannabis from our V.H.A. Doctors, should that be the agreed upon treatment plan. Prescriptions from the V.H.A. filled at local dispensaries, or where dispensaries are not located/permitted, getting those scripts filled at the V.H.A. Pharmacy. A cannabis farm at every major V.H.A. healthcare facility designed to teach veterans about their medication, how to grow it, and to supply the hospital Pharmacy. This discussion, this reform, is long overdue. Join us.      

1620 Legion
147,588 supporters
Update posted 5 days ago

Petition to U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, Johnny Isakson, VA Secretary Robert Wilkie, Mitch McConnell

Give the Vietnam Blue Water Navy Veterans their presumptive rights.

In 1977, the first claims of Agent Orange exposure came flooding into the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). But it took 14 years for Congress to actually listen, take action and give our Vietnam veterans the benefits they deserved. The Agent Orange Act of 1991 was implemented to provide much-needed care to veterans who were exposed to the harmful chemical cocktail Agent Orange. Many of us thought the fight to get the medical attention we deserved was over, but that wasn’t the case. In 2002, the VA amended its initial plan and excluded thousands of “Blue Water” Navy vets -- vets who served right off the coast -- from receiving  our rightful benefits. Because we hadn’t served on land, the VA tried to say we were unlikely to suffer the effects of Agent Orange poisoning. Even though we didn’t serve on Vietnamese soil, we were still exposed to Agent Orange. In fact, a 2011 study by the National Institute of Medicine found that Blue Water veterans could have been exposed in multiple ways, including via the ships’ water distillation system and through the air. The National Institute of Medicine also stated, “Given the available evidence, the committee recommends that members of the Blue Water Navy should not be excluded from the set of Vietnam-era veterans with presumed herbicide exposure.” We are asking for your help in urging Congress to pass legislation (House Bill H 299 and Senate Bill S 422)  that will reinstate our right as Vietnam Navy veterans to receive the benefits we deserve for being exposed to this terrible chemical. Nearly 90,000 Blue Water vets are depending on you. We are dealing with serious health issues that range from cancer to diabetes, and from Parkinson’s to heart disease. Many of these diseases have made it nearly impossible for some of us to get steady work. Last year, the VA finally extended benefits to Air Force crew members who flew in C-123s after they had been used in Vietnam to spray the toxic cocktail. The VA came to the realization that even the slightest exposure to this chemical had serious effects on a soldier's health. So why are the Navy vets’ pleas being ignored? We breathed the Agent Orange-polluted air that drifted from the coast and drank water sprinkled with the herbicide, and now our bodies are paying the cost. We ask you to stand with us, and with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and Rep. David Valadao, and demand that the VA assume responsibility for the effects of Agent Orange on Blue Water vets. Please sign our petition asking Congress to pass House Bill HR 299 and Senate Bill S 422 and give us our benefits. 

The Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Association
92,536 supporters