Commissioner, Conn. Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection: End Crow Hunting in Connecticut
  • Petitioned Daniel C. Esty

This petition was delivered to:

Commissioner, Conn. Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection
Daniel C. Esty
Bureau Chief, Bureau of Natural Resources, CT DEEP
William Hyatt
Deputy Commissioner, Outdoor Recreation and Natural Resources, CT DEEP
Susan K. Whalen
Director, Wildlife Divison, CT DEEP
Richard Jacobson

Commissioner, Conn. Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection: End Crow Hunting in Connecticut

    1. Michael Westerfield
    2. Petition by

      Michael Westerfield

      Willimantic, CT

Crow hunting is legal in Connecticut and the regulations of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection reflect the traditional belief among “sportsmen”  that crows are “varmints” and may be treated as such by hunters. The crow is considered in the Connecticut hunting regulations to be an “upland game bird”, but unlike other birds in this category, there is no limit on the number of crows that a hunter can kill, either on a day or for the season. Crow hunting season is also longer than for the other upland game birds and, unlike all other birds in any category, electronic calling devices may be used to lure crows to hunters, and rifles, handguns, and shotguns holding more than three shells may be used to kill them.

Open season on crows in Connecticut is January 1 through February 28 and October 19 through December 31.

Apparently no one knows how many persons in Connecticut hunt crows or how many of the birds they kill, individually or collectively. There are no reporting requirements and it appears that no records or statistics are kept. Recent studies including one produced by the Outdoor Industry Association, however, have shown that hunting in America as a whole has declined tremendously in popularity compared to other forms of outdoor recreation, being rated lowest in spending, jobs created, popularity and all other categories considered when compared with nine other activities. Other statistics show that in Connecticut only one percent of the population hunts any species of mammal or bird. Anecdotal evidence indicates that there are few, if any, persons in Connecticut who would consider themselves primarily as crow hunters and that crows are shot for target practice because they are considered intelligent and challenging, during times when no other hunting season is open, or if one just happens to be in an area where a hunter is shooting. Some “sportsmen” hate and/or fear crows and will shoot them on sight, in or out of season. It is doubtful if anyone has ever been prosecuted for killing crows out of season.

For all of the above reasons, the economic impact of ending crow hunting in Connecticut would be virtually nonexistent, limited to the price of the shells actually fired at the birds. No special license fees are involved and it is doubtful if anyone buys guns or other equipment, other than possibly calling devices, specifically for hunting crows. It is probable that the total yearly amount expended specifically on crow hunting in Connecticut is no more than $50,000.00 and probably much less, out of an outdoor recreation economy valued at $6,900,000,000.00 for the state in consumer spending alone.

We maintain that allowing crow hunting in Connecticut was a serious mistake which must be corrected. There is increasing scientific evidence that the crows are highly-intelligent animals, possessing a complex language and culture, capable of making and using tools, and possessing sophisticated problem solving abilities. Studies have also demonstrated that crows provide great benefits to agriculture and public health through their predation on numerous pest species and consumption of carrion. The recent great mortality among crows, estimated to be as much as 50% of the continental population, caused by the West Nile virus clearly indicated that even a numerous and adaptable species is at risk in this era of climate change and worldwide spread of diseases and should not be wantonly slaughtered for sport.
There is no real justification for allowing the practice of killing crows to continue, and we believe that killing of any living creature for no reason other than personal enjoyment should always be strongly discouraged. We therefore petition that the hunting regulations of the State of Connecticut be amended to prohibit the sport hunting of crows within the State, to eliminate the open seasons for crows, and to remove all references to crow hunting from all regulations and publications of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection.
For more information about the initiative to end crow hunting or crows in general, please visit www.crows.net.

To:
Daniel C. Esty, Commissioner, Conn. Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection
William Hyatt, Bureau Chief, Bureau of Natural Resources, CT DEEP
Susan K. Whalen, Deputy Commissioner, Outdoor Recreation and Natural Resources, CT DEEP
Richard Jacobson, Director, Wildlife Divison, CT DEEP
End Crow Hunting in Connecticut

Sincerely,
[Your name]

Recent signatures

    News

    1. Reached 750 signatures
    2. Quiet Time for Connecticut Crows

      Michael Westerfield
      Petition Organizer

      It’s quiet time for crows in Connecticut. The mated pairs have built their nests and are incubating eggs or feeding very young nestlings. During this period crows are very quiet and secretive, trying not to draw predators to their vulnerable nests. Oftentimes folks may think that their local crows have vanished, but in a short time the normal crow vocalizations will resume and then, as we roll into summer, the fledglings will begin to turn up feeding with their parents.

      Quiet time for crows also translates into quiet time for the crows.net website and a slow down on petition signatures. If folks don’t hear crows, they tend to forget about them. Yet if we are going to save crows from the hunters, we must never let our efforts slacken. I encourage you to renew your efforts to get the petition out to your friends and contacts and to visit the crows.net website to learn more about these fascinating creatures. We also have a very well received book about all aspects of the life hist

      Introduction to crows.net

      The language and culture of the American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos. All about crows.

    3. If you care about crows

      Michael Westerfield
      Petition Organizer

      Our petition to end crow hunting in Connecticut started off well, but the initial flood of signatures has now slowed down to a trickle. While this might not be the most glamorous environmental campaign compared to saving wolves, whales, or baby seals, it is one that I think we can actually win, if folks who care about crows each put a relatively small amount of time into the effort. I am asking everyone who has already signed the petition to end crow hunting in Connecticut, and particularly those who live in the state, to spend just a little time sending personal emails to friends, relatives, and other contacts, asking them to sign on to the petition and to pass the request on to others. Of course, if you haven’t signed on already, please do so. The link is

      http://www.change.org/petitions/commissioner-conn-dept-of-energy-and-environmental-protection-end-crow-hunting-in-connecticut

      The success of the effort to save all crows will depend largely upon

      Commissioner, Conn. Dept. of Energy and Environmental Protection: End Crow Hunting in Connecticut

      Crow hunting is legal in Connecticut and the regulations of the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection reflect the traditional...

    4. Going Well on Day 3

      Michael Westerfield
      Petition Organizer

      We reached 500 signatures in the first two days on the petition to End Crow Hunting in Connecticut.

      We also sent copies of our book, “The Language of Crows: The crows.net Book of the American Crow,” to decision makers at the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection to educate them about crows. ( www.crows.net/crowbook.html )

      This is a campaign that we can really win if we can demonstrate that there is far more interest in appreciating crows alive than in killing them. Please do all that you can to spread the word about the petition, particularly to your contacts in Connecticut. Personal contact, is the best way to get more signatures. Consider asking family or guests at your home to sit down at your computer and sign the petition while they are there. It only takes a minute. And, please continue to spread the word by email and social media.

      Michael Westerfield

      Introduction to crows.net

      The language and culture of the American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos. All about crows.

    5. Reached 500 signatures
    6. Campaign Begun to End Crow Hunting in Connecticut

      Michael Westerfield
      Petition Organizer

      crows.net has begun the first of it's campaigns to end crow hunting in each of the 49 states in which it is permitted. If you live in Connecticut, it would be great if you could sign the new petition to END CROW HUNTING IN CONNECTICUT. Connecticut is a small state where only about 1% of the population engages in hunting and not many of those are avid crow hunters, so it should be one of the easier places in which to conduct a successful campaign. Folks from outside Connecticut are also welcome to sign the petition, but the signatures of those within the the state will have the most impact.

      Michael Westerfield
      crows.net

      Introduction to crows.net

      The language and culture of the American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos. All about crows.

    7. Reached 10 signatures

    Supporters

    Reasons for signing

    • Tony Angell SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, WA
      • 3 months ago

      As the Co-Author of two books that study the remarkable intelligence and social structure of crows and other corvids (Gifts of the Crow and In the Company of Crows and Ravens) I find the proposed slaughter of crows to be indefensible. There is no evidence that these sentient species have any significant economic impact on our interests but have received the blame for such nevertheless. If crow numbers are to be reduced it will be because we clean up our act (they are consumate scavangers of what we leave behind that is edible) not because we butcher them for what looks like mindless and sadistic recreation.

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    • Dale Morris ROCKPORT, MA
      • 3 months ago

      This is cruel, inhumane, and unnecessary. These beautiful birds have every right to live freely as the rest of us.

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    • Rebecca Sills MISSOULA, MT
      • 4 months ago

      I love crows! They are very intelligent birds and are native to the U.S. They were here before humans!

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    • Patricia Brandon NORTHVILLE, MI
      • 4 months ago

      There is no "sportsmanship" in killing massive amounts of animals/birds just for the sake of killing them. According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service website, the American Crow is listed as being protected by the Migratory Bird Act.

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    • E W HAMMERFEST, NORWAY
      • 5 months ago

      I wish they stops this in Norway too. It is a special bird.

      REPORT THIS COMMENT:

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