Topic

conservation

34 petitions

Update posted 1 week ago

Petition to UK government

Give automatic interim protection to buildings proposed for listing

Our built heritage is irreplaceable, and most people recognise its cultural and economic value. Listed buildings are given special protection by law, and it is a criminal offence to damage them, but current UK legislation offers no automatic interim protection to buildings which are under consideration for listing. As a result, over many years a long string of historic buildings have been destroyed or deliberately vandalised in order to prevent them being listed. Most famously the art Deco Firestone building in West London was bulldozed over a bank holiday weekend. Since then the same fate has befallen buildings ranging from important industrial heritage to ancient country pubs. More recently a rare and beautiful Jacobean ceiling in a former restaurant in Bristol was ripped out before it could be assessed for listing. It had survived the civil war. It had survived the industrial revolution. It had survived the Blitz and the depredations of 1960's town planning - only to be smashed to pieces as soon as it was put forward for listing.  If a local authority considers a building to be at special risk, they can choose to serve a Building Preservation Notice. But local authorities are reluctant to issue Building Preservation Notices, and often there is no prior reason to suspect that the owner will damage the building. Only a handful of BPN's are issued each year. Numerous organisations including The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, The Victorian Society, Bristol Heritage Forum and The Twentieth Century Society are calling for change to provide interim protection. In Wales buildings under consideration for listing are automatically given interim protection while their status is decided. But the UK parliament has failed to support similar legislation, which was previously proposed in 2008. If this legislation had been introduced when first proposed, many historic buildings might have been saved. The longer it takes to close this planning loophole, the more of our history and culture we will loose. I urge the UK government to amend the law to ensure that vulnerable historic buildings in the rest of the UK have the same protection as those in Wales. https://www.apollo-magazine.com/is-the-system-for-protecting-historic-buildings-working/ Draft 2008 Heritage Protection Bill: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/22858205/7349.pdf Historic Environment (Wales) Act 2016: http://cadw.gov.wales/historicenvironment/policy/historicenvironmentbill/?lang=en Firestone building: http://www.richmondandtwickenhamtimes.co.uk/news/626950.25_years_on___the_end_of_Firestone/ Sittingbourne Paper Mill and Blue Boys Inn:     https://cprekent.org.uk/news/standing-kents-built-heritage/ 15 Small Street, Bristol:             http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/01/historic-england-hits-roof-400-year-old-ceiling-torn-day-inspectors/ Carlton Tavern: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/environment/11525262/Bulldozers-level-historic-pub-the-day-before-it-is-due-to-be-listed.html  

Neil McKay
6,979 supporters
Update posted 4 weeks ago

Petition to Sheffield City Council, streetsahead@sheffield.gov.uk, David Wain

Save the 12 Trees on Rustlings Road, Sheffield

We, the undersigned, refute the assertion that the felling of Lime (Tilia sp.) trees on Rustlings Road is necessary. Instead, we demand, and believe it imperative, that sensitive engineering solutions (1) be adopted and implemented to enable the long-term retention of these trees. Evidence indicates that such large trees contribute significantly to local climate regulation (2), filtration of atmospheric pollutants (3), sustainable urban drainage (4), biodiversity (5), ecology (6): health and wellbeing (7) and amenity (8); through their beauty and our pleasure of its enjoyment, which enriches our lives. Twelve trees are marked for destruction, for 'damage to pavements'. We believe the damage is minor and does not significantly impair accessibility for disabled people, or the use of prams and pushchairs. It is our opinion that sensitive engineering solutions, such as pavement restructuring and localized remediation near trees, with kerb stones sculpted to accommodate root morphology, would represent a sustainable solution to perceived problems. Loss of these Lime trees would represent a significant loss of a valuable foraging resource for bees (honey from Lime flowers is much prized) and particularly for bats, as the Lime Leaf Aphid (Eucallipterus tiliae) – a favored prey item - only occurs on Lime trees. Lines could be painted on the road to prevent parking under trees, thereby minimizing the risk of damage to vehicles, to a level firmly within the “broadly acceptable region” of tolerability (9). Sub-veteran, mature trees, such as these Limes, represent our cultural heritage (10) and are irreplaceable. We demand that alternative, sensitive engineering solutions be implemented as an alternative to felling.           References: 1) Trees and Design Action Group. (2014) Trees in Hard Landscapes: A Guide for Delivery. TDAG http://www.tdag.org.uk/trees-in-hard-landscapes.html 2) Forestry Commission (2011). The UK Forestry Standard: The governments’ approach to sustainable forest management. 3rd ed. Edinburgh: Forestry Commission. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/ukfs 3) Karl, T., Harley, P., Emmons, L., Thornton, B., Guenther, A., Basu, C., & Jardine, K. (2010). Efficient atmospheric cleansing of oxidized organic trace gases by vegetation. Science, 330(6005), 816-819. http://www.sciencemag.org/content/330/6005/816.short Escobedo, F., Kroeger, T. & Wagner, J. (2011). Urban forests and pollution mitigation: analyzing ecosystem services and disservices. Environmental Pollution, Volume 159, pp. 2078-2087. http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?cluster=14928633190131047233&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5 4) Trees and Design Action Group (2012). Trees in the Townscape: A Guide for Decision Makers, s.l.: Trees and Design Action Group. http://www.tdag.org.uk/trees-in-the-townscape.html Construction Industry Research and Information Association, 2013. CIRIA Research Project RP993: Demonstrating the multiple benefits of SuDS – A business case (Phase 2). Draft Literature Review. [Online] Available at: http://www.susdrain.org [Accessed 25 May 2015]. http://www.susdrain.org/files/resources/ciria_guidance/ciria_rp993_literature_review_october_2013_.pdf 5) Ewers, R. M., & Didham, R. K. (2006). Confounding factors in the detection of species responses to habitat fragmentation. Biological Reviews, 81(01), p. 117-142. http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?cluster=1003233194462145743&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5 Gilbert‐Norton, L., Wilson, R., Stevens, J. R., & Beard, K. H. (2010). A Meta‐Analytic Review of Corridor Effectiveness. Conservation Biology, 24(3), p. 660-668. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01450.x/full 6) Gonzalez, A., Rayfield, B., & Lindo, Z. (2011). The disentangled bank: how loss of habitat fragments and disassembles ecological networks. American Journal of Botany, 98(3), p. 503-516. http://www.amjbot.org/content/98/3/503.full 7) Sarajevs, V. (2011). Health Benefits of Street Trees, Farnham: Forest Research. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/fr/INFD-8JCEJH Williams, K., O'Brien, L. & Stewart, A.. (2013). Urban health and urban forestry: how can forest management agencies help?. Arboricultural Journal: The International Journal of Urban Forestry, Volume 35, pp. 119-133. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03071375.2013.852358 8) Shackell, A. & Walter, R. (2012). Greenspace Design For Health And Well-being, Edinburgh: Forestry Commission. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/PDF/FCPG019.pdf/$FILE/FCPG019.pdf Velarde, M., Fry, G. & Tveit, M. (2007). Health effects of viewing landscapes – Landscape types in environmental psychology. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, Volume 6, p. 199-212. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866707000416 9) The National Tree Safety Group. (2011). Common Sense Risk Management of Trees: Guidance on trees and public safety in the UK for owners, managers and advisers. Forestry Commission Stock Code: FCMS024 ed. Edinburgh: Forestry Commission. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/website/publications.nsf/searchpub/?SearchView&Query=(FCMS024)&SearchOrder=4&SearchMax=0&SearchWV=TRUE&SearchThesaurus=TRUE 10) de Groot, R., Alkemade, J., Braat, L. & Hein, L. (2010). Challenges in integrating the concept of ecosystem services and values in landscape planning, management and decision making. Ecological Complexity, Volume 7, p. 260–272. http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?cluster=17957884838351513211&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5

Deepa Shetty
7,789 supporters
Update posted 4 weeks ago

Petition to His Excellency Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo

Atewa Forest for National Park – not mining

(Español) The Government of Ghana must declare Atewa Forest a National Park, to protect it from bauxite mining. Atewa Forest is the finest example of Upland Evergreen Forest in the Upper Guinean Forest region: its altitude causes a distinctive type of vegetation to grow that is extremely rare and very rich in species, including: 18 species classified as Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable by the IUCN, such as the Togo Slippery Frog Conraua derooi; At least 50 species of mammals, including the recently discovered White-naped Mangabey Cercocebus lunulatus which is Critically Endangered; Over 1,000 species of plants and 230 species of birds, including the Nimba Flycatcher Melaenornis annamarulae found nowhere else in Ghana; Over 570 species of butterflies already recorded, out of potentially 700 species – which would make Atewa the richest forest for butterflies in West Africa. In our report to the Government of Ghana with support from IUCN Netherlands, we demonstrate the forest’s enormous importance to the water supply of five million people in Accra, and make a compelling economic case for protecting Atewa Forest as a National Park. But the Government is planning to let Chinese companies mine the bauxite deposits found in the hilltops of Atewa Forest – these are spread over a wide area, and would require the forest to be removed. The resulting barren landscape would be impossible to restore to its former condition. Atewa as a National Park would be a lasting, positive legacy for the Government of Ghana. This option has great public support amongst forest edge communities, and would honour Ghana’s commitment to the international Convention on Biological Diversity and to the Sustainable Development Goals. This is in stark contrast to the loss that would be experienced should the hills be mined. We need your help! Please sign the petition, and tell your friends to sign it as well. Visit arocha.org/atewa for more info and more options for action.

A Rocha International
5,898 supporters