Resign the Waitangi Treaty

Resign the Waitangi Treaty

0 have signed. Let’s get to 100!
At 100 signatures, this petition is more likely to be featured in recommendations!
mercedes roberts started this petition to Whakarewarewa and

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document
of New Zealand. It is an agreement drawn up
between representatives of the British Crown and
representatives of Mäori iwi and hapü. It is named
after the place in the Bay of Islands where the Treaty
was first signed, on 6 February 1840, although, in
fact, it was signed all over the country. The Treaty,
like all treaties, is an exchange of promises between
the parties to it. The Treaty is in two languages,
Mäori and English, but this is not exceptional,
as most international treaties are in a number of
languages, often more than two. But the precise
nature of the exchange within the Treaty of
Waitangi is a matter of debate, as the terms
used in the surviving Mäori and English
texts do not mean quite the same thing.
(To find out more, see pages 5-8.) The Treaty
was intended by Great Britain to be an exchange
of sovereignty in return for a guarantee of the
authority of the chiefs and the protection
of Mäori land and resource rights. The
Treaty also extended to Mäori the same
rights and privileges of British citizens.
The copy of the Treaty signed at Waitangi on 6
February 1840, although it has been damaged
over the years, is on display at Archives
New Zealand in Wellington, along with eight
other Treaty sheets that have survived.

Who signed the Treaty of Waitangi,
where and when?
The Treaty was first presented to a meeting of around
500 Mäori at Waitangi on 5 February 1840, and it was
signed by over 40 chiefs on 6 February. It was then
taken to Waimate North and to a major Hokianga
meeting, where further signatures and marks were
added. On 17 February, 200 copies of the Treaty
were printed. A meeting by the Waitemata Harbour
resulted in more signatures. Several manuscript
copies of the Treaty were made in longhand and
were widely circulated. There were about 50
meetings around the country over a seven-month
period in 1840, starting in February and ending
in September.
Over 500 chiefs gave their agreement on one of
the nine Treaty copies that have survived. Most
chiefs signed a Mäori-language copy of the Treaty,
except for 39 chiefs who signed an English-language
version. 

0 have signed. Let’s get to 100!
At 100 signatures, this petition is more likely to be featured in recommendations!