Topic

climate change

53 petitions

Update posted 3 hours ago

Petition to Sheffield City Council, streetsahead@sheffield.gov.uk, David Wain

Save the 12 Trees on Rustlings Road, Sheffield

We, the undersigned, refute the assertion that the felling of Lime (Tilia sp.) trees on Rustlings Road is necessary. Instead, we demand, and believe it imperative, that sensitive engineering solutions (1) be adopted and implemented to enable the long-term retention of these trees. Evidence indicates that such large trees contribute significantly to local climate regulation (2), filtration of atmospheric pollutants (3), sustainable urban drainage (4), biodiversity (5), ecology (6): health and wellbeing (7) and amenity (8); through their beauty and our pleasure of its enjoyment, which enriches our lives. Twelve trees are marked for destruction, for 'damage to pavements'. We believe the damage is minor and does not significantly impair accessibility for disabled people, or the use of prams and pushchairs. It is our opinion that sensitive engineering solutions, such as pavement restructuring and localized remediation near trees, with kerb stones sculpted to accommodate root morphology, would represent a sustainable solution to perceived problems. Loss of these Lime trees would represent a significant loss of a valuable foraging resource for bees (honey from Lime flowers is much prized) and particularly for bats, as the Lime Leaf Aphid (Eucallipterus tiliae) – a favored prey item - only occurs on Lime trees. Lines could be painted on the road to prevent parking under trees, thereby minimizing the risk of damage to vehicles, to a level firmly within the “broadly acceptable region” of tolerability (9). Sub-veteran, mature trees, such as these Limes, represent our cultural heritage (10) and are irreplaceable. We demand that alternative, sensitive engineering solutions be implemented as an alternative to felling.           References: 1) Trees and Design Action Group. (2014) Trees in Hard Landscapes: A Guide for Delivery. TDAG http://www.tdag.org.uk/trees-in-hard-landscapes.html 2) Forestry Commission (2011). The UK Forestry Standard: The governments’ approach to sustainable forest management. 3rd ed. Edinburgh: Forestry Commission. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/ukfs 3) Karl, T., Harley, P., Emmons, L., Thornton, B., Guenther, A., Basu, C., & Jardine, K. (2010). Efficient atmospheric cleansing of oxidized organic trace gases by vegetation. Science, 330(6005), 816-819. http://www.sciencemag.org/content/330/6005/816.short Escobedo, F., Kroeger, T. & Wagner, J. (2011). Urban forests and pollution mitigation: analyzing ecosystem services and disservices. Environmental Pollution, Volume 159, pp. 2078-2087. http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?cluster=14928633190131047233&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5 4) Trees and Design Action Group (2012). Trees in the Townscape: A Guide for Decision Makers, s.l.: Trees and Design Action Group. http://www.tdag.org.uk/trees-in-the-townscape.html Construction Industry Research and Information Association, 2013. CIRIA Research Project RP993: Demonstrating the multiple benefits of SuDS – A business case (Phase 2). Draft Literature Review. [Online] Available at: http://www.susdrain.org [Accessed 25 May 2015]. http://www.susdrain.org/files/resources/ciria_guidance/ciria_rp993_literature_review_october_2013_.pdf 5) Ewers, R. M., & Didham, R. K. (2006). Confounding factors in the detection of species responses to habitat fragmentation. Biological Reviews, 81(01), p. 117-142. http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?cluster=1003233194462145743&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5 Gilbert‐Norton, L., Wilson, R., Stevens, J. R., & Beard, K. H. (2010). A Meta‐Analytic Review of Corridor Effectiveness. Conservation Biology, 24(3), p. 660-668. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01450.x/full 6) Gonzalez, A., Rayfield, B., & Lindo, Z. (2011). The disentangled bank: how loss of habitat fragments and disassembles ecological networks. American Journal of Botany, 98(3), p. 503-516. http://www.amjbot.org/content/98/3/503.full 7) Sarajevs, V. (2011). Health Benefits of Street Trees, Farnham: Forest Research. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/fr/INFD-8JCEJH Williams, K., O'Brien, L. & Stewart, A.. (2013). Urban health and urban forestry: how can forest management agencies help?. Arboricultural Journal: The International Journal of Urban Forestry, Volume 35, pp. 119-133. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03071375.2013.852358 8) Shackell, A. & Walter, R. (2012). Greenspace Design For Health And Well-being, Edinburgh: Forestry Commission. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/PDF/FCPG019.pdf/$FILE/FCPG019.pdf Velarde, M., Fry, G. & Tveit, M. (2007). Health effects of viewing landscapes – Landscape types in environmental psychology. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, Volume 6, p. 199-212. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1618866707000416 9) The National Tree Safety Group. (2011). Common Sense Risk Management of Trees: Guidance on trees and public safety in the UK for owners, managers and advisers. Forestry Commission Stock Code: FCMS024 ed. Edinburgh: Forestry Commission. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/website/publications.nsf/searchpub/?SearchView&Query=(FCMS024)&SearchOrder=4&SearchMax=0&SearchWV=TRUE&SearchThesaurus=TRUE 10) de Groot, R., Alkemade, J., Braat, L. & Hein, L. (2010). Challenges in integrating the concept of ecosystem services and values in landscape planning, management and decision making. Ecological Complexity, Volume 7, p. 260–272. http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?cluster=17957884838351513211&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5

Deepa Shetty
7,671 supporters
Update posted 2 days ago

Petition to Prime Minister and Leader of Government Business - RT. Hon. Ruhakana Rugunda, The Speaker of Parliament of Uganda - RT. Hon. Rebecca Alitwala Kadaga, Uganda Minister of Water and Environment - Hon. Cheptoris Sam

Enact a Fair and Equitable Climate Change Law for Uganda

As you are aware, Uganda has already witnessed some of the negative effects of climate change, and many more are expected to impact the country. The major manifestations of climate change in Uganda include: severe water shortages; increased incidents of drought; reduced crop production especially the value of the Arabica and Robusta coffee crop which could fall by half by 2050 due to the contraction of the area that can support its production – with the cost of the associated losses from the fall in production estimated at US$ 1, 235 million; reduced potential for hydropower development due to a reduction in rainfall and water availability – with the decline estimated at 26% by 2050; and damage to the country’s physical infrastructure due to extreme weather events, with losses estimated at 0.1–0.4% of Uganda’s GDP in 2050 (Ministry of Water and Environment, 2017). The impact of climate change on Uganda is also manifested by the declining surface area of the Rwenzori ice caps which has reduced by 49 percent between 1987 and 2003, and is projected to disappear within the next two decades. Thus, adaptation and mitigation action is required in all major sectors of the economy including: agriculture; energy; health; transport and physical infrastructure; and water. A proposed National Climate Change law (now a bill) is expected to accelerate Uganda’s efforts to undertake adaptation and mitigation action across all the key sectors of the Ugandan economy. Since the draft National Climate Change Bill, 2017 came out at the end of July 2017 for public review, the Climate Change Department in collaboration with different stakeholders have held several meetings involving Government Departments and Agencies; Civil Society Organizations; Private sector; Members of Parliament through the Parliamentary Forum on Climate Change, among others. According to Mr Chebet Maikut - Commissioner of the Climate Change Department in the Ministry of Water and Environment, 'The proposed climate change law is deemed crucial in filling up the existing gaps in sectoral laws enacted by Parliament of Uganda'. Equally, CSOs are optimistic that the proposed law will create a clear regulatory framework where all the actors in Uganda are obliged to collectively  and individually take up climate change adaptation and mitigation actions. In advancing the concerns already expressed by civil society on this draft climate change bill, we would like to petition you and other relevant law makers - that when this important Bill comes before the floor of Parliament of Uganda, the following specific glaring equitable and fairness related gaps must be addressed: Under the proposed National Climate Change Advisory Committee, wider representation is needed to include in the membership of the committee, a representative of the youth, a representative of cultural and traditional institutions. Therefore membership of the committee should be increased to include: Representative from National Youth council, Ministry of Education and Sports and Ministry of Gender Labour & Social Development. The draft Bill requires the Climate Change Department to prepare an annual report on climate change for consideration by Cabinet and Parliament and provides the major contents for that report. It is important that among the contents, there should be a specific section detailing special measures and initiatives carried out to make the most vulnerable communities and persons resilient to effects of climate change it is proposed that Uganda’s CC law should establish an annual multi-stakeholder climate change platform at both the national and district local governments for mutual accountability between duty bearers and the general public. These forums would also be very important in terms of promoting public participation in decision-making and access to climate change information. However, an elaboration of this should be done as much as possible to uphold this important step towards promoting sustainable development in Uganda (for example, a schedule on composition of the multi-stakeholder forum). The draft Bill is weak with respect to the question of public participation in climate change decision-making. To be progressive, Uganda’s climate change law should make it possible for the public to challenge decisions taken where there has not been meaningful participation. Similarly in relation to the Right to petition court in defense of climate change adaptation and mitigation, Uganda’s climate change law should provide for the right of any person to apply to court where a person or entity has acted in a manner that has or is likely to adversely affect efforts towards mitigation and adaptation to the effects of climate change. A failure to address the above gaps will imply Business as Usual where citizens, communities, groups, private sector and legislators will NOT be in position to among others: promote robust measures to enhance public participation and accountability; impose  the much needed duty on local governments to mainstream climate change in their policies, plans and budgets;  require all the key sectors of Uganda's economy to implement climate change adaptation and mitigation plans through mobilization of the requisite resources.  

Uganda Coalition for Sustainable Development
55 supporters
Update posted 3 days ago

Petition to Old Chang Kee, Polar Puffs

Tell Old Chang Kee & Polar Puffs to stop frying our rainforests

We have a simple but urgent request for Old Chang Kee and Polar Puffs to pave the way for a better Singapore and an improved World - by using cooking oil that does not cause deforestation and haze. 1. We are young students of Singapore, SOS (Students Of Singapore) Against Haze.  Like many of you, we enjoy curry puffs from Old Chang Kee and Polar Puffs. However, these curry puff don’t seem to taste quite as good once we discovered that the cooking oil they use is causing haze.  Deforestation for unsustainable palm oil is devastating the lives of indigenous forest people and threatens species-much of it for producing palm oil. Once rainforests have been cleared, fires rage across the dry landscape, causing the choking haze across the region including Singapore.         Last year, we saw with our own eyes forests burning in Sumatra, Indonesia. We used to visit that place nearly every year to trek and raft. But what was once lush green rainforests have turned into vast oil palm plantations, and with many areas shrouded in thick smoke. We recently learnt that both Old Chang Kee and Polar Puffs use palm oil that originates from potentially unsustainable plantations and supply chains.  Cooking oil tins at Old Chang Kee clearly state that the palm oil originates from unsustainable sources.  A discussion with Polar Puffs also revealed that they use palm oil from unsustainable sources. That said, the iconic Singaporean curry puff can be prepared with palm oil produced in a sustainable way that protects rainforests and the local communities and ecosystems. Palm oil certified by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) is already widely available, and we have a list of suppliers that can supply RSPO-certified cooking oil. In fact, many companies such as VeganBurg, Grain, Sodexo, IKEA and Singapore Zoo are already sourcing certified sustainable cooking oil. 2. Unfortunately our efforts to reach out to Old Chang Kee and Polar Puffs have been in vain. Multiple emails, calls and even a visit to Old Chang Kee’s headquarters were ignored. Polar Puffs believes that sustainable palm oil is too expensive, which is not the case. 3. Therefore, we had no choice but to create this. Old Chang Kee and Polar Puffs will listen to you, their customers, because they depend on you. We want Old Chang Kee and Polar Puffs to be local brands we can be proud of, and become pioneers of a sustainable food industry. Your action matters. Show Old Chang Kee and Polar Puffs that they have a responsibility to stand for the values that Singaporeans hold dearly. SOS (Students of Singapore) Against Haze  

SOS Against Haze
4,796 supporters