Topic

lularoe

3 petitions

Update posted 3 weeks ago

Petition to Xavier Becerra, California Governor, DeAnne Stidham, Mark Stidham

LuLaRoe honor 100% refund to those who have started the cancellation process

In April 2017, LuLaRoe announced it would give 100% money back plus free shipping for a retailer who was wishing to end being a retailer with them. Since that time, they have drug their feet with the return process, leaving many retailers in the dark and waiting for shipping labels. Today, September 13, 2017, LuLaRoe announced they will now be 90% net money PLUS pay for our own shipping, plus all items must be in the original packaging it was received in. LuLaRoe reiterated many times we did not need the packaging. They have also said if you are in the process of going out of business but did not receive shipping labels from LuLaRoe, this new rule applies to you. Per their own Policies and Procedures, they must give 30-day notice before any policy changes.   We are demanding LuLaRoe grandfather in anyone in the current cancellation process, as well as expedite anyone who has been waiting over 30 days for their refund check.    "Upon receipt of the Resalable products and sales aids, the Independent Fashion Retailer will be reimbursed 90% of the net cost of the original purchase price(s). Shipping and handling charges incurred by an Independent Fashion Retailer when the products or sales aids were purchased, and return shipping fees, will not be refunded. If the purchases were made through a credit card, the refund will be credited back to the same account. If an Independent Fashion Retailer was paid a bonus based on a product(s) that he or she purchased, and such product(s) is subsequently returned for a refund, the bonus that was paid to the Independent Fashion Retailer based on that product purchase will be deducted from the amount of the refund. Products and sales aids shall be deemed “Resalable” if each of the following elements is satisfied: 1) they are unworn, unwashed, folded with hang tags and in original packaging; 2) packaging and labeling has not been altered or damaged; 3) they are in a condition such that it is a commercially reasonable practice within the trade to sell the merchandise at full price; and 4) they are returned to LLR within one year from the date of purchase. Any merchandise that is clearly identified at the time of sale as non-returnable, discontinued, or as a seasonal item, shall not be Resalable. Items that are returned that are not Resalable will be donated to a charity selected by LuLaRoe and no refund or exchange will be issued.” Please note the following key elements of the policy: Only product purchased by the Retailer from LuLaRoe may be returned.Product must be in resalable condition.*This is only for product purchased within the past 12 months. Resalable product will be reimbursed at 90% of the original wholesale purchase price.Shipping and handling will be paid by the Retailer. If you have any TEAM members with questions on how we will continue to administer this policy, please note the following: 1. If you have received an email confirmation from LuLaRoe of a refund amount due to you, you will receive those funds as noted. 2. If you have received valid return shipping labels from LuLaRoe, we will honor the 100% refund and free shipping waivers that have previously been extended. All other terms and conditions as stated in the Policies and Procedures will apply. Please note: refunds will be issued for resalable items only. 3. If you’ve not received valid return shipping labels, you will no longer be eligible for free shipping or a 100% refund on resalable products. For those in this category, regardless of where you are at in the process of cancellation, you will be subject to all of the terms and conditions of provision 3.16.3 of the current Policies and Procedures."

Alana Taglieri
12,348 supporters
Started 2 months ago

Petition to LulaRoe

#FirePatrick: LuLaRoe Needs a New Head Designer

LuLaRoe is a wildly popular, incredibly funky direct sales clothing line that is known for its "buttery" soft leggings and wide range of inclusive sizes. Over 91,000 men and women have invested over $5,000 in this business!  The company saw tremendous growth surrounding the notion that only 5,000 items in the entire company would carry each individual print--meaning that each print is exclusive. However, prints featuring mosaic bears, colorful puzzle pieces, and lions wearing glasses and a beanie were purchased swiftly, leaving consultants stuck with inventory covered in triangles (also known as Doritos), vulva shaped objects, and hideous squiggles that the majority of retailers cannot sell even at a discount. Naturally, these incredibly popular prints were few and far between leaving many consultants with thousands of dollars in unsold inventory.  LuLaRoe has touted their "LuLaRoe Pro" as none other than Patrick Winget, a designer whose fashion experience comes from Kohls, Walmart, and Hot Topic. He claims to know what people want, and designs accordingly. As it turns out, he is very wrong.  This petition calls for the firing of Patrick Winget from the LuLaroe design team, in favor of a designer actually well versed in fashion and current trends. Oddly shaped geometric prints weirdly blended with outdated florals should not be on clothing in the 21st century. Tribal print pastels should be illegal, and look good on no one. Subtle prints are beautiful too. If all the prints were beautiful, consultants wouldn't be going out of business left and right. There is no reason why every print can't be amazing.  Whether you are a LuLaRoe consultant or a LuLaRoe customer, we are all in agreement that LuLaRoe needs a major design overhaul. Sign this petition, so we can let LuLaRoe know how we feel! If you have been personally victimized by Patrick's terrible designs, share your story with your signature. Solidarity, friends.

Mary Smith
276 supporters
Started 10 months ago

Petition to DeAnne Stidham, Mr. Mark Stidham, Mr. Terrel Transtrum

Eliminate Culturally Appropriated and Racist Prints from LuLaRoe

As a plus-size woman, who has struggled constantly with her weight, LuLaRoe clothing has finally made me feel good in my own skin. I'm not the only one. Everyone I know who has tried LLR feels the same. And my consultant friends *actually* make great money. Talk about a win-win-win! That's why I am brokenhearted to say that I will no longer be purchasing any LLR clothes until some essential, important changes happen. Namely, this is regarding the culturally appropriated and blatantly racist prints that occasionally pop up in LuLaRoe stock. What is Cultural Appropriation? MyLatinatas.com says it best: "Cultural appropriation is the adoption or theft of icons, rituals, aesthetic standards, and behavior from one culture or subculture by another. In terms of fashion, it means taking ones culture and displaying it as a style for yourself without considering where it came from, erasing its history."  Wikipedia adds this: "Cultural appropriation is seen as controversial, even harmful, notably when the cultural property of a minority group is used by members of the dominant culture without the consent of the members of the originating culture; this is seen as misappropriation and a violation of intellectual property rights." The Difference Between Cultural Exchange and Appropriation Purchasing a beautiful Mexican piece of art from a Mexican artist is appreciation. As is wearing a sari during an Indian wedding when invited to by the bridal party. But sporting bindis as a fashion statement and wearing Native American or Mexican costumes at Halloween is appropriation. Examples of Problem Prints at LuLaRoe Aztec(See LLR example here: https://goo.gl/photos/6hqteaTMGRS9H2Dv9)What consumers may not know is that Aztec patterns originated from Mexico. "Aztec" refers to ethnic groups from central Mexico, most known is the group that held empire in Tenochtitlan. These patterns are cultural artifacts.Let's consider that these cultural artifacts were made for trade and for consumption to sustain these ethnic groups' economies.However much that is sold today, the manufacturers aren't "true producers" of this pattern. How much, if any, of the profits are being given to those who originated the pattern? This is certainly not being done with LuLaRoe. (*1) Sugar Skulls(See LuLaRoe example here: https://goo.gl/photos/LR47FbRbZeg5vqpZ9)Sugar Skulls are an important part of Day of the Dead, otherwise known as Dia de los Muertos. It’s a celebration about those who have passed away and takes place every year on November 2. Some people often think that the flower crown and sugar skull face paint is just another spooky costume for them to wear, but it’s a huge part of Mexican culture and tradition. It is a sacred way for them to honor their deceased loved ones. It is not a design to be used in fashion, especially by those who are not a part of the culture. (*2) Native American Headdresses and Dream Catchers(See LuLaroe examples here:https://goo.gl/photos/7Qru6nJM3ywxDxQe8 and herehttps://goo.gl/photos/psXbnVaVZedwuC9DA)Not only is wearing Native American headdresses extreme appropriation, it is an insult to the elders who have spent their entire lives earning the right to wear these spiritual garments. Made-in-China dream catchers and non-Native fabrics displaying these images proliferate the “Native American” marketplace. This not only offends Natives on a racial level, but it takes away the livelihood of authentic, Native artisans who learned their craft through many generations. (*3) South Asian/Indian Imagery(See LuLaRoe example here:https://goo.gl/photos/1ykzXK87Fu5XmZoJA)Using hindu/Indian/asian iconography, including elephants with ethnic designs, is just another form of appropriation. One could easily have plain elephants and no one would be hurt (or the wiser).In addition, the elephants that have saddles or blankets on them also perpetuate the cruel practice of elephant riding. Swastikas(See LuLaRoe example here: https://goo.gl/photos/b7L66ivRzR5PKkSy9)You have to have been born under a rock to not be familiar with what Swastikas mean to western culture. One of the biggest mass murderers in history, Adolf Hitler, used the Swastika to represent the Nazi party. Once WW2 was over, 11 million innocent jews, gays, Poles, Jehovah Witnesses, Romanis, and courageous resisters were dead.What many people don't realize is that the Nazi party stole the Swastika from religious groups, including Hindus and Buddhists. Not only did they appropriate a cultural icon that means "good luck or fortune," but they used it for terror and death.  Black Face Sock Monkey/Golliwog(See LuLaRoe example here:https://goo.gl/photos/Q4BW5aP7ogMsJrtq8)We all know what a sock monkey looks like. The LuLaRoe print shown in the above link is absolutely, 100% not a sock monkey. Instead, it is a Golliwog.The golliwog contributed enormously to the spread of blackface iconography during the late 1800s and into the 20th century. It's one and only purpose was to make black people look unintelligent, ugly, and ridiculous. Even the name itself is a slur. Again, this is another example of the shameful use of racist and appropriating imagery by LuLaRoe.Update on this print: According to my LLR consultant print, LLR will be pulling this print. While this is a good first step, larger strides are still needed within the company to eliminate racism and appropriation. What LuLaRoe Can Do Again, if I didn't love and appreciate LuLaRoe, I wouldn't be bothering with this petition. Instead, I'd be screaming from the rooftops for people to boycott the company. That's why I am hoping LuLaRoe will read and research everything I have said above. Plus, I highly recommend that LLR hire a diversity consulting team who can properly review prints before they are released for sale. Yes, you may at first have a few people who yell and compalin about not having their beloved aztecs or sugar skulls. But replace them with equally unique and beautiful prints and you will not only keep your customers, but you will create more LLR lovers who will appreciate you taking an ethical stance on cultural appropriation.   Thank you so much for the info and help from: http://mylatinitas.com/profiles/blogs/cultures-are-not-trends (*1) http://everydayfeminism.com/2013/09/cultural-exchange-and-cultural-appropriation/ http://www.inquisitr.com/2537340/why-its-offensive-to-wear-a-day-of-the-dead-costume-for-halloween/ (*2) http://everydayfeminism.com/2014/08/honor-native-americans-without-appropriating/ (*3) https://www.buzzfeed.com/meaganb4a1065421/7-examples-of-disgusting-lularoe-prints-xxn7?utm_term=.jsdxwwJrx#.hc7zqqLxz (photo credits) http://wearyourvoicemag.com/more/culture/11-culturally-appropriated-indian-accessories-really-mean

Emily Rinke
251 supporters