Topic

Girls Education

16 petitions

Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to Yoweri Museveni Kaguta

Urge Ugandan President Museveni to pass the acid attack bill now.

After having lived for seven years with an abusive husband, I decided it was time to leave. I didn’t think I would survive another year if I stayed, so in 2011, I walked out the door and broke the crippling silence and isolation the abuse had made me feel. I felt empowered and free and finally looked forward to my future. But because I left my marriage, my husband considered me “disobedient” and, therefore, worthy of punishment. One day, he called me to pick up my children at his house and suddenly acid was thrown at my face and body. The next thing I knew, my face felt as if it were on fire. My skin was  literally melting away. He thought he would break my spirit, but he only made me stronger. Since my attack, I have been fighting to put an end to this horrific practice in my country of Uganda, and I need your help to do it. Please support our petition by asking H.E. President Yoweri Museveni Kaguta to sign the Toxic Chemicals Bill into law. That is my story, but there are many more, each one as harrowing as the last. Acid violence occurs around the globe and isn’t specific to race or religion. My country, Uganda, has some of the highest rates of acid violence. In fact, since 1985, there have been nearly 400 reported cases of acid attacks here, and in just one hospital alone, they have reported 8 attacks and two deaths this year.  And those are just the ones that were reported. The real statistics are likely much higher. My name is Hanifa Nakiryowa, and my fellow acid attack survivor Gloria Kankunda and I have founded the Center for Rehabilitation of Survivors of Acid and burns Violence (CERESAV). We founded CERESAV because of our personal experiences, and because of the stories we were told by fellow victims. CERESAV’s ultimate goal is to address the issue of acid attacks and gender violence on a global level, but today we have a chance to make a difference in Uganda by helping to pass legislation that would classify products like acid as controlled substances. Cutting off easy access to acid has proven to  drastically reduce the rate of attacks in other countries.   Research indicates that the most effective ways to reduce acid violence are through regulation of the sale of acid, tougher jail sentences for perpetrators, and raising awareness of the devastating impact that acid attacks have on individuals and their families. Step by step, CERESAV hopes to make all of these things a reality, but we can’t do it alone.   With collective efforts, we can end this devastating act and save the next potential victim. I know we can make a difference. When strong women and fellow victims of female-directed violence, like Jaha who fought to end female genital mutilation, or Malala who is a champion for girls’ education started Change.org petitions, great things happened. Please join me in asking H.E. President Yoweri Museveni Kaguta to sign the Toxic Chemicals Bill into law.

Hanifa Nakiryowa
281,873 supporters
Update posted 6 days ago

Petition to US School Boards, Department of Education, Ronnie L. McGehee

Dress Codes are humiliating objectifying, and sexualizing girls with the school dress code

HEY! Do I have your attention? OR do I need to show my bra straps or midriff to get that? I am a 14 year old student in my 9th grade year. I want to send a wake up call to the school boards all over the United States. It is time for a change! #letsmovemountains We are TIRED of missing out on valuable education because of the dress code! We are SICK of being objectified by unequally enforced dress codes! News alert, your dress code is perpetuating rape culture and oppressive objectification towards women. It’s time for change. The black, white, and grey areas of the dress codes are not even equally enforced within the schools. Some girls can’t wear cool shorts and tank tops in extreme heat without facing immediate detention, yet cheerleaders can wear uniforms that violate the dress code. Boys are allowed to run around the track, or even the parking lot during school hours with NO shirt on, but girls can’t show a shoulder blade? Men are rarely told that their arms, legs, stomachs, backs, shoulders… (their whole body?!) are a problem… a distraction. They are most often seen as human beings and not objects. Yet, EVERY time a handbook with these dress codes is handed out, every assembly to talk about what we cannot wear that takes time away from our classroom, every single day in our schools we are teaching girls that their bodies are something to be ashamed of. The dress codes girls face in our daily life are promoting an oppressive objectification towards women. Each time a girl is pulled away from her education because of the clothes they wear or the color of their hair, you are ROBBING her of education. You are HUMILIATING her in front of her peers. You are SHAMING her. You are SEXUALIZING a young woman and encouraging others to do so, too. This needs to stop now. Instead, take the time to teach the BOYS that girls are not objects. And while you're at it, teach the girls that they are not objects and have nothing to be ashamed of in an effort  to remove some of the pressure society has placed where it doesn't belong. A woman should never have to cover parts of her body based on a man not being able to control his thoughts, and more importantly, his actions. According to a study by the American Association of University Women, in 2000, of the 2,064 students surveyed, 83% of girls said they had been sexually harassed at school and 38% said they were sexually harassed by teachers or employees (Hostile Hallways, 2001). Only 10% reported their harassment. Do you think this is because they were wearing tank tops? Maybe because their shorts were too short? No, it’s because all through growing up, boys get the excuse that boys will be boys and girls are faced with dress codes that teach them that if they are objectified, if they are harassed, and even if they are assaulted, it was because of something they did. Is this the world we want to create for the future? We are collecting signatures to show you that we want to create a change that gives all students a better education experience. We want to CHANGE the way girls and women are viewed as distractions. We just want an equal opportunity for education.   “Hostile Hallways”. American Association of University Women. 2001. Retrieved October 10, 2017.

Jennifer Bruce
391 supporters
This petition won 4 weeks ago

Petition to U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives

Offer Computer Science in our public schools

America should be a leader in computer science education, yet today most schools don't even offer this foundational subject. Please join the CEOs, governors, and education leaders below and ask Congress to support computer science in every K-12 school – for our children, and for their future. Every student in America should have this opportunity. Dear Members of Congress and fellow Americans, As business leaders, elected officials, educators, and members of the public, we join forces to deliver a bipartisan message about opportunity and the American Dream.  Technology is transforming society at an unprecedented rate. Whether it’s smartphones or social networks, self-driving cars or personalized medicine, nothing embodies the American Dream so much as the opportunity to change or even reinvent the world with technology. And participating in this world requires access to computer science in our schools. We ask you to provide funding for every student in every school to have an opportunity to learn computer science. Support for this idea is sweeping our nation. Ninety percent of parents want their children to have access to computer science education at school, and teachers agree. They know that technology opens doors. A hundred thousand teachers have taken matters into their own hands and already begun teaching computer science. Over 100 school districts are rolling out courses, from New York to Chicago to Los Angeles, from Miami to Las Vegas. Twenty states have passed policies and are now looking to support professional training for new computer science teachers. Private donors have collectively committed tens of millions of dollars to solving this problem, including $48 million of new commitments announced today by many of the undersigned. Despite this groundswell, three-quarters of U.S. schools do not offer meaningful computer science courses. At a time when every industry in every state is impacted by advances in computer technology, our schools should give all students the opportunity to understand how this technology works, to learn how to be creators, coders, and makers — not just consumers. Instead, what is increasingly a basic skill is only available to the lucky few, leaving most students behind, particularly students of color and girls. How is this acceptable? America leads the world in technology. We invented the personal computer, the Internet, e-commerce, social networking, and the smartphone. This is our chance to position the next generation to participate in the new American Dream. Not only does computer science provide every student foundational knowledge, it also leads to the highest-paying, fastest-growing jobs in the U.S. economy. There are currently over 500,000 open computing jobs, in every sector, from manufacturing to banking, from agriculture to healthcare, but only 50,000 computer science graduates a year. Whether a student aspires to be a software engineer, or if she just wants a well-rounded education in today’s changing world, access to computer science in school is an economic imperative for our nation to remain competitive. And with the growing threat of cyber warfare, this is even a critical matter of national security. Despite this growing need, targeted federal funding to carry out these efforts in classrooms is virtually non-existent. This bipartisan issue can be addressed without growing the federal budget. We urge you to amplify and accelerate the local efforts in classrooms, unlock opportunity in every state, and give an answer to all the parents and teachers who believe that every student, in every school, should have a chance to learn computer science. Sincerely, Business LeadersArne Sorenson, CEO, Marriott Barry Diller, Chairman, IAC and Expedia Bill and Melinda Gates Bobby Kotick, CEO, Activision Blizzard Brad Smith, President, MicrosoftBrian Chesky, CEO, AirbnbBrian Cornell, Chairman and CEO, TargetDoug McMillon, CEO, WalmartDaniel Schulman, CEO, Paypal. Chairman, SymantecDara Khosrowshahi, CEO, ExpediaDevin Wenig, CEO, eBayDrew Houston, CEO, DropboxDoug Parker, Chairman and CEO, American AirlinesEdward Breen, Chairman and CEO, DuPontEric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Alphabet, Inc.Ginni Rometty, Chairman and CEO, IBMGrant Verstandig, CEO, Rally HealthHerb Allen, President, Allen & CompanyJack Dorsey, CEO, Twitter and SquareJames Murdoch, CEO, 21st Century FoxJames P. Gorman, Chairman and CEO, Morgan StanleyJeff Bezos, Chairman and CEO, AmazonJeremy Stoppelman, CEO, YelpJessica Alba, CEO, The Honest CompanyJoe Lonsdale, Partner, 8VC. Founder, PalantirJohn Battelle, Chairman and CEO, NewCoJohn Donahoe, Chairman, PaypalJohn J. Legere – President & CEO, T-Mobile US, Inc.Julie Sweet, Chief Executive, Accenture North AmericaLarry EllisonLarry Fink, Chairman and CEO, BlackRockLowell McAdam, Chairman and CEO, VerizonMarc Benioff, Chairman and CEO, SalesforceMark Cuban, Owner, Dallas Mavericks, Landmark TheatresMark Zuckerberg, Chairman and CEO, FacebookOscar Munoz, CEO, United AirlinesRami Rahim, CEO, Juniper NetworksRandall Stephenson, Chairman and CEO, AT&TReid Hoffman, Chairman, LinkedInRich Barton, Chairman, ZillowRichard Anderson, CEO, Delta AirlinesRobert A. Iger, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney CompanySam Altman, President, Y CombinatorSamuel Allen, Chairman and CEO, John DeereSatya Nadella, CEO, MicrosoftSheryl Sandberg, COO, FacebookTerry J. Lundgren, Chairman and CEO, Macy's, IncTim Cook, CEO, AppleVishal Sikka, CEO, Infosys GovernorsAsa Hutchinson, Governor, Arkansas (R)Brian Sandoval, Governor, Nevada (R)C.L. "Butch" Otter, Governor, Idaho (R)Charlie Baker, Governor, Massachusetts (R)Dannell P. Malloy, Governor, Connecticut (D)David Y. Ige, Governor, Hawaii (D)Doug Ducey, Governor, Arizona (R)Earl Ray Tomblin, Governor, West Virginia (D)Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor, California (D)Gina M. Raimondo, Governor, Rhode Island (D)Jack Dalrymple, Governor, North Dakota (R)Jack Markell, Governor, Delaware (D)Jay Inslee, Governor, Washington (D)John Hickenlooper, Governor, Colorado (D)Kate Brown, Governor, Oregon (D)Maggie Hassan, Governor, New Hampshire (D)Mark Dayton, Governor, Minnesota (D)Mary Fallin, Governor, Oklahoma (R)Matt Bevin, Governor, Kentucky (R)Matt Mead, Governor, Wyoming (R)Mike Pence, Governor, Indiana (R)Peter Shumlin, Governor, Vermont (D)Phil Bryant, Governor, Mississippi (R)Rick Snyder, Governor, Michigan (R)Steve Bullock, Governor, Montana (D)Susana Martinez, Governor, New Mexico (R)Terry Branstad, Governor, Iowa (R)Terry McAuliffe, Governor, Virginia (D) K-12 LeadersAntwan Wilson, Superintendent, OaklandBob Runcie, Superintendent, Broward County Public SchoolsCarmen Fariña, Chancellor, NYC Department of EducationForrest Claypool, CEO, Chicago Public SchoolsKenneth Huewitt, Interim Superintendent, Houston ISDKimberly Hill, Superintendent, Charles County Public SchoolsMichelle King, Superintendent, Los Angeles UnifiedPat Skorkowsky, Superintendent, Clark County School DistrictRichard Carranza, Superintendent, San Francisco UnifiedRichard Woods, State Superintendent, GeorgiaSusan Enfield, Superintendent, Highline Public SchoolsTom Torlakson, State Superintendent, California EducationNonprofit LeadersBobby Schnabel, CEO, Association for Computing MachineryCornell Brooks, President and CEO, NAACPDaniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents AssociationDavid Coleman, CEO, College BoardElisa Villanueva Beard, CEO, Teach For AmericaGail Connelly, ED, National Association of Elementary School PrincipalsHadi Partovi, CEO, Code.orgJudy Vredenburgh, President and CEO, Girls Inc.Lee Hood, MD, PhD, President, Institute for Systems Biology. Co-founder, AmgenLinda D. Hallman, CEO, American Association of University WomenLucy Sanders, CEO, National Center for Women and ITMark Nelson, Executive Director, CS Teachers AssociationMatthew Randazzo, CEO, National Math & Science InitiativePeggy Brookins, CEO, National Board for Professional Teaching StandardsTelle Whitney, CEO, Anita Borg Institute for Women and TechnologyThomas J. Gentzel, Executive Director, National School Boards AssociationVince Bertram, CEO, Project Lead The Way     Please join us. After signing, please spread the word. 

CS Education Coalition, in partnership with Code.org
140,686 supporters