Topic

Environment

1,239 petitions

Update posted 9 hours ago

Petition to California State House, California State Senate, California Governor, Ben Allen, Steven Bradford, Al Muratsuchi, Joe Buscaino, Dr. Clark Parker Sr., William Burke

Take Action to ban hydrofluoric acid in CA refineries - Please FWD

As a critical and time-sensitive public safety issue, we call on California lawmakers to vote in favor of AB 1645 and AQMD Board Members to adopt Rule 1410 to BAN and REPLACE MHF and HF alkylation at California refineries. We recommend a deadline of 2022 for elimination of MHF/HF alkylation, to be replaced with an alternative of the refinery’s choice. Commercially available options include sulfuric acid, ionic liquid, and solid acid catalyst. The industry is mounting massive lobbying and PR campaigns to thwart both efforts. Don’t listen to the industry’s misleading economic scare tactics. The community must rise up to show massive support for AB 1645 and Rule 1410. If we do, we can win this battle. We survived the Torrance refinery shut down; a MHF transition should be shorter and have less impact. After signing this petition visit TRAASouthBay.com to send letters of support to the SCAQMD board and CA legislators and sign up for TRAA’s twice-a-month newsletter to COORDINATE with us and follow the news. For a lawn sign, write to LawnSigns@TRAASouthBay.com. You can donate online at TRAASouthBay.com. “LIKE” Torrance Refinery Action Alliance on Facebook and like and share our posts. fb.me/BanMHF  Learn more on the website. TELL YOUR FRIENDS. Come to a TRAA meeting to work with your neighbors on this cause, the 1st and 3rd Monday each month (except holidays) 6:00-8:00 p.m. Sizzler 2880 Sepulveda Blvd, Torrance. Back room. Or email TRAASouthBay@gmail.org to offer help. ALERT: This affects residents in Torrance, Redondo Beach, Gardena, Carson, Lawndale, Hawthorne, Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach, Wilmington, L.A., Lomita, Rolling Hills, San Pedro, Palos Verdes Estates, West Rancho Dominguez, and Long Beach, California. BACKGROUND During the February 18, 2015 explosion at the Torrance refinery, a flying 80,000 lb. piece of equipment slammed down at 60 MPH just 5 ft. from a tank with 50,000 lb. of modified hydrofluoric acid (MHF). Federal safety officials say the surrounding communities "dodged a bullet.” The Chemical Safety Board says that accident could have been catastrophic.  One of the world’s most dangerous industrial chemicals, hydrofluoric acid (HF), is used in massive quantities in only two California refineries, Torrance and the Valero in Wilmington. The eight other CA refineries with alkylation units use a much safer alternative — sulfuric acid. HF refineries claim an additive mixed in with the HF makes it safe. But with only one or two additive molecules per hundred molecules of MHF, it’s too little to make a difference. “Modified” HF (MHF) is just as deadly as HF. If released, it forms a ground-hugging cloud that can drift for miles, causing death and injury. The refineries’ other mitigation measures, like water sprays and barriers, are also ineffective. Mass casualties can result from an MHF release — wind direction determines who dies.  The US EPA has conducted a preliminary investigation into MHF http://bit.ly/2poBJro. The AQMD has reviewed innumerable technical documents from the refineries. (Chart 5, http://bit.ly/2wBHeUh)   Both this preliminary EPA inspection report and the initial AQMD staff recommendations were that MHF risk is assumed identical to HF risk. The US Chemical Safety Board and Department of Justice have sued ExxonMobil to get proprietary information on MHF.  The 2015 accident could have created an HF plume large enough to cause 16 miles of serious irreversible injuries. Death would be possible within the first 8 miles. In 2015 the air was moving to the WSW so the plume would have headed out to sea. People would have died all the way to the Redondo Beach pier. Twenty three schools lie within the main debris field left by the explosion. Even if emergency systems kept 90% of the tank’s acid from escaping, the remaining 5,000 lb. acid plume would have been large enough to kill people nearly all the way to the beach. The EPA's, CSB’s, and AQMD’s MHF investigations are due to activism and scientific sleuthing by local residents, who joined forces in the Torrance Refinery Action Alliance (TRAA). Local scientists on our Advisory Panel discovered MHF is over 98% HF by molecule count and behaves exactly like HF at normal refinery operating temperatures and pressures. http://bit.ly/2p6dPCn The industry has been lying to us for 27 years. MHF is no safer than HF. Yet, industry is still lying.  It’s up to us, the residents. The South Bay must not accept the status of “sacrifice zone” to benefit PBF in Torrance and Valero in Wilmington, or to avoid a short one-time disruption during the transition. How much are more than a half-million Californians worth?  See our website to write to legislators and AQMD board members. TRAASouthBay.org  You can also call or fax! California Governor Jerry Brown Phone: (916) 445-2841 Fax: (916) 558-3160 email: https://govnews.ca.gov/gov39mail/index.php California State Senator Ben Allen  Capitol Office (916) 651-4026 District Office (310) 318-6994 email http://sd26.senate.ca.gov/contact/message California State Senator Steven Bradford  Capitol Office (916) 651-4035 District Office (310) 514-8573 email http://sd35.senate.ca.gov/contact California State Assembly Al Muratsuchi Capitol office (916) 319-2066 District Office (310) 375-0691 email: https://lcmspubcontact.lc.ca.gov/PublicLCMS/ContactPopup.php?district=AD66  

MODIFIED HYDROFLUORIC ACID RISK
9,364 supporters
Update posted 10 hours ago

Petition to St. Johns River Water Management District, Nanatte Church, Gretchen Kelley

Hydroblasting (Round 2): Request for Public Hearing

The St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) is considering Webster Creek Development, Inc's. application allowing HYDROBLASTING (aka hydroleveling) in the Mosquito Lagoon Aquatic Preserve, New Smyrna Beach, FL. Initial review by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) resulted in rejection of the application, however, the SJRWMD is favoring approval and has encouraged the applicant to reapply to the USACE.  We are concerned that such activity will have long-term, negative impact on the water quality in the Indian River Lagoon and request a public hearing.                                                                                                                                              From a recent correspondence to applicant:                                                  "We would like to continue working informally with you to resolve these and any other issues related to the application."                               "Staff suggests resubmittal to the Army Corps of Engineers as soon as possible so that the project can be reviewed in tandem and the permitting effort is as efficient as possible."                                                       -Nanette Church,  Senior Regulatory Scientist, SJRWMD, 7/14/2017 Link to the SJRWMD permitting portal:       https://permitting.sjrwmd.com/epermitting/jsp/Search.do?theAction=searchDetail&permitNumber=146336  If you are opposed to signing on-line petitions, you can use the above link to comment directly to the SJRWMD.  It is very easy to do.  Regardless of the platform, our voices deserve to be heard!

Brent Brown
1,577 supporters
Update posted 22 hours ago

Petition to City of Dover New Hampshire

City of Dover, NH: Please Expand Organic Pilot Program

Starting in Spring 2015, the City of Dover, NH initiated a pilot program by beginning the process of managing two public spaces, lower Henry Law park and Sullivan Dr. ball field, organically. This is a tremendously positive first step. Along with hosting a municipal training session with Chip Osborne in Fall 2015, and eliminating the use of pollinator harming neonicotinoid class insecticides on school and city owned property, the City has made good progress in fulfilling the promises set out in the Sustainable Dover initiative. We wish to thank them for their efforts so far, and encourage the city to keep up the good work by expanding the program to include all city owned property, and eliminating toxic herbicide use for curbside vegetation control.  This is being done successfully elsewhere. Pesticide use effects all of us, and our children are especially vulnerable. Recently dozens of leading scientists and medical experts have created a call to action to reduce widespread exposures to chemicals that interfere with fetal and children’s brain development.  They state that "the current system in the United States for evaluating scientific evidence and making health-based decisions about environmental chemicals is fundamentally broken." It is imperative that we continue to move ahead in eliminating as much of these types of exposures as we can. Some of the products being used by the city contractors include... Mec Amine-D 3-way herbicide - (2,4 – d, Mecoprop-P, & Dicamba) 2,4 - d is a component of Vietnam defoliant Agent Orange, and it is contaminated with dioxin during the manufacturing process. The three active ingredients have never been tested in combination, only alone and never as a whole formulated product with 'inert' proprietary ingredients that comprise more than half. Acclaim - contains ingredients that are considered to be probable orsuspected human carcinogens, and may have target organ effects, or Quinclorac for post emergent crabgrass control to Soccer fields. Dimension - crabgrass pre-emergent herbicide Roundup Promax & Rodeo Herbicide - (glyphosate) Listed by the World Health Organization as a probable carcinogen, known to be genotoxic, which means it damages DNA in ways that can cause cancer, and shows endocrine disrupting activity at very low levels. Reward herbicide, active ingredient diquat dibromide. Residues of diquat have been found to persist in soil for many years with very little degradation. It doesn't have to be this way. As the home of the Children's Museum, the city of Dover receives many visitors. We have the opportunity to set an example for surrounding Seacoast communities by expanding the organic pilot programs to public areas still being conventionally treated, such as upper Henry Law park (pictured above), the public library, the McConnell Center, and many other spaces where children in particular frequent.  Not only is this program good for public and environmental health - but it also contributes to fiscal health by saving taxpayer money in the long term. Going forward, we ask that the City of Dover commits to stop using toxic pesticides in public places, to encourage organic property maintenance for all new developments, and to provide education to businesses and residents about organic property maintenance and least toxic alternatives for weed control.      

Non Toxic Dover NH
543 supporters