36 petitions

Update posted 3 weeks ago

Petition to Newcastle City Council

Save Havannah Nature Reserve's Red Squirrels

Havannah Nature Reserve is the last known site of breeding red squirrels in Newcastle - the only city in England with an urban population of this legally protected species - but proposals for hundreds of houses directly opposite now threaten this essential breeding ground. Land around the reserve currently acts as a buffer between grey and red squirrels but hundreds of houses with gardens will encourage grey squirrels – which carry the deadly poxvirus and outcompete reds for food.  If the plans are approved grey squirrels would quickly colonise the reserve, killing the red population.  The only way to save Havannah’s reds would then be a grey culling programme, which many do not agree with, so it would be difficult to enforce. It would also be difficult to implement, as grey traps would likely be vandalized. Havannah Nature Reserve provides optimum red squirrel habitat, thanks to dense areas of pine trees - an ideal food source for red squirrels. The reserve is one of only two lowland heaths in Newcastle and provides habitat for other protected species, such as Great Crested Newt, badgers, bats and the increasingly rare Dingy Skipper butterfly. Increased predation from domestic cats and dogs will severely disrupt the rich biodiversity of this important wildlife habitat. There have already been over 450 objections to the plans. Please help the reds in their hour of need and sign the petition to send the message to Newcastle City Council that building here is just not on.

Save Newcastle Wildlife
16,851 supporters
Update posted 3 weeks ago

Petition to Enfield Local Authority

PROTECT the Green Belt Land and the wildlife on Enfield Road

GREEN BELT LAND AND WILDLIFE UNDER THREAT Fairview New Homes are proposing to build on Green Belt land on Enfield Road (EN2 7HX). For many years this land has been used for grazing horses and is the habitat for a wide variety of wildlife, including hedgehogs, bats, muntjac deer, pheasants, owls, woodpeckers and many species of birds. It also contains beautiful specimens of ancient oak trees and hedgerows. THIS IS ALL NOW UNDER THREAT. Local residents, The Enfield Society, The Western Enfield Residents Association, Campaign for Rural England, The London Green Belt Council, Local Ward Councillors believe that Enfield should retain its Green Belt land and the wildlife that live there. Any threats by developers should be fought by local people and those that care about the natural environment. This land is Green Belt and an Area of Special Character as detailed and confirmed by Enfield Council.  Forming part of the Merryhills Brook Valley extending down to Boxer’s Lake and its Green Chain link, it performs an important function extending the Green Belt up to the urban edge and creating a separation between Slades Hill (World’s End) and Oakwood.  This forms an important and valuable connection passing through the Green Belt.  Enfield Road Watch, an action group committee has been formed to oversee things on behalf of residents and the wider community concerned about this proposal, along with the other Societies and Associations mentioned For more information please visit our website at: Follow us on twitter: Follow and like us on Facebook: Thank you for your support and together we can make a difference! Enfield RoadWatch Action Group  

EnfieldRoadWatch Action Group
7,694 supporters
Update posted 3 weeks ago

Petition to His Excellency Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo

Atewa Forest for National Park – not mining

(Español • français • português) The Government of Ghana must declare Atewa Forest a National Park, to protect it from bauxite mining. Atewa Forest is the finest example of Upland Evergreen Forest in the Upper Guinean Forest region: its altitude causes a distinctive type of vegetation to grow that is extremely rare and very rich in species, including: Over 70 species classified as Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable by the IUCN, such as the Togo Slippery Frog Conraua derooi; At least 50 species of mammals, including the recently discovered White-naped Mangabey Cercocebus lunulatus which is Critically Endangered; Over 1,000 species of plants and 230 species of birds, including the Nimba Flycatcher Melaenornis annamarulae found nowhere else in Ghana; Over 570 species of butterflies already recorded, out of potentially 700 species – which would make Atewa the richest forest for butterflies in West Africa. In our report to the Government of Ghana with support from IUCN Netherlands, we demonstrate the forest’s enormous importance to the water supply of five million people in Accra, and make a compelling economic case for protecting Atewa Forest as a National Park. But the Government is planning to let Chinese companies mine the bauxite deposits found in the hilltops of Atewa Forest – these are spread over a wide area, and would require the forest to be removed. The resulting barren landscape would be impossible to restore to its former condition. Atewa as a National Park would be a lasting, positive legacy for the Government of Ghana. This option has great public support amongst forest edge communities, and would honour Ghana’s commitment to the international Convention on Biological Diversity and to the Sustainable Development Goals. This is in stark contrast to the loss that would be experienced should the hills be mined. We need your help! Please sign the petition, and tell your friends to sign it as well. Visit for more info and more options for action.

A Rocha International
10,402 supporters