Topic

Masks

60 petitions

Update posted 10 hours ago

Petition to Public Health Officer of San Mateo County

Save lives. Clarity Needed: Facial Covering Order in San Mateo County

"Use facial coverings extensively" is advice that Dr. Scott Morrow, Public Health Officer of San Mateo County, frequently states.  But the actual health mandate, San Mateo County Public Health Order No c19-11, falls short in providing essential clarity for the public to easily understand and comply with the advice. People are confused. The nebulous nature of the order, which combines recommendations that aren't actual mandates with requirements that must be followed, leaves residents attempting to interpret how the community should behave when it comes to facial coverings. In bordering San Francisco county, there is clarity. Mask wearing is nearly universal with residents walking the streets in facial coverings. San Francisco compliance can be attributed to a clear county order that mandates facial coverings in fluid situations where distances between people change frequently. San Francisco Order No c19-12c states, "A Face Covering must always be worn in fluid situations where distances between people change frequently such as a busy sidewalk or popular outdoor area where it is impractical or impossible to maintain six feet of distance at all times." The order goes on to state that, "In other situations where maintaining constant social distancing is more practical, such as walking on an uncrowded sidewalk or trail, a person must ensure that their Face Covering is in place before they are within six feet of anyone outside of their household or living unit. For clarity, if two people are walking towards each other on a sidewalk, they must begin donning their Face Covering early enough so that all faces are covered before they come within six feet of each other (for example, at normal walking speeds, people should begin donning their Face Covering when they are about 30 feet, or two car lengths, away from each other)." The SF.gov website explains, "You must have a face covering on when you pass someone while walking or running outside." The San Mateo County order lacks the clarity of the San Francisco order, particularly when it comes to fluid situations. It also does not clarify anywhere that people should begin putting on their face coverings when they are about 30 feet away to ensure everyone will be covered when six feet away.  The lack of clarity shows up in confusion, anxiety, and finger-pointing amongst residents who are trying to make sense of what is required vs. what is suggested with different interpretations of the order. This confusion and anxiety repeatedly show up in many posts begging for clarity in the community site, NextDoor.  Most people want to do the right thing. We need our leadership to provide clarity so that our community does the right thing. Mere suggestions or recommendations are not enough. If Dr. Scott Morrow believes extensive facial coverings are necessary, it should be reflected in his public health order, with precision.   Specifically, the order should clarify that "A Face Covering must always be worn in fluid situations where distances between people change frequently such as a busy sidewalk or popular outdoor area where it is impractical or impossible to maintain six feet of distance at all times." And, "a person must ensure that their Face Covering is in place before they are within six feet of anyone outside of their household or living unit. For clarity, if two people are walking towards each other on a sidewalk, they must begin donning their Face Covering early enough so that all faces are covered before they come within six feet of each other (for example, at normal walking speeds, people should begin donning their Face Covering when they are about 30 feet, or two car lengths, away from each other)."

Caren Cioffi
138 supporters
Update posted 11 hours ago

Petition to Shoreland Lutheran High School, Paul Scriver, Micheal Koestler, Paul Strutz

Allow Mask Variety at Shoreland

         This year, masks have become an important tool for creating a safe educational environment. Masks come in a variety of colors and patterns, and have become forms of personal expression. However, Shoreland, without giving a reason as to why, has banned all masks without solid colors or the Shoreland logo. This puts strain on students who have to obtain masks, adds more risk of masks not being washed, and also dampens the spirits of the student body.          Limiting what masks can be worn leaves students who have already amassed masks stranded with the state provided ones. It also forces students who have limited resources for obtaining masks to use these state provided ones. However, are a couple state provided masks enough?           The CDC recommends that reusable masks be washed after each use- so if a student had two state provided masks, this means they would have to wash them every two days. How many high school students do laundry every two days? Not that many. By limiting the masks students can use to solid colors or Shoreland logos, this increases the likelihood students will rewear a dirtied mask, putting our safety at risk.           Furthermore, this limit on masks puts a dampen on already low spirits. This pandemic is a troublesome time, and the stress of going back to school during this time is high. One thing that helps alleviate this stress, in a way, is the expression that can be shown through masks. Wearing a mask with kittens or pizza on it creates some much needed levity during these times, where a plain black or white mask does not.            Finally, there is a simple solution to this new “dress code”— the old one. Instead of forcing students to comply to a dress code that will cause stress, unnecessary difficulty, and potential risk, the school could utilize the same dress code used for graphic tees, but regarding masks. For example, no masks containing band logos, or vulgar language or imagery. Wearing masks may be mandatory- but this new dress code doesn’t have to be. How to Wash a Cloth Face Covering. (2020, May 22). Retrieved August 06, 2020, from https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-to-wash-cloth-face-coverings.html

Emily Rouse
162 supporters