Topic

celebrities

2 petitions

Started 4 months ago

Petition to Alma Adams

Put an End to Degrading Television Programs and Media Aimed at Young Impressionable Girls

Proper Censorship and Regulation of Degrading Television Programs and Media [Aimed at Young Impressionable Girls] ------------------------------------------- Contrary to the beliefs of some, it sure does take a village to raise a child. However, what are the potential results of being raised by a village that sends out destructive messages? In these days of social media, young impressionable minds – especially the minds of our young impressionable girls enticed by likes, views, and WorldstarHipHop content – bypass parental controls, having 24/7 handheld access to self-destructive content such as bloodshed and explicit music lyrics and imagery. It’s very telling of the times we live in, when it is clearly acceptable to present – to the people via social media platforms – bottomless nudes to promote ‘SlutWalk’ campaigns; music videos such as self-proclaimed ‘Bad Girl’ Rhianna’s ‘Needed Me’, ‘Pour it Up’, ‘Bitch Better Have My Money’; Nicki Minaj’s ‘Anaconda’; and Lily Allen’s ‘Hard Out Here’, to name a few. TV pilots [that can be accessed via YouTube and many other websites] such as ‘All my Babies’ Mamas’ [cancelled by petition] and most recently, ‘The Real Side Chicks of Charlotte’, have only added to the roster of extremely popular ‘ratchet TV’, which includes shows such as ‘Bad Girls Club’, ‘Basketball Wives’, ‘Love and HipHop’, and UK’s ‘Celebrity Big Brother’, among others. Who do you think are their target audiences? All communities, but especially ‘minority’ or ‘inner city’ communities, should take a stand against any television programming, mainstream media, and pop culture content that degrades humanity by promoting and glamorizing dysfunctional self-destructive behaviour. This includes stripper and gang culture: lewd conduct, promiscuity, infidelity, adultery, single parenthood, drug use, violence, materialism, and other behaviours signifying total degradation. For these behaviours are not without ramifications. With the accessibility of the Internet, this is not just an American or British social issue. I’m certain that such social issues affect all cultures across the globe. But, as a British citizen with an American cultural background, I can confirm that British culture is indeed influenced by American culture, especially through today’s mainstream media and pop culture, and this includes American celebrity pop ‘icons’ such as Nicki Minaj, Beyoncé, Rihanna, Kanye West, and Kim Kardashian, just to name a few. Celebrities are ‘made’. They are powerful ‘tools’ to influence and to sell not only products, but also agendas and lifestyles. Prominent icons such as Megan Fox, Madonna, and the late Steve Jobs have been quoted on their stance on today’s technology, media, and pop culture, that is, they try to keep their children away from television, media publications, and particular gadgets in their homes. Is it perhaps because they and their teams know the power of their celebrityhood and questionable means of promotion? Hmmm, something to make one think. We too as communities must adopt a similar stance, understand, and open our eyes to the damaging effects and influence of today’s mainstream media and pop culture. If it’s not easy to restrict television use in your home or throw out the television altogether. We must demand to see positive imagery, relationships, and portrayals of togetherness for us and the young impressionable minds to emulate and to aspire to. This can be done by writing letters to the authorities in charge of broadcasting in our areas, petitioning television networks ourselves, and so on.  By signing this petition, let our voice be heard. Let us show our non-support for destructive mainstream and pop culture media content that perpetuates dysfunction, self-destruction and the breakdown of our communities. Our city leaders will not listen to our voice without the unity and support of the collective community!

C Cutler
11 supporters