Topic

environmental protection

37 petitions

Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to Hon Dr Steven Miles, Hon William (Bill) Byrne, Annastacia Palaszczuk

STOP Commercial Netting in the Great Sandy Marine Park !

IT’S TIME to end damaging commercial netting in the Great Sandy Marine Park! The Great Sandy Marine Park is THE ONLY Marine Park that allows commercial netting in what “should be” TRUE YELLOW CONSERVATION ZONE AREAS! Ending damaging commercial netting in the Great Sandy Marine Park – which has already been tentatively listed as a World Heritage Area, will bring a much needed boost to an environment deserving of proper marine protection. Using commercial nets to: Target spawning aggregations MUST BE STOPPED Target bream, whiting and flathead in conservation park yellow zones MUST BE STOPPED Target top level predators like mackerel , trevally, barramundi , threadfin salmon and shark MUST BE STOPPED Target low food value but high recreational fishing value fish like Golden Trevally, Snub nosed dart ( Permit ) , Queenfish, Giant Herring etc. MUST BE STOPPED Incidentally catch dugongs and marine turtles is definitely MUST BE STOPPED  NOTE - The Great Sandy Designated Area incorporates areas of conservation park zones in :- Baffle Creek & tributaries The Elliott River & tributaries The Burrum River & tributaries The Mary River & tributaries The Great Sandy Strait and Tin Can Bay Inlet Sign this PETITION to request Dr Steven Miles - Minister for Environment and Heritage Protection and Minister for National Parks and the Great Barrier Reef and the Palaszczuk State Government to commit to ending destructive commercial netting operations in the Great Sandy Marine Park and adjacent waterways under the current full term 10 year review to restore fish stocks and help protect the Queensland urban coast’s largest dugong population.

Fraser Coast Fishing Alliance Inc
4,721 supporters
This petition won 2 weeks ago

Petition to Steve Howard, John Wakefield, Gladys Berejiklian

Stop the littering of the Wentworth Courier

The Eastern suburbs local community in Sydney is alarmed by the systematic littering of a local newspaper, the "Wenthworth Courier". Every Wednesday, the newspaper deverses hundreds of kilos of pastic-filmed free magazines in the Beachside communities such as Bondi, Bronte, Tamarama or even further like Randwick, etc...regardless of your choice to have the said journal delivered, delivery people throw them in the streets, sometimes by dozens in pack in the pathways. Even after opting out, we've seen the journal back on porches after a few weeks. We, the people, would like the Journal to re-think its way of distribution and adopt a voluntary subscribing system instead of throwing hundreds of magazines in the streets and in nature. Needless to say we are close to our oceans, and numerous of those NON RECYCLABLE items end up in the water nearby. Considering digital distribution in 2017 seems like a effective way to stop the littering, and resolve the distribution issues all in once as well. The Wentworth Courier had numerous emails and calls of locals complaining but is refusing to adopt a better, more ecologic way of distributing its copies. Local councils are washing their hands of the issue as they are linked to the distributor. NSW Environment doesn't seem to think the issue is big enough. We believe if we can reach Mr Howard the editor, we can come up with solutions better for our community and our planet.    

Lucas Cristofle
482 supporters
Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to Jane Smith

Central Coast Council: Establish an Urban Forest Strategy for the Central Coast

Since the introduction of the NSW Government's State Environmental Planning Policy (SEPP) Affordable Housing 2009, the Central Coast has experienced unprecedented loss of mature trees in front and back yards. For every granny flat that goes up, mature trees are coming down - yet the Central Coast Council is doing nothing to offset the devastating loss of shade and habitat. A growing number of cities (for example, City of Sydney, Perth and - now famously - City of Melbourne) are prioritising proactive tree planting and shade production in their town planning by publishing Urban Forest Strategies*, yet the Central Coast - an area experiencing some of the most rapid population growth in NSW - still does not have formal shade production and green space targets. Moreover, the council has recently stopped providing residents with free native trees, something it has done for decades. WHY? Following years of a passive (some would argue, retrograde) approach to managing existing trees, including a lack of any strategic plans for succession planting and carbon offsetting, Central Coast suburbs are gradually becoming hotter, drier and more barren. Pedestrians - primarily children, mothers with prams and the elderly - are met with shadeless streets which on a summer day make the simple pursuit of walking an unbearable task. Newcomers to the Central Coast are often heard remarking at the lack of shade, and the absence of atmospheric tree-lined streets in shopping strips and urban spaces. In an area known for its National Parks and world-class beaches, the back streets of Central Coast suburbs present a stark contrast.  We know that granny flats and multiple dwelling developments - much-needed affordable housing options for many - are here to stay. What we urge the Central Coast Council to acknowledge is that as the population becomes denser, and larger homes and less green space become the norm unique stresses are being placed on our suburbs. Planners and policy-makers can no longer ignore the requirement for strategic policies and programs to not only increase the retention of existing hardy trees, but to proactively add to the urban canopy to ensure shade for the future.  We call on Jane Smith and the new Central Coast Council to act now to establish policies and guidelines to prevent unnecessary tree removal and to promote proactive tree planting in suburbs, parks and nature strips. We urge you to take the steps needed to ensure that Central Coast suburbs are vibrant and liveable places...now, and in the future. Many, many cities already have Urban Forest Plans which formalise the value and benefits of trees as community and environmental assets worthy of protection and promotion. *Urban Forest Plan. An urban forest is broadly defined as the collection of green spaces, trees and other vegetation that grows within an urban area, on both public and private land. It provides a range of social, environmental and economic benefits that enrich the quality of urban life. Reference: https://www.perth.wa.gov.au/planning-development/city-initiatives/urban-forest-plan Additional resources: http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/community/parks-open-spaces/urban-forest/Pages/urban-forest-strategy.aspx http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/live/trees/urban-forest http://202020vision.com.au/media/53149/urban-forest-strategy-fa_lores_spreads.pdf      

G.U.S.T (Grow Urban Shade Trees)
777 supporters