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65 petitions

This petition won 3 days ago

Petition to Kulturministeriet

Save the last German WW1 aircraft hangar from demolition

In 1916, a German aircraft hangar was built in Schleswig with the purpose of protecting three zeppelin airship hangars. When the war ended and Germany lost, Denmark got back some of the land it had lost in 1864. Including this part of Schleswig. All hangars in Germany went out of use as the post-war German Army was not allowed to have planes. Most of them were therefore torn down and demolished. The ones that weren't just slowly fell apart. Therefore, it is the last surviving German Aircraft Hangar from the First World War left in Europe (if not the World). The unique hangar is life threatened. It is in an absolutely appalling condition. People are not allowed to enter as the roof can fall down at any time. In fact it will only be a matter of months or years and the hangar will fall apart and be down forever. The Danish Ministry of Culture has decided to help it fall apart by demolishing it. This is possible because the hangar isn't listed. In Denmark there are about 200 castles and manors of historic value that are listed. Listed are also 220 viking rune stones. 2.354 churches as well. And to top it off, about 22.000 burial mounds.       But not that one aircraft hangar. Losing it would of course mean losing an important bit of history and losing one of the few memories from the Great War in Denmark. And of course, this would also mean losing the last surviving German aircraft hangar from the First World War. Not many tourists come to see it as nobody knows about it. It is worth mentioning that due to its already boxy shape, it would be ideal for a museum and this would attract a lot of tourism. This would of course demand much larger amounts of money than the ones mentioned below: To do an acute rescue, about 720.000 kroner (just about 110.000 US dollars) will be sufficient. This will just be enough to stop it from falling apart. Of course to do a complete renovation, a lot more will be needed. To give you an idea of what money are being spent on, a few years ago a new highway was built in a Danish city. They made some "art"-ificial trees made of plastic. They cost a couple of million kroner (about 300.000 USD).   What do we want to achieve with this? Inform the Ministry of Culture that this is a very bad idea. Save the Hangar from being destroyed in either way. Renovating it so that it will not only be standing a few years extra but making sure it will be left standing in a lot of years to come. Of course, this would only be happening if the Ministry of Culture listens to us. (We sure do hope so!)

Bertil Andreasen
2,133 supporters
Update posted 6 days ago

Petition to New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, Corey Johnson, City Council Member Laurie Cumbo, Meenakshi Srinivasan

Protect Poet Walt Whitman's New York City Home

Walt Whitman, America's most famous poet, lived at 99 Ryerson Street in Brooklyn, New York when his world famous book Leaves of Grass was first published in 1855.  While Whitman lived in over 30 places in what is today New York City during this lifetime, the house at 99 Ryerson Street is the ONLY ONE still standing.  Accordingly, 99 Ryerson Street is of great cultural and historical significance.  It tells not only the story of a key moment in American poetry and literature, but also the story of a towering figure in global culture. We are seeking official city landmark designation from New York City to protect the building from demolition, especially because development is encroaching on the neighborhood.  While the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission initially rejected our request, the Commission is currently reviewing additional information and research that we provided on the significance of the site and Walt Whitman's association with the site.  We need your help convincing the Commission to landmark this critically important building. The house at 99 Ryerson Street is one of only two buildings directly associated with Walt Whitman that are still standing in New York City.  It would be an unforgivable tragedy to lose this crucially important building to history.  Join us in protecting this important cultural resource for the benefit and enjoyment of future generations. Quotes from supporters: "To protect a house like this one, it seems to me, is a form of cultural stewardship.For this house to disappear would be something like an extinction: such a place cannot be got back, not ever, once it is lost."  - George Saunders, author of Lincoln in the Bardo and winner of the 2017 Man Booker Prize “During my time as Poet Laureate of the United States, my travels in our country and abroad gave me a renewed sense of Walt Whitman’s ongoing, central importance. Poets writing in other languages, on every continent have looked to Whitman’s work for an epitome of what is most liberating in the culture of the United States. Please let me add my voice to those hoping that you will recognize his house in Brooklyn as a true landmark.”  - Robert Pinsky, former U.S. Poet Laureate "I feel a particular relationship to Whitman and, maybe more to the point, a strong sense of just how much impact not only his work but his physical presence had on the New York City of his day. I do hope you’ll revisit the question of the house on Ryerson as a historic landmark."  - Michael Cunningham, award winning author  “2019 marks the bicentennial of Walt Whitman’s birth. We hope to celebrate Whitman’s groundbreaking contributions to literature by landmarking the site most associated with his seminal work by the time that key milestone arrives. I hope the Commission understands this is not about the architectural merit of 99 Ryerson Street but rather its incredibly significant cultural value.” - Professor Karen Karbiener, founder of the Walt Whitman Initiative “The city needs more landmarks like this one to help narrate the histories of LGBT Americans – and it needs to consider cultural landmarks seriously rather than aesthetic landmarks alone.” - Jay Shockley, co-founder of the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project “If Whitman’s Leaves of Grass gave birth to American poetry, then Brooklyn is thebirthplace of our art, and 99 Ryerson Street is the last remaining cradle. The Commission needs to reconsider its initial rejection.” - Jason Koo, executive director and founder of Brooklyn Poets

Brad Vogel
710 supporters
Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to The NY State legislature, Andrew Cuomo

Return the Cuomo Bridge its original name: The Tappan Zee. That bridge is our history.

UPDATE: A fundraiser was started on December 1, 2017 to support this cause that has already raised over $8,800 from over 300 individuals making small donations to fund a full-blown advertising campaign. We have also recently started a Fundraiser here on Change.org as well.  We are now officially Save Our Tappan Zee, Inc., a NY not-for-profit corporation. You can choose to support us via the Change.org fundraiser here, or you can read more and also consider supporting us at www.SaveOurTappanZee.org and www.GoFundMe.com/SaveTheTappanZee ORIGINAL PETITION STORY: In the summer of 2017, the N.Y. State Legislature voted to rename the famous and now rebuilt Tappan Zee Bridge (named for the Tappan Indians and the Dutch) after former NY governor Mario Cuomo.  While Mr. Cuomo may be deserving of something named after him, it should not be at the expense of history, and the original settlers of our land: the Tappan Indians and the Dutch.  And certainly not at taxpayer expense.  The name Tappan Zee has no politics associated with it.  And it properly recognizes the true founders of this land: the Tappan Indians and the Dutch. Plus, it sounds cool to say, “I’m taking the Tappan Zee.”  It does not sound cool to say, “I’m taking the Cuomo.”  Come on people!   Most importantly, we should not recognize the contributions of one in history by destroying a memorial to another.  Out of curiosity, why didn't the tax payers have a direct vote since we are the ones who ultimately paid for it, and will through toll taxes?  Didn’t a large part of the funding come from a FEDERAL grant? That is OUR bridge. America’s bridge. New York’s bridge. Last I checked, Mario Cuomo and his family did not personally contribute hundreds of millions to its construction... It is time for Albany to do the right thing: bring back the former name of the Tappan Zee Bridge. We want our bridge’s name back. In less than one week, I have amassed more than 27,000 names to my petition to return the Indian & Dutch name to the Tappan Zee Bridge. We are furious that the state legislature voted to rename OUR bridge the Cuomo Bridge in the dead of night without any input from the public. In 2008, the famous and historic Triborough Bridge was renamed the RFK. Now the famous and historic Tappan Zee is the Cuomo. What’s next? The GW? The Golden Gate? The Grand Canyon? Politicians should not be able to do this unilaterally. Why aren’t these national landmarks? I know the Journal News has a section devoted specifically to news of the bridge once known as the Tappan Zee Bridge. Isn’t it ironic, that even THEY still call it the Tappan Zee? But not for long. Sure, our older generations may continue calling it the Tappan Zee, but Generation Z? Soon all signs will be changed. In 30 years, the Indian and Dutch heritage that inspired the naming of the bridge will be gone. And for what? For someone who had NOTHING to do with EITHER bridge and provided ZERO personal funding for the bridge. Governor Cuomo states that because it's a new bridge, it deserves a new name.  But that conflicts again with history.  England's London Bridge was destroyed four times and each time, it was rebuilt anew, but the name never changed.  Why?  History.  Place.  Tradition.  Florida's Cape Canaveral was renamed Cape Kennedy only to see its original name returned a few years later.  Why?  History.  Place.  Tradition.  The same should and can happen here.   I hope you will join our collective outrage. We want our bridge back. Immediately.  Sincerely, -Dr. Monroe Mann, PhD, Esq, MBA P.S. - the original bridge was called the Governor Malcolm Wilson–Tappan Zee Bridge, known commonly as the Tappan Zee. So why can’t the new one be called the Governors Cuomo/Wilson—Tappan Zee Bridge?  In this way, we recognize Cuomo while not destroying the bridge’s true namesake. Why shouldn’t this happen?  The answer: there is NO reason. It should happen immediately, at very minimum. At best, it should just be the Tappan Zee Bridge. MEDIA COVERAGE TO DATE INCLUDES:(Links coming soon.  In meantime, just search Google or Bing)* Front page of the NY Post* Editorial endorsing the petition in the NY Post* The Journal News (multiple articles, including an amazing one sharing the breathtaking contributions of the Tappan Indians on our nation)* CBS 2 TV* Spectrum TV NY* Fios TV NY* The NY Daily News* Hamodia* Pix 11 News* NYStateofPolitics.com* Tarrytown Patch* The Los Angeles Times* The New York Times* The Yeshiva World* NY1* WestFair Online* NewsDay* News 12 Westchester UPDATE: A fundraiser was started on December 1, 2017 to support this cause that has already raised over $4,500 from nearly 200 individuals making small donations. You can read more and also consider supporting us at www.GoFundMe.com/SaveTheTappanZee

Monroe Mann
107,041 supporters