Topic

Food

442 petitions

Started 2 days ago

Petition to Walmart, Doug McMillon

Walmart: Don’t sell GMO Frankenfish

Frankenfish is the first genetically engineered animal for food that the FDA has approved for human consumption. And the first genetically engineered animal allowed to enter the food supply anywhere. Its DNA has been altered to speed growth. It’s called “AquaAdvantage Salmon,” and it has the hormone gene from the Chinook salmon and from another fish called the ocean pout. By altering the salmon’s DNA with these two other fish’s DNA, it grows much faster than it is naturally capable of growing. What’s worse is that the USDA’s new guidelines don’t require adequate mandatory labeling. So consumers won’t know whether the fish they are eating is genetically engineered or not. Families deserve to know whether the fish they’re eating is genetically modified fish or wild salmon. This could absolutely open the floodgates to other genetically modified foods. It also puts Alaska’s sustainable fisheries’ future in jeopardy. We need Walmart to stand with us and commit to not selling genetically modified frankenfish. There are more than 5,000 Walmart stores in the US, and if they committed to not sell this fish, it would make it more likely that companies don’t invest in genetically modified foods in the future. More than 80 grocery stores and retailers (including Costco, Safeway, Whole Foods, and Target) have promised that they will not sell this fish. Ask Walmart to add themselves to this list.

Campaigns Lab
26 supporters
Update posted 3 days ago

Petition to Starbucks, Kevin Johnson, Luigi Bonini, Chris Carr, Adam Brotman, Aimee Johnson, Rosalind Brewer

Starbucks: Take the Next Step and Offer a Vegan Food Menu!

Starbucks was one of the first national coffee chains to offer soy milk, and in the past year, the company has also added coconut milk to its menu as well as announced the expansion of its Animal Welfare-Friendly Practices. In light of these positive steps forward, Starbucks should continue its progress by taking the next step: offer vegan food options!      Right now, a growing number of consumers looking for dairy-free coffee beverages can turn to Starbucks for soy milk or coconut milk – but that’s where Starbuck’s menu falls short.  Plant-based food options are limited to oatmeal and a few pre-packaged fruit-based snacks. By expanding its food menu to include hearty meat-, egg-, and dairy-free options such as vegan muffins or a protein-packed breakfast sandwich, Starbucks would give existing customers more choices while also reaching out to a new customer-base. This simple change will allow so many more customers to add a breakfast item with their coffee, stay for lunch, enjoy a pastry, or grab some food to go. Recent market trend research shows that vegan eating is hitting the mainstream. A recent restaurant industry journal noted that “Millennials are increasingly interested in vegan cuisine, and more than 60 percent consume meat alternatives.” Consumer interest in plant-based food and drink has become so widespread that Starbucks acknowledges that its decision to add coconut milk was based on customer requests – it was one of the “most popular My Starbucks Ideas of all time!” Other national chains similar to Starbucks are already responding to the consumer interest in plant-based options. For example, in addition to dairy-free milk for coffee, Le Pain Quotidien’s menu features several hearty vegan options from breakfast through dessert, Au Bon Pain has a daily vegan soup, and Einstein Bros Bagels offers hummus or peanut butter toppings for bagels. It is clear that consumer demand is shifting towards healthier and more humane foods, and Starbucks has taken the first steps to respond. Now it’s time for the company to take the next step -- and take the lead -- by offering a substantial plant-based food options.  Starbucks has already shown that it listens to consumer requests, so please sign this petition to let the company know that you appreciate the dairy-free milk options, and you’re ready for a vegan food menu!

Jane Velez-Mitchell and Compassion Over Killing
31,259 supporters
Update posted 3 days ago

Petition to Larry Merlo, CVS Pharmacy

Tell CVS to Donate Don't Dump

For about a year, I’ve walked up and down the streets of New York City in the evenings to save perfectly good food and other items from CVS’s trash, which I then gift to friends, family, and people in need. I find it ridiculous - and frankly disrespectful - to see how much CVS wastes when millions of people, including CVS’s own employees, struggle to put food on the table. CVS, as a policy, throws out excess, slightly damaged, or about-to-expire merchandise. In CVS's trash in New York I've found unopened toothpaste, bars of soap, tissues, and shelf-stable food like Oreos and oatmeal (which safely can be eaten months after the best by date*). All of this should have been donated. Over the course of several months I've emailed CVS's CEO Larry Merlo about this multiple times, and as direct result have spoken to regional management about this multiple times. They've promised to donate more, but nothing has changed. I'm hoping this petition can pressure CVS to make donation their default. Tell CVS to #donatedontdump Donate to a local shelter, food pantry, or church. CVS has a national partnership with Feeding America, but still a lot of food and usable merchandise is thrown out. CVS should not only allow regional managers to form partnerships with local charities, but should reward them for doing so (make it part of their performance appraisal, for example). If donation is not a possibility, allow employees to take home food and other usable items that would otherwise be thrown out. Employees, most of whom make minimum wage, are forbidden from taking home or donating excess merchandise to those in need, and might be fired for doing so. CVS should allow employees to take home items that would otherwise be thrown out. Thank you for your help! I hope you'll sign and share this petition. -Anna *Legally, only baby formula needs to have a best by date. Best by dates on all other products are voluntarily put there by manufacturers and often only indicate product quality, not product safety. If anyone were to get sick from donated food, CVS would be protected from legal liability under the Good Samaritan Food Donation Act. In addition, there have been no recorded lawsuits related to food donation.

Anna Sacks
284 supporters