Topic

Coronavirus Worker Rights

227 petitions

Update posted 4 months ago

Petition to Andrew M. Cuomo, New York City Council, The Department for Health and Social Care, Environmental Protection Agency, Sewage Treatment Workers, Senior sewage treatment workers, NYC/NYS Residents, Alessandra Biaggi

Give Sewage Treatment Workers Hazardous Duty Pay and Unlimited Sick Time.

Sewage Treatment Workers (STWs), Senior Sewage Treatment Workers (SSTWs) and other Bureau of  Wastewater Treatment Workers for the DEP & BWT are Exposed to Raw Sewage and Wastewater which are inundated with Diseases and Pathogens on a Daily basis, Yet we only receive Only 6 sick days per year or 4 hours per month. We are not considered part of the “Uniformed” or “First Responders”, Yet We are responsible for Protecting the Public from the Disease and Pestilence that would wreak havoc on the public and communities in NYC and NYS. We provide Sustainable drinking water and Clean processed Wastewater back into the waterways, Once again protecting the Public and Wildlife. People Rarely think twice about what happens after they flush their toilet or what the Consequences and Repercussions would be if these Services were halted or interrupted (Even for a brief period)  We are currently on the front lines of the Covid19 battlefront every day. We once again have answered the call to shield the Public and put Ourselves and Our Families in harms way for the greater good of our fellow citizens. It’s time we are Truly considered “Essential” Employees. Help us make our voices heard by Voicing yours and signing this petition. Help us help You. - Thank You 

William Warren
4,296 supporters
Update posted 12 months ago

Petition to Bill Dodd, Gavin Newsom, DIane Feinstein, Kamala D. Harris, Mike Thompson

Armer Law; They take care of us. We need to take care of them.

Santa Rosa Police Detective Marylou Armer was denied COVID19 testing twice before she went into the emergency room, was put into a coma and died alone. Armer spent two weeks with a fever, aching body and shortness of breath. Armer asked twice to be tested for COVID-19. Armer was denied by Kaiser Permanente’s Vallejo Medical Center. She was not considered vulnerable because of her age and no underlying medical conditions. Armer was finally cleared to be tested on March 23, when her husband brought her to the emergency room. She was sedated, intubated, and placed in a medically induced coma. She died on March 31. Armer was with the Santa Rosa Police Department for 20 years and her death is devastating to all who worked with her to help victims of crimes that include domestic and dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, child abuse and elder abuse. But this is not an isolated incident. There have been several first responder deaths as a result of COVID-19 in the past few weeks – and there will be more. To date more than 20 law enforcement personnel alone, as well as nurses, doctors and firefighters have died from COVID 19.  Athletes and Celebrities, and those with money at their disposal have been getting tested when they have no symptoms. Marylou knew something was wrong and was denied access to healthcare that may have saved her life. "Armer Law" would allow that during any epidemic or pandemic, first responders which include but are not limited to; law enforcement, social workers, healthcare, and EMS workers, can NOT be denied testing, and should automatically be approved at the first sign of symptoms. They are on the front lines, entering people’s homes and having to make physical contact with the public, and they have the highest risk of exposure. Also provided would be regular, continued testing if necessary, and treatment covered by worker’s compensation, not sick leave. This death was preventable.  Our first responders take care of us, it is time to take care of them.   

Megan Berger
107,017 supporters
Update posted 1 year ago

Petition to President Robert Barchi, Board of Governors

We Are Not Disposable: Don’t Let Rutgers Purge Dedicated Teachers!

Monday, April 13, 2020 To President Barchi, the Board of Governors, and the broader Rutgers community: We Are Not Disposable: Don’t Let Rutgers Purge Dedicated Teachers On April 2nd, in response to the COVID-19 health crisis, Rutgers announced a hiring freeze for all employees, including its adjunct faculty (called Part-Time Lecturers or PTLs). As most PTL contracts must be renewed each semester, this “hiring freeze” could effectively amount to termination for many of Rutgers’ most valuable educators. Since April 2nd, top administrators have instructed some university deans to reduce PTL positions by as much as 25 percent, and to also make cuts to curricula. Administrators made these decisions unilaterally, without consulting the labor unions that represent the more than 20,000 workers essential to fulfilling Rutgers’ core mission. Why are administrators endangering the education of our students and threatening to harm the most vulnerable members of its faculty? In response to this outrageous and unfair policy, we, the undersigned, demand the following of the administration: Rescind the April 2nd policy announcing a PTL hiring freeze; Rescind any instructions to Deans to cut PTL hires by 20% or more.  Further, in light of the nature of the COVID-19 health emergency and its implications for the lives and well-being of Rutgers most vulnerable teachers: Immediately provide access to Rutgers health clinics for PTLs, and all other uninsured part-time employees at Rutgers, free of any charge; Provide compensation in the amount of $1,250 per course to PTLs who put in extra hours to rapidly transition to remote instruction; Cancel spring course evaluations because it is unfair to evaluate PTLs for teaching for courses that were transitioned to distance learning; Advance all qualified PTLs applying for promotion this semester (before June 1st), without “classroom” observation; and Recognize and empower a Rutgers Community COVID-19 Task Force in which all stakeholders—representatives of faculty and other Rutgers’ unions, student representatives, and community leaders—are equal partners in crisis response. Context: Rutgers employs roughly 3,000 PTLs statewide, who teach thousands of courses, and tens of thousands of students, every semester. Most PTLs make less than $5,500 per course with no benefits, and have worked overtime this spring without additional compensation for moving courses online. Cutting the number of PTLs not only weakens Rutgers’ primary institutional mission—to educate students—it also makes little financial sense. Reducing PTL courses by 20-25% will net less that $6 million in savings, perhaps far less. If Rutgers needs to save money, why not do what Stanford and other universities have done, and begin with temporary pay cuts for top administrators who have the highest salaries? For example, athletic coaches some of whom earn well over a million dollars, continue to draw salaries even while Rutgers sports are suspended. Additionally, there are 247 administrators at Rutgers who make more than $250,000 a year. Temporarily capping salaries at $250,000 could save $29 million. Further, there is no evidence that the university in fact faces any budgetary emergency. We know that Rutgers retains a “rainy day fund” totaling as much as $805 million, and that it will receive federal stimulus aid (around $55 million). Why not use these funds to ensure the quality education and protect some of the university’s most experienced teachers? Why look to layoff the lowest-paid faculty members, especially when alternative employment is likely to be severely limited due to hiring freezes at other universities? The COVID-19 pandemic is laying bare the inequities in our workforce and our workplaces. Rutgers PTLs stand together, and in solidarity with all members of the Rutgers community and beyond, whose jobs and well-being are threatened by this crisis, to say: “We are not disposable.” Together, we have the power to stop the university’s thoughtless efforts to manage this crisis on the backs of its most vulnerable employees. We, the undersigned, call upon the administration to do the right thing and respond quickly to this petition and its demands. The PTLFC-AAUP-AFT Executive Board Ann Alter Lauren Barbato Frank Bridges Roseli Golfetti Sheryl Goski Amy Higer David Letwin Paul More Heather Pierce Bryan Sacks Dan Sidorick Karen Thompson Alex Walter David Winters Deonca Williams

PTL Faculty Chapter, Rutgers AAUP-AFT
3,551 supporters
Update posted 2 years ago

Petition to Secretary of Transportation, Congress

Truckers are stepping up for America. Now, it's time for America to step up for truckers.

Over the past month, truckers have stepped up for America to ensure the supply chain stays intact during the 2020 COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic. They have done so at great personal effort, sacrifice and risk. American citizens, including teenagers and police officers, have, in turn, responded to truckers' plight and have tried to help truckers find food on the road to keep the deliveries coming. The government could be doing so much more --from providing testing locations that accommodate big rig trucks... to distributing masks... to dealing with Mega-brokers who are exploiting independent truckers during this difficult time and causing freight rates to drastically fall. We, the undersigned Americans, support America's 3.5 million truckers. We hereby petition the Secretary of Transportation to stand down on current public policy plans to replace truckers when this crisis is over by ushering in driverless trucks. That is not the way to #ThankATrucker after all truckers have done for America. We believe this planned obsolescence will not only eliminate driver jobs but will endanger the motoring public. We contend you cannot replace human judgment on the road, which is grounded in empathy, with artificial intelligence and autonomous machines. We also call for Congress to replace the current Federal motor carrier regulatory model.  For FY 2019, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) requested a $665.80 million budget from Congress, which included $284 million for Motor Carrier Safety Operations and Programs and $381.80 million for Motor Carrier Safety Grants. Over the past 20 years, this agency has been allocated over $5 billion for internal operations. Here is what American taxpayers have gotten in recent years for their money: *The 2018 Large Truck Occupant Highway Fatality Rate is at a 30-year high in the immediate aftermath of the onset of Electronic Logging Devices. Because truckers are regulated by the clock and paid by the mile Big Trucking induces truckers to speed to maximize productivity. Drivers should be paid a base salary plus performance incentives so they are not working under stress to avoid starvation. *When you do the math, 2.4 occupants of large trucks died every single day in 2018. *In 2017, 4,889 large trucks and buses were involved in fatal crashes, a 9-percent increase from 2016 (this has now been skewed to lower the percentage to 4.9% by removing certain vehicles, which, when combined with trailers still constitute a commercial motor vehicle over 10,000 lbs).** *The number of large trucks and buses in fatal crashes has increased by 42 percent from its low of 3,432 in 2009.** *From 2016 to 2017, large truck and bus fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled by all motor vehicles increased by 6.8 percent, from 0.146 to 0.156.** *There was a 40-percent increase in the number of fatal crashes involving large trucks or buses between 2009 and 2017. ** *From 2016 to 2017, the number of fatal crashes involving large trucks or buses increased by 8 percent.**  *The number of injury crashes involving large trucks or buses increased 62% from 2009 to 2015.** *From 2016 to 2017, according to NHTSA's CRSS data, large truck and bus injury crashes increased 4 percent (from 112,000 in 2016 to 116,000 in 2017).**  *From 2016 to 2017 the number of large trucks involved in fatal crashes increased 10 percent, from 4,251 to 4,657, and the large truck involvement rate (large trucks involved in fatal crashes per 100 million miles traveled by large trucks) increased 6 percent, from 1.48 to 1.56. The number of large trucks involved in injury crashes increased by 5 percent, from 102,000 to 107,000. The number of large trucks involved in property damage only crashes increased by 3 percent, from 351,000 to 363,000. The number of buses involved in fatal crashes decreased from 234 to 232, a decrease a mere 1 percent.** **SOURCE: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/safety/data-and-statistics/461861/ltcbf-2017-final-5-6-2019.pdf We now call on Congress to #SaveTruckers and specifically provide an economic stimulus package to #SaveSmallBusinessTruckers who are now on the verge of going out-of-business. Without same, America's supply chain will suffer a terrible capacity crisis when manufacturing spontaneously returns to full force and there are no longer sufficient trucks to service our supply needs.  Please save America's truckers from extinction and #MakeTheRoadsSafeAgain. MEDIA CONTACT: James@truckers.com

Small Business in Transportation Coalition
41,257 supporters