Topic

military

194 petitions

Update posted 24 hours ago

Petition to Donald J. Trump, U.S. House of Representatives

Let DoD personnel defend themselves on base.

Since the implementation of Regulation 90-114 in 1993, military personnel have been restricted in their ability to carry firearms on government property and in federal facilities. The justification of such action has historically been the belief that military bases feature robust security and trustworthy employees. The following is a non-exhaustive list of the failures of those assumptions leading to active shooter and related incidents on military bases located in the United States since 1993. 1993 - Fort Knox (3 Patriots lost) 1994 - Fairchild AFB (4 Patriots lost) 1995 - Arlington Virginia (2 Patriots wounded) 1995 - Fort Bragg (1 Patriot lost) 2009 - Fort Hood (13 Patriots lost) 2011 - Fort Hood (planned bombing thwarted) 2013 - Quantico Virginia (2 Patriots lost) 2013 - Washington Navy Yard (12 Patriots lost) 2014 - Fort Hood (3 Patriots killed) 2015 - Chattanooga Tennessee (4 Patriots lost) 2016 - Lackland AFB (2 Patriots lost) 2019 - NAS Oceana (1 Patriot lost) 2019 - Pearl Harbor (2 Patriots lost) 2019 - NAS Pensacola (3 Patriots lost) That tally includes 52 Patriots killed or wounded by terrorists, disgruntled service members, or civilian employees on a base or post that doesn't include overseas bases or federal buildings such as court houses, jails, schools, on-base housing, post offices, airports, National Parks, BLM buildings, IRS buildings, and so on.  It would be unfair to say all of those Patriots would be with us today had personnel been allowed to carry firearms for personal defense, but at least one life could have been saved at an incredibly minimal risk level. The Citizens of the United States have, through the Constitution and the US Code via the Oath of Office, entrusted members of the United States Armed Forces with the defense of the country and all we hold dear. The fact that those same service members can obtain a permit to carry a concealed weapon in each state they happen to get stationed in, but can't carry that same firearm in the most highly targeted location in that state - the military base - flies in the face of that trust and is contrary to good sense. This petition, and your signature, is designed to drive legislation leading to the establishment of an open and concealed carry permit that is extended to Department of Defense civilian and military personnel, is NOT subject to the discretion of lower levels of command, includes reciprocity in all 50 US states and it's territories, and permits concealed carry in all federal facilities regardless of duty status. Thank you for your consideration and support and please consider sharing!  http://chng.it/m8mPPyL4    

David Ritchey
2,500 supporters
Update posted 5 days ago

Petition to U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, President of the United States

Afghan & Iraqi Translators Saved American Lives. Tell Congress to Recognize them as Heroes

While serving in the US Army in 2008, my Afghan interpreter Janis Shinwari saved my life. During an intense firefight, Janis killed two Taliban fighters that had snuck up behind me. Without Janis, they would have killed me. In Iraq and Afghanistan, translators serve alongside the US military and are essential to keeping us safe and helping us do our mission. And they do so at the risk of being targeted by the Taliban, including their families. Janis is not the exception. There are many translators who have saved American lives on the battlefield. Like Fred, who saved 25 members of the Pennsylvania National Guard.Supporters had to crowdfund the money to fly him and his family to the US before the Taliban killed him. After serving, Steeler's Offensive Tackle and Army Ranger Alejandro Villaneuva worked hard to get his Afghan translator here. After serving alongside our military, many translators received SIV’s or Special Immigrant Visas, so they could relocated to the United States. Unfortunately, they are not considered veterans. We are asking Congress to honor its promise to our wartime allies. We want them to be treated as the heroes they are when they finally come here after years of screening by the State Department, Defense Department, and Department of Homeland Security. All we are asking is for Congress to name them heroes so that they can check the veteran's preference box on job applications and 56,000 veteran focused charities to include them in their missions. Many are standing by. We are not asking for VA benefits. This is an innovative idea that comes at no cost to the taxpayer and requires no new regulations.  Best of all, we have bipartisan support!  Yes, people in D.C. can agree on the same thing. This is a simple wording issue. These charities can't help Special Immigrant Visa recipients because technically they are "non-veterans."  Ask me if I think my translator is a veteran.  Ask the guys from the Pennsylvania National Guard who spent their own money to fly their translator here if he is a veteran.  Ask Alejandro.   Since at least World War 2, the United States has a very checkered history of honoring our promises to our wartime allies. Yes, big alliances like NATO matter, but it is the friendships and trust at the individual level that is our greatest diplomatic tool. The world knows that we didn't fully take care of the Filipino soldiers that helped us in World War 2, the Koreans during the Korean War, the Vietnamese during the Vietnam War, and now the brave men and women from Afghanistan and Iraq who risked everything to stand shoulder to shoulder with us. With your help, we can change this. We need your voice to get this to the Senate floor. It's time the American people demand our representatives to stand shoulder to shoulder with those that saved American lives. I have a family today because of my translator.

No One Left Behind
117,457 supporters