Petition Closed
Petitioning West Union, IA

West Union, IA: Appeal ban of pit bull terriers

Do the two dogs above look like killers to you? no, they look like cuddle buddies. My boyfriend is moving to West Union, IA where there is currently a ban on pit bulls unless you had them before 2005. With your help we can get this ban lifted and allow our baby pits the home they deserve. This petition is important because pit bull terriers that have been raised and trained properly are not allowed admittance into the town. Pit bull terriers only have a bad name because we make it that way. Pit bulls are just as dangerous as any other dog allowed on the streets. Every dog can be mean and attack, it is the owner who holds the responsibility for providing and training a dog to be nice. Yes, pit bulls have lock jaws, but so do boxers, and they are not banned. Pit bulls are good dogs, depending on their living conditions. Even if the ban is to be repealed there can still be obedience training for the dog that must be completed, but to ban an entire breed of dogs due to assumptions of what they could do is not right. Let pit bulls be allowed in West Union, IA. I have owned two papist bulls mans know many others who have Pit bulls as well. None of the Pit bulls that I have been around have ever attacked me or acted out. Every dog is born with a killing instinct, but it's up to the owner to raise the dog appropriately. We the people have a voice and our voice must be heard to solve this injustice against Pit bulls.

What can parents do? 
Educate your children. Studies have found that the number-one dog-bite prevention measure is education. Children who understand how to act around dogs, how to play with dogs, when to leave dogs alone and how to properly meet a dog are much less likely to be bitten. To address this need, American Humane has created American Humane KIDS: Kids Interacting with Dogs Safely™, a dog-bite prevention program specifically for children ages 4 to 7. 
Supervise your children. Unsupervised children may innocently wander too close to a dangerous situation. Eighty-eight percent of fatal dog attacks among 2-year-olds occurred when the child was left unsupervised.1 Supervision of children, especially around dogs, is one way to help ensure they are safe. 
Safe rules of behavior for kids 
Don’t treat a dog unkindly. 
Never hit, kick, slap or bite a dog or pull on his ears, tail or paws. 
Don’t bother a dog when she is busy. 
Never bother dogs with puppies or dogs that are playing with or guarding toys, eating or sleeping. Always leave service dogs alone while they are working. 
Don’t approach a dog you don’t know. 
Never approach a dog that is tied up, behind a fence or in a car. 
If you find an animal, call the police or animal control for help. 
If you want to meet a dog, first ask the owner for permission. If the owner says it’s OK, hold out your hand in a fist for the dog to sniff. If he’s interested, you can give him a little scratch under the chin (notover the head) and say hello. 
Do be calm. 
Always talk in a quiet voice or whisper -- no shouting -- and take a “time out” if you feel angry or frustrated. 
Do be still. 
If a loose dog approaches you, stand still like a tree. Keep your hands at your sides, and stay quiet and calm. Look away from the dog. 
If you are on the ground, curl up into a ball, like a rock. Keep your knees to your chest and your hands over your ears. Stay quiet and calm. Look down at your knees, not at the dog. 
Always make slow movements, set things down carefully and don’t run when you’re around dogs, as this gets them excited and they may accidently hurt you. 
What can dog owners do? 
Spay or neuter your dog. 
Neutering reduces aggression, especially in males. Un-neutered dogs are more than 2.6 times more likely to bite than neutered dogs.3 Female dogs in heat and nursing moms are much more dangerous than spayed females, and their behavior can be unpredictable. Talk to your veterinarian to schedule an appointment, or contact your local humane organization or animal shelter for information on low-cost spay/neuter assistance.

Train and socialize your dog. 
Be sure your dog interacts with and has good manners around all members of the family, the public and other animals. Basic training is as important for the owner as it is for the dog, and socialization is the key to a well-adjusted adult dog. It is essential that puppies between 8 and 16 weeks old be exposed to a variety of people, places, dogs and other animals. As dogs age, do your best to continue their exposure to these things to ensure that they are well socialized throughout their lives.



:1 National Canine Research Foundation. Fatal dog attack studies. Retrieved July 14, 2009, from 

2 Centers for Disease Control. (2003). Nonfatal dog bite-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments-US 2001. MMWR, 52(26), 605-610. 
3 Humane Society of the United States. (2005). National Pet Related Statistics. Shelter Pages, 37-38. 
4 Sacks, J. J., Sinclair, L., Gilchrist, J., Golab, G. C., & Lockwood, R. (2000). Breeds of dogs involved in fatal human attacks in the United States between 1979 and 1998. JAVMA, 217(6), 836-840. 
5 Sacks, J. J., Sattin, R. W., & Bonzo, S. E. (1989). Dog bite-related fatalities from 1979 through 1988. JAMA, 262(11), 1489-1492. 
6 Vicious Animal Legislation Task Force, Report of the Vicious Animal Legislation Task Force


Letter to
West Union, IA
Appeal ban of pit bull terriers