Topic

immigration reform

96 petitions

Update posted 1 month ago

Petition to Elizabeth Warren, Richard J. Durbin, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. House of Representatives, Joaquin Castro, Beto O'Rourke, Lindsey Graham, Joe Donnelly

Protect and Preserve Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

As a result of the recent election, the time to preserve vital progress in our nation has come. President-elect Donald Trump’s anticipated immigration plans pose a significant threat to undocumented immigrants nationwide. Undocumented high school graduates wishing to go on to college to further their education, wanting nothing more than to contribute to their communities and to the United States, face a harsh reality after graduating high school. DACA presented hope for a future for many undocumented students across the country. Young children and young adults with aspirations of becoming future doctors, teachers, lawyers, and countless other career paths were given an opportunity to pursue their dreams when Obama announced the DACA program. Donald Trump plans to terminate this, effectively ending all young undocumented students' hopes of obtaining driver’s licenses, work permits, and a college education and putting them at an increased risk for deportation. What is DACA?“Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is a kind of administrative relief from deportation. The purpose of DACA is to protect eligible immigrant youth who came to the United States when they were children from deportation. DACA gives young undocumented immigrants: 1) protection from deportation, and 2) a work permit. The program expires after two years, subject to renewal. PLEASE NOTE: DACA does not grant a path to permanent residency or citizenship. The DREAM Act, which would lead to permanent residency, has NOT passed.”  http://undocu.berkeley.edu/legal-support-overview/what-is-daca/ “On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet several guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal. They are also eligible for work authorization. Deferred action is a use of prosecutorial discretion to defer removal action against an individual for a certain period of time. Deferred action does not provide lawful status.” https://www.uscis.gov/humanitarian/consideration-deferred-action-childhood-arrivals-daca DACA Eligibility RequirementsYou may request DACA if you: 1.     Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012; 2.     Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday; 3.     Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time; 4.     Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS; 5.     Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012; 6.     Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and 7.     Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor,or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.   DACA is not amnesty, nor a direct path to citizenship. DACA allows eligible immigrants to obtain a driver’s license, obtain a work permit, and stay in the country to work toward a path to citizenship without great risk of deportation. Thanks to DACA, these immigrants can share their experiences and talent while developing their skills and education as they work to establish themselves as U.S. Citizens. Pew Research Center estimates there are 11.1 undocumented immigrants in the country while the Department of Homeland Security estimates there are 11.4 undocumented immigrants in the United States as January of 2012—the number only continues to increase. These immigrants are our friends, neighbors, classmates, coworkers, and students. President Obama’s announcement of DACA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RXSlMu5EDI   Obstacles Faced by Immigrants ·       “Most immigration lawyers charge between $5,000 to $7,500 to accompany a client through the green card process.” (http://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=87996&page=1 ·       “Some cases can cost closer to $15,000 before adding on application fees and any potential family members.” (http://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=87996&page=1 ·       “Applicants can spend years marked by a feeling of lost opportunity and helplessness as they wait for the process to conclude.” (http://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=87996&page=1 ·       Many colleges do not accept DACA students ·       Out of state tuition for many DACA college students if they can find a college that accepts them ·       FAFSA cannot be utilized by undocumented students and many scholarships cannot be awarded to undocumented students, putting them at a major disadvantage when it comes to the college application process. ·       Constant association and comparison to terrorists and criminals—including racial profiling. While terrorists and immigrants with malicious intent do get into the country, this is a very small proportion and must not be overgeneralized to the population as a whole. Immigrants, legal or undocumented, tragically face a growing hatred that has been inspired by negative framing of immigrants, use of misleading information, and the strategy of using them as scapegoats. ·       Immigration raids in their communities ·       Being forcibly taken or separated from their families. Children are often separated from their parents because of the deportation process.     Without DACA:• According to the Migration Policy Institute, there are an estimated 1,932,000 DACA eligible immigrants in the U.S. If Donald Trump carries through with his plans to end DACA, these almost 2 million immigrants will be unable to obtain driver’s licenses and work permits, will not be able to work toward their educational dreams, and will be at great risk for deportation • We will be ending the work, progress, and achievements of young immigrants. All of their hard-work and progress will essentially be destroyed • According to the American Psychological Association, there are one million children under the age of 18 who are undocumented and 4.4 million under the age of 30. Those who currently are in the DACA program or are eligible for DACA, will be at major risk for deportation if DACA is ended. • We will be ending the educational paths of future doctors, businessmen and women, skilled trade workers, teachers, and more • We will be tearing apart and ruining families who only wish to work toward becoming U.S. citizens  Please pledge your support to prevent the termination of this vital program and show Donald Trump we do not want to see these young, hardworking, patriotic immigrants separated from their families and forced out of our country. Let us show President-elect Donald Trump that these young students want nothing more to contribute to our country by protecting the program that allows them to work toward their ultimate goal of becoming U.S. citizens. Please remember that DACA is just one program that is in place to help immigrants assimilate into our nation. With Donald Trump’s election, this is only one facet of the immigration progress that is at risk. There is much more that needs to be done. This is just one step. Please share this with friends, family, and coworkers, and remember that we must all come together as Americans or watch our great nation continue to grow divided and crumble before our eyes.  Resources and Further Information: https://www.dhs.gov/immigration-statistics http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/frequently-requested-statistics-immigrants-and-immigration-united-states https://immigrationforum.org/ http://inthecountrywelove.com/ http://www.nationalimmigrationproject.org/ https://www.ilrc.org/ https://www.nilc.org/  http://saalt.org/policy-change/immigrant-rights/daca-stories/ http://unitedwedream.org/dreamer-narratives/daca-stories-arian/ https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/immigration/news/2015/07/09/117054/results-from-a-nationwide-survey-of-daca-recipients-illustrate-the-programs-impact/ http://www.migrationpolicy.org/programs/data-hub/deferred-action-childhood-arrivals-daca-profiles http://www.apa.org/topics/immigration/undocumented-video.aspx https://thinkprogress.org/heres-how-much-trump-s-mass-deportation-policy-would-cost-everyone-3e19f51ff8cf#.8ey83fmt6

Protect DACA
28,065 supporters
Update posted 2 months ago

Petition to Donald J. Trump, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, Department of Veterans Affairs, Alabama State Senate, Alabama State House, Alabama Governor, Florida State Senate, Florida State House, Florida Governor, Georgia State Senate, Georgia State House, Georgia Governor, California State Senate, California State House, California Governor, Connecticut State Senate, Connecticut State House, Connecticut Governor, Wisconsin State Senate, Wisconsin State House, Wisconsin Governor, New York State Senate, New York State House, New York Governor, New Hampshire State Senate, New Hampshire State House, New Hampshire Governor, Maine State Senate, Maine State House, Maine Governor, West Virginia State Senate, West Virginia State House, West Virginia Governor, Arkansas State Senate, Arkansas State House, Arkansas Governor, Nebraska State Senate, Nebraska State House, Nebraska Governor, New Mexico State Senate, New Mexico State House, New Mexico Governor, Utah State Senate, Utah State House, Utah Governor, Ohio State Senate, Ohio State House, Ohio Governor, Missouri State Senate, Missouri State House, Missouri Governor, Mississippi State Senate, Mississippi State House, Mississippi Governor, Delaware State Senate, Delaware State House, Delaware Governor, Rhode Island State Senate, Rhode Island State House, Rhode Island Governor, New Jersey State Senate, New Jersey State House, New Jersey Governor, Arizona State Senate, Arizona State House, Arizona Governor, Oklahoma State Senate, Oklahoma State House, Oklahoma Governor, North Carolina State Senate, North Carolina State House, North Carolina Governor, South Carolina State Senate, South Carolina State House, South Carolina Governor, Illinois State Senate, Illinois State House, Illinois Governor, Tennessee State Senate, Tennessee State House, Tennessee Governor, Virginia State Senate, Virginia State House, Virginia Governor, Massachusetts State Senate, Massachusetts State House, Massachusetts Governor, Kansas State Senate, Kansas State House, Kansas Governor, Texas State Senate, Texas State House, Texas Governor, Michigan State Senate, Michigan State House, Michigan Governor, Pennsylvania State Senate, Pennsylvania State House, Pennsylvania Governor, Nevada State Senate, Nevada State House, Nevada Governor, Minnesota State Senate, Minnesota State House, Minnesota Governor, Colorado State Senate, Colorado State House, Colorado Governor, Oregon State Senate, Oregon State House, Oregon Governor, Kentucky State Senate, Kentucky State House, Kentucky Governor, Washington State Senate, Washington State House, Washington Governor, Indiana State Senate, Indiana State House, Indiana Governor, Maryland State Senate, Maryland State House, Maryland Governor, Vermont State Senate, Vermont State House, Vermont Governor, Idaho State Senate, Idaho State House, Idaho Governor, Alaska State Senate, Alaska State House, Alaska Governor, Louisiana State Senate, Louisiana State House, Louisiana Governor, Hawaii State Senate, Hawaii State House, Hawaii Governor, Puerto Rico State Senate, Puerto Rico State House, Puerto Rico Governor, District Of Columbia State Senate, District Of Columbia State House, District Of Columbia Governor, North Dakota State Senate, North Dakota State House, North Dakota Governor, South Dakota State Senate, South Dakota State House, South Dakota Governor

Congress: Let all children of U.S. military service members unite with their families!

I’m Jenifer Bass, a U.S. Navy veteran, who served for 10 years, one-third in the Asia-Pacific region. It was due to my travel between ports in countries like Japan and Thailand that I first encountered amerasian children, and descendants, of U.S. service members and civilian contractors previously stationed overseas. Filipino Amerasians are abandoned and neglected biracial children of Filipino mothers and American fathers (mostly members of the US armed forces). In the Philippines alone, more than 52,000-plus children were born and left behind after the U.S. Navy withdrew the last of its military personnel in 1992. Right now, the U.S. government won’t legally recognize them as U.S. citizens, despite having been born to an American parent. The Philippine Embassy won't help them either. As a former US colony between 1898 and 1946, the Philippines was home to millions of US soldiers and their dependents, even after its independence. Until 1992, the country hosted two of the largest US military facilities outside the US – Clark Air Base and Subic Naval Base, which played major roles during the Vietnam and first Gulf wars. In 1982 US Public Law 97-359, or the Amerasian Act of 1982, allowed children from Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Kampuchea, or Thailand to move to the US and eventually become American citizens, but those who were from the Philippines were excluded from the law, an exclusion which was upheld by the US Senate on the basis that many Filipino Amerasians were “conceived from illicit affairs and prostitution”, and were born during peacetime. Today, there are estimated to be more than 250,000-plus children. Many amerasians are caught in a no-man’s land of discrimination and poverty -- most left behind by U.S. service members who are unaware that they’ve fathered children overseas. My friend John Haines is one of these sailors. In 2011, John discovered he was the father of a half-Filipino daughter, Jannette. He attempted to unite with her through the American Homecoming Act -- but was frustrated to learn that the Act did not apply to Filipino children of U.S. service members. Today, all John wants is to be united with his daughter and grandchildren. He, like so many other veterans are living with a “hole in their hearts” as they search for ways to unite with their children. There is hope. The Uniting Families Act of 2018, HR 1520, creates a specialized visa allowing military veterans and eligible civilian contractors to sponsor their children and grandchildren for U.S. citizenship. Currently, blood relationship must be proven by DNA test and the total number of visas granted will be capped at 5,000 each year. The issue takes on more urgency as so many of our veterans from our wars in Southeast Asia are getting older and dying each day -- without the chance to connect, or in some cases, reconnect with their own children. John’s daughter Jannette has already undertaken the DNA testing process, conclusively proving her relationship to her American father. All she’s waiting for is the opportunity to permanently unite with her father. There is a PBS documentary, "Left by the Ship" (2010), documenting a day in the life and the personal struggles as a Filipino amerasian on the never ending search for identity and their struggles to connect to their American military families. Please sign this petition to tell Congress that these families cannot wait another day. Pass the Uniting Families Act of 2017, HR 1520, now!

Jenifer Bass
33,373 supporters