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227 petitions

Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, President of the United States

UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). December 18th, 2009, marks the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the treaty by the United Nations, and while 186 countries have ratified the convention, the United States remains one of only seven countries in the world that have not. Ratification of the treaty is critical and urgent for continuing progress on women's and girls' rights in this nation and for bolstering efforts to support and advance women's rights as well as democracy, liberty, civil rights, universal human rights, dignity, and well being worldwide. Ratifying CEDAW would strengthen and advance the US Constitution, US leadership, this nation values, the common goods, and humanity goodness and virtues.   http://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-declaration-on-universal-human-rightshttp://www.change.org/petitions/united-nations-human-rights-defenders-declarationhttp://www.change.org/petitions/include-the-universal-declaration-of-human-rights-on-passportshttp://www.change.org/petitions/un-convention-on-the-rights-of-the-older-personshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-international-covenant-on-economic-social-and-cultural-rightshttp://www.change.org/petitions/convention-on-the-protection-of-the-rights-of-all-migrant-workers-and-members-of-their-familieshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-with-disabilitieshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-declaration-on-the-rights-of-indigenous-peopleshttp://www.change.org/petitions/the-united-nations-convention-on-the-rights-of-the-childhttp://www.change.org/petitions/global-well-being-index-better-life-index-for-the-common-good-and-well-being

Vu Nguyen
349 supporters
Update posted 2 weeks ago

Petition to U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, President of the United States

Ratify UN Optional Protocol on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)

Despite the adoption of The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) treaty approximately 32 years ago by the United Nations, and while at least 186 countries have ratified the convention, the United States remains one of only few nations in the world that have not. Ratification of the treaty is critical and urgent for continuing progress on women's and girls' rights in this nation and for bolstering efforts to support and advance women's rights as well as democracy, liberty, civil rights, universal human rights, dignity, and well being worldwide. Ratifying CEDAW and CEDAW Optional Protocol would strengthen and advance the US Constitution, US leadership, this nation values, the greater and common goods, and humanity decency and goodness. The Optional Protocol Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women contains two procedures: A communications procedure allows individual women, or groups of women, to submit claims of violations of rights protected under the Convention to the Committee. The Protocol also creates an inquiry procedure enabling the Committee to initiate inquiries into situations of grave or systematic violations of women’s rights. Ratification of the treaties are critical and urgent for continuing progress on women’s and girls’ rights in this nation and for bolstering efforts to support and advance women’s rights as well as democracy, liberty, civil rights, universal human rights, dignity, and well being worldwide.   Link to UN treaties: http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=IND&mtdsg_no=IV-8&chapter=4〈=en http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=IND&mtdsg_no=IV-8-b&chapter=4〈=en http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/cedaw/protocol/    

Vu Nguyen
65 supporters
Started 3 weeks ago

Petition to New York Times, laura collins-hughes

Stop body shaming in the press.

Recently, a problem arose among a certain critic for the New York Times. This critic, Laura Collins-Hughes, shared her particular thoughts on Smokey Joe’s Cafe, an off-broadway show. Of one of the actresses in the show, Alysha Umphress, Collins- Hughes wrote, “Ms. Umphress, by the way, is bigger than the other women onstage, and the costume designer, Alejo Vietti, doesn’t seem to have known how to work with that, dressing her in an unnecessarily unflattering way. He does better with the skimpy, yet not overly revealing, pink fringe outfit Emma Degerstedt wears, and jiggles in, for the leering number ‘Teach Me How to Shimmy.’” The review sparked attention from a wide audience, including some Broadway actors and actresses. Barrett Wilbert Weed, who currently plays Janice Sarkisian in Mean Girls, posted a response on her Instagram page.  "...The reason I read this review is because an actress and a friend I care about was spoken about incorrectly in it. Not subjectively incorrectly, Just objectively completely wrong... This review spent maybe half a sentence talking about her talent and then went on to talk about her body. Frankly, discussing anyone’s body in a review about their talent is laughable to me. It is hilariously ten years ago and I think we have recently gained a lot of self awareness about how inappropriate it is to comment on woman’s figure when she’s trying to perform for you. Alysha’s body was mentioned in conjunction with a slight to the costume designer of Smokey Joe’s, but it just didn’t need to be mentioned. It is the very definition of stirring the pot or dragging a show through the mud. It’s low brow. It’s beneath our industry and beneath the author... Mind you, this reviewer didn’t call into question how beautiful my friend is. What she DID do is spend more time talking about how my friend looks in her costume than talking about how talented, special, vocally gifted, and different she is. And that is the problem with this review. It was written by a woman. If we want to stop being objectified, we need to stop objectifying... What’s more? I think she looks great in her costume :) And that’s my review of this review and of my sweet friend Alysha. The End." In addition, Alysha Umphress herself replied to the critic, stating, "It's shocking to see a woman (especially a woman whose social media would suggest she is pro woman) body shame an actress who isn't size 0 and praise one that is. Her wording wasn't constructive. It was full on mean girl. It's 2018. We should be celebrating women's diversity in the arts, not shaming them, by the way, for being the biggest of all girls. And while her overall point was to malign the costume designer, her phrasing made me the sacrificial "fat" lamb. Truly disappointed and saddened by her ugly and pointless description. Also, I think I look pretty ferosh." Unbelievably so, the critic has only countered by tweeting, "My issue was with a particular costume. It was on a human body. I said nothing negative about anyone's body." This issue is not okay. Body shaming should not be allowed. A study shows that 94% of female teenagers have been body shamed and 65% of male teenagers. I propose that body shaming should be banned in the press.  Reviews aren't the only source of body shaming comments. Models, actresses, actors, singers, and everyone else can be body shamed. By signing this petition, we can bring attention to this cause and hopefully reduce the amount of body shaming in today’s world.    

Abigail Lev
33 supporters